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Stateside
12:01 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

Michigan writer shares family history with recipes spanning three generations

Flinn kids with Diane in the farmhouse kitchen
Credit Kathleen Flinn

Burnt Toast Makes You Sing Good is the beguiling title of the latest book from writer Kathleen Flinn.

It's billed as "A Memoir of Food and Love from an American Midwest Family".

The Midwest Flinn writes about is largely the family farm near Flint, in Davison.

The Flinns and good food seemed to go together: where you find one, you'd find the other.

The book is a wonderful, loving story of a Michigan family, and you get recipes, lots of great recipes. Just what one would expect from the author of The Sharper Your KnifeThe Less You Cry and The Kitchen Counter Cooking School.

Flinn says the book title "Burnt Toast Makes You Sing Good" refers to her grandmother who would accidentally burn her toasts in the oven. 

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Stateside
5:59 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, October 9, 2014

Today on Stateside:

  • Daniel Howes from The Detroit News tells us how 70 years of history crashes up against the realities of building Jeep Wranglers in 2014.
  • We get the answer to an MI Curious question posed by a listener: "What is the status of the Enbridge pipelines at the bottom of Lake Michigan running through the Straits of Mackinac?"
  • What about MSU's Head Coach and AD calling out Spartan fans for leaving early during last Saturday's late-night game against Nebraska? Michigan Radio's sports commentator John U. Bacon shares his views.
  • It's been two years since indie-folk artist Chris Bathgate has taken to a stage. Michigan Radio's Emily Fox discovers why he's back and what's new with his music.
  • With so many in Michigan with business and personal ties to China, we look at what the Hong Kong student protests might mean for mainland China.
  • Continuing our series this week, we explore another story from the Upper Peninsula: a kayak adventure.

* Listen to the full show above.

Stateside
5:56 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Jeep Wrangler production could leave its 70-year home in Toledo

Inside Chrysler Group’s Toledo (Ohio) Assembly Complex
Credit User: Chrysler Group / Flickr

There's a meeting today at Chrysler Headquarters in Auburn Hills.

It's between the CEO of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Sergio Marchionne and some nervous officials from Ohio.

Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes says the concern is Ohio might lose the production of the Jeep Wrangler. 

At an auto show last week, Marchionne suggested that Chrysler may take Wrangler to an all-aluminum, unibody construction. Some expect that will likely shift the model's production from its long-time home in Toledo to Michigan or Illinois.

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Stateside
5:45 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Michigan writer Susan Rasch tells tale of kayak adventure up north

Credit Flickr user Davichi

Throughout the week on Stateside, you've been hearing stories from writers in the Upper Peninsula. 

Today, we explore a story about a kayak adventure from Susan Rasch. 

Rash is a farmer and writer who lives in the Pte. Abbay peninsula, just east of the Keweenaw. 

The story is read by Sheila Bauer.

* Listen to the full story above.

Stateside
5:43 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

After two years, Michigan folk musician Chris Bathgate is back on stage with new songs

Chris Bathgate
Credit User: Chris Bathgate / facebook

Michigan does not seem to have a shortage of indie folk musicians and bands. 

Stateside's Emily Fox sat down with one folk musician who's back on the scene after a two-year hiatus from the stage.

Chris Bathgate is an Ann Arbor-area musician who spent a long time traveling the state and the country playing his music. Sometimes he comes with a full band with percussion and electric base and fiddle backing him up. Sometimes it's just him with guitar, a loop machine, and snare drum. 

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Stateside
5:33 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

We've got (some) answers to your question on the oil pipeline under Lake Michigan

Credit NWF / screenshot from YouTube video

Michigan Radio's MI Curious project puts our journalists to work for you: We investigate questions you submit about our state and its people.

One of the MI Curious questions was submitted by listener Justin Cross from Delton, Michigan. He asked: "What's the status of the Enbridge pipeline in the bottom of Lake Michigan running through the Straits of Mackinac?"

Michigan Radio's Mark Brush has been working to find an answer to the question. Brush says what he found is that Enbridge holds all the cards. The company is willing to talk, and they are aware of people's concerns. 

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Stateside
12:31 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Spoiled fans? John U. Bacon says MSU football can't blame students for leaving games early

It was a cold, wet night at the Spartan Stadium last Saturday.
Credit User: Michigan State Spartans / facebook

If you've forked over money for a ticket to a football game, do you have a responsibility to stay there until the end of the game? 

If you are a student, sitting in the student section at a Michigan State Football game, the answer seems to be yes, you do.

Coach Mark Dantonio and Spartan Athletic Director Mark Hollis have been very clear: They were disappointed in seeing so many fans leave early last Saturday night against Nebraska.

There were nearly 76,000 in the crowd at the start of the game, and there were plenty of empty seats by the end, when MSU nearly lost the game. 

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Stateside
8:29 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Why DIA valuations have varied so wildly

Rivera Court-Detroit Institute of Art
Credit Trish P. / Flickr

All through the Detroit bankruptcy trial, the spotlight has been fixed on the Detroit Institute of Arts.

It has become one of the most contentious and confusing issues in the bankruptcy, as the appraisals of the DIA’s treasures have been wildly different. The city’s appraisal by Christie’s came in at just over $800 million, while an appraisal done by noted expert Victor Wiener pegs the value at more than $8 billion.

Beverly Jacoby is a noted art valuation expert who recently had an op-ed piece in the Detroit Free Press. She's the founder and president of BSJ Fine Art in New York.

Jacoby says there are several reasons for the wildly different values. Jacoby says an appraisal can vary depending on the party that commissions it. “A key issue with any appraisal is the appraiser is hired by a party and that party is the intended user," she says.  

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Stateside
8:28 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Excitement grows for ArtPrize in Grand Rapids

ArtPrize
Credit Gary Syrba

It's going to be crazy in Grand Rapids this Friday night.

Hundreds, maybe thousands of people will flood downtown for the big announcement: This year’s ArtPrize winners.  

As Michigan Radio's Kate Wells reports, ArtPrize has been going on long enough now that it's having some more subtle effects, from how Grand Rapids museums think about their audiences to even inspiring an ArtPrize marriage proposal. 

Among the thousands of visitors to Grand Rapids for ArtPrize, many are children. This will be the first West Michigan generation of kids to grow up being exposed to thousands of pieces of art.

Stateside
8:28 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

189 Years: The importance of the Erie Canal

Credit winslowsix / Flickr

189 years ago this month, the Erie Canal opened.

That connection between the Hudson River in New York and Lake Erie became extremely important to Michigan, which at the time of its construction was on the road to statehood.

Dan Ward is curator of the Erie Canal Museum. He says the Erie Canal was incredibly influential on the history of Michigan. “Prior to the Erie Canal, in order to get to Michigan, you had to go over a mountain range,” Ward says. The canal allowed settlers to travel to Michigan much more easily and quickly than a journey over land.

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Failure:Lab
8:27 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

"Tragedy around the corner:" Failure:Lab with Jimmy King

Credit Brian Kelly

Jimmy King relates his time as a basketball player, and how basketball has affected his life, and recounts how two NCAA Championship losses to Duke and UNC greatly affected his attitude and perception of himself. King also talks about his relatively poor showing in NBA Draft. Watch the video below to see what King says is his failure, and the role basketball played in it.

Stateside
8:27 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Polarizing Politicians: Is a top-two primary the answer?

Credit Ben+Sam / Flickr

How would things change if, instead of the political system we have now, we moved to a "top-two" primary? In other words, one primary in which the top two candidates, regardless of party, move on to the general election.

Paul deLespinasse is a professor emeritus of political science at Adrian College, and believes a big reason for gridlock in Congress and state legislatures in this country is our primary system. 

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Stateside
8:26 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Writers from the UP: Russell Thornburn

Credit =Paul / Flickr

This week we're exploring stories from writers in the Upper Peninsula. Today we have a poem from Marquette resident Russell Thornburn, the first Upper Peninsula poet laureate.

This poem is from a series called "Burden of Place," about surviving the cold UP winters.

This poem is called, "When One Tugs at a Single Thing in Nature, He Finds It Attached to the Rest of the World." It's about a man who is stuck in the cold after his car breaks down.  

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Stateside
11:53 am
Wed October 8, 2014

A food desert in Michigan you never hear about: the Upper Peninsula

Credit user mytvdinner / Flickr

When we talk in Michigan about "food insecurity" and "food deserts", it's usually about Detroit, Flint and cities battling poverty.

But there is another region where access to healthy, fresh food is a constant challenge: the Upper Peninsula.

Take Alger County. It has been classified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a "low income, low access community." That means people have to drive at least ten miles to get to a fully stocked grocery store.

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Stateside
8:59 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Gay couples in Michigan await 6th Circuit ruling after Supreme Court's Monday decision

Credit antiochla.edu / Antioch University

 

The U.S. Supreme Court decided on Monday it will not review lower court rulings on same-sex marriage cases from several states.

Kathy Gray, Detroit Free Press reporter, says that means the U.S. Supreme Court let those lower court rulings stand, which lift the ban on same-sex marriage in the five states – Utah, Oklahoma, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Indiana. 

Michigan's case is still up in the air, because it's being heard – along with cases in Ohio, Tennessee, and Kentucky – in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and a decision could come at any time.

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Stateside
8:53 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Traverse City history shared in the new way: A digital magazine

Sunset in Traverse City
Credit User: Joey Lax-Salinas

 

Walk or drive around your city or town: Chances are good your eyes will fall on something intriguing. Something that makes you wonder, "What's that, and where did it come from?"

But sometimes you don't know where to find the answer.

A new local history magazine aims to be the place for those answers. It's a digital magazine called The Grand Traverse Journal.

Amy Barritt is co-editor of the journal and special collections librarian for the Traverse Area District Library. She says the platform invites the public to be part of the digital magazine by not only reading, but also producing some of its content.

"It's a really good vehicle for people to practice those skill sets of literacy and communication. That's why we think the journal is good not just for our region, but libraries across the state can get started in projects like this," says Barritt.

You can view the Grand Traverse Journal here.

* Listen to our conversation with Amy Barritt above.

Stateside
8:51 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Upper Peninsula writer explores modern Native American life, heritage and struggles

Credit User: Ashley Perkins / Flickr

 

Writer Beverly McBride tells a story about cultural identity among the Native American population. 

The story is from the first chapter in her latest book in the series "One Foot in Two Canoes." In the book description, McBride explained what that saying means:

There is a saying that it is possible for a Native American to travel down the smooth river of life with one foot in each of two canoes, one canoe representing tribal heritage and way of life, and the other "western" thinking and living, committing fully to neither, as long as the river is smooth without rocks, challenges or bends. But when adversity strikes or a proverbial bend in the river appears, a person must then jump into one philosophical canoe or the other, embracing their own culture or denying their heritage. The alternative to making a choice is to float, swim or sink, drowning in the river of life.

Beverly McBride lives in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The story is read by Jackson Knight Pierce.

* Listen to the full story above.

Stateside
8:49 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

UM professor named one of "Brilliant 10" for building energy scavenging sensors

With Dutta's technologies, gadgets like Fitbit don't need to be plugged into the wall or need batteries.
Credit User: Ian D / Flickr

 

It's not often you can say without a shadow of a doubt that someone is "brilliant." 

But you can make a good case for Prabal Dutta. He's an assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan.

And he has been named one of Popular Science's 2014 Brilliant Ten, a list saluting scientific innovators who are changing the world as we know it.

Dutta made this list for his work on energy scavenging sensors. He explains that these sensors won't need batteries because they can harvest energy from the world around them.

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Stateside
8:47 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Michigan communities report better fiscal health

More Michigan jurisdictions report that they are better able to meet their fiscal needs this year compared to the previous year.
Credit Michigan Public Policy Survey

The latest Michigan Public Policy Survey shows that for the first time since 2009, more Michigan communities say they are better able to meet their fiscal needs than those who say they are less able to do so.

For six years, a University of Michigan team from the Ford School's Center for Local, State and Public Policy has been doing regular "temperature" checks with elected and appointed leaders of more than 1,800 local governments around Michigan.

Tom Ivacko is with the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School. He says the data indicate an important development as the state recovers from the Great Recession.

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Stateside
8:45 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Cool weather good for Michigan's pumpkin patches

Credit User: Jeremy Seitz / Flickr

 

Many of us believe it's not officially autumn in Michigan until we've got pumpkins nestled on our front porches.

Today on Stateside, we heard the verdict from the state's pumpkin patch.

Ron Goldy is with the Michigan State University Extension Service. He said Michigan's pumpkin crop this year is one of the best he's seen.

"The color is good, they've ripened on time, the size is good, because the cool temperature allows them to get larger.... This is a great pumpkin year," said Goldy.

Goldy also said odd pumpkins are trending right now. In the next five years or so, we'll see more and more different styles and colors of pumpkins in the market.

* Listen to our conversation with Ron Goldy above.

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