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Stateside Staff

Becky Johns / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

There’s good news to talk about in the re-invention of Detroit and the push to wean Michigan’s economy away from big manufacturing.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes thinks Michigan is “open for business, again.”

F. D. Richards / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

Fast food is not good for us. That's not exactly a secret.

Nutritionists point to all that fat and salt in fast food as one of the main causes of the growing obesity rate in this county, and elsewhere around the world.

There's a commonly held belief that poor people eat more fast food than any other group.

University of Michigan-Dearborn Economics Professor Patricia Smith decided to test that belief in a study on fast food consumption. She found that the poor don’t actually eat more fast food than anyone else. It is those who are busiest, often the middle class, that do.

Mary Hornbeck and her husband struggle to support themselves and their four children in Albion.
Alli Billings / Michigan Radio

President Donald Trump's budget plan contains cuts to programs like housing subsidies, child care assistance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, and other programs that serve the poor.

With so many of the programs under threat, Stateside set out to talk to people who are struggling with living paycheck to paycheck. The series takes a look at the so-called "working poor" – who they are, what challenges they face, and what policy changes might help the most people.

Judge's gavel
Joe Gratz / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Iraqi nationals facing possible deportation from the U.S. won an important victory in court this week. Tuesday, Detroit U.S. District Court Judge Mark Goldsmith issued a ruling that put a pause on any government plans to deport an estimated 1,400 Iraqi nationals living in the United States with final orders of removal.  

Josh Hakala / Michigan Radio

MI Curious is Michigan Radio’s project that asks for your questions about our state and its people.

All high-quality journalism starts with a question, so ask us yours. We want your voice to be a part of our show.

Stateside 7.12.2017

Jul 12, 2017

Today on Stateside, we answer listener Olivia Cushway's question: "How did Pere Cheney become a ghost town?" And, we hear why there are fewer and fewer avenues to the middle class for low-income families.

Russell Sage Foundation, 2016


The Trump administration’s proposed budget would potentially cut housing subsidies, child care assistance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program and other programs that serve the poor by staggering amounts.

In response to that, Stateside is beginning a new series looking at the so-called working poor — who they are, what challenges they face and what policy changes might help the most people.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Congress has until the end of September to finalize a budget for the new fiscal year. The Trump Administration has proposed drastic cuts to science and research. While some in Congress are calling for spending increases.

The scientific community is sounding clear warnings about what curbing research funding would mean for the United States. A new analysis by University of Michigan researchers finds the U.S. would lose its top spot as a contributor to science research. Meanwhile, a huge competitor is ready to leap ahead: China.

Courtesy of the Crawford County HIstorical Society / Michigan History Center

If you like bird watching, Pere Cheney is a great place to see the Kirtland Warbler. Other than that, there isn't much there.

It's what you might call a ghost town.

If you're wondering how that happened, you're not alone. Michigan Radio listener Olivia Cushway of Ypsilanti posed that very question to our MI Curious team. 

state capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today is the only day this month that Michigan's lawmakers are in session, and the House used it to vote on a major new tax incentive for businesses.

Months of lively debate ended when the tax incentive package passed with bipartisan support. It was a vote that defied House Republican leaders and Speaker Tom Leonard, and served up a big win for Governor Rick Snyder.

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Michigan’s strong history in the defense sector dates back to Rosie the Riveter in World War II.

The Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) reports the defense sector supports 105,000 jobs in our state, turning out $9 billion in goods and services.

Michigan wants to continue that tradition by landing the new F-35 fighter jet.

Stateside 7.11.2017

Jul 11, 2017

Today, we hear why the state's largest hospital system would prefer to repair the Affordable Care Act, not start from scratch. And, we learn why the Selfridge Air National Guard Base aims to become a home for the new F-35 fighter jet.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

A piggy bank, stethescope and bundle of one dollar bills
401(k) 2013 / Flickr

Returning from the 4th of July recess, Senate Republicans are going to try again to come up with a health care bill that can win the 50 votes it needs to pass.

Word is, they hope to have a revised health bill to show senators by week's end, perhaps by Thursday.

Courtesy of Wil Rankinen

There is no better reminder of what a diverse state we live in than contemplating the differences between the Upper Peninsula and the Lower Peninsula.

Wil Rankinen​ is an associate professor of communication sciences and disorders at Grand Valley State. He's also a born and raised "Yooper." Rankinen is spending his summer exploring the way Yoopers talk by criss-crossing the UP to record long-time residents.

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Summer is a time for crowd pleasers in the theater world.

David Kiley of Encore Michigan joined Stateside for another round of Theater Talk, highlighting the newest summer shows.

COURTESTY OF SHELDON HILL

Is there hope for a new life after being addicted to drugs or selling drugs?

Detroiter Sheldon Hill is proof there is.

After years of selling and using drugs, and multiple arrests, Hill went into an addiction recovery program. He was in his 40s. And it worked.

Today, Hill's sole mission in life is to keep others from making the mistakes and choices he made as a young man.

Stateside 7.10.2017

Jul 10, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear why some alleged victims are furious over former doctor Larry Nassar's plea deal. We also hear why one political consultant thinks the Democratic Party's messaging is still failing to convince voters. And, we learn why Michigan trees are migrating. (Note: It's not all due to climate change).

Courtesty of LINCS

The Next Idea

Parents of children on the autism spectrum face significant challenges in getting the right education, support and other life tools for their kids. But the difficulties don’t go away when these kids grow up. Can they live alone, support themselves, be a part of society? And what happens when their adult caregivers age out of watching over them?

Credit: Gage Skidmore / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Democratic Party's stinging loss in the 2016 presidential election has led to much hand-wringing and talk about coming up with a better message that resonates with voters.

Jen Eyer, senior vice president at Vanguard Public Affairs, thinks the latest Democratic messaging attempts prove the party still doesn't "get it."

For example, take the new sticker campaign recently unveiled by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the campaign arm for House Democrats. One of the slogans reads: “Democrats 2018: I Mean, Have You Seen The Other Guys?”

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Most of us expect to hear that trees are moving north in search of colder temperatures because of global climate change. But trees don’t only need colder temperatures; they also need to have enough water.

A new study published in Science Advances suggests that trees are moving west in search of more moisture.

Associate Professor School for Environment and Sustainability Inés Ibáñez joined us on Stateside to share her perspective on the many other global change factors that are causing this migration.

"The Scent of Jasmine: Coming of Age in Jerusalem and Damascus" by Anan Ameri
Courtesy of Anan Ameri

Anan Ameri has made her mark here in Michigan.  She is the founder of the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, an inductee into the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame, and she is the founder of the Palestine Aid Society of America.

Now, Ameri is making a new mark as an author. Her new memoir is titled, The Scent of Jasmine: Coming of Age in Jerusalem and Damascus and she joined Stateside to talk about her upbringing. 

Hubble ESA / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

There's a big new discovery in the world of astronomy.

And "big" is appropriate: it's a giant planet much like Jupiter, revolving around a star about 385 light years from the sun.

“We think we have an estimate of its temperature, somewhere around 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. So it’s very toasty on this planet,” said Michael Meyer, a University of Michigan professor of astronomy who is part of the team that discovered this planet.

A new study shows that as many as 85% of homes in Detroit might have been taxed at rates that violate the Michigan Constitution.
BasicGov / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The tax foreclosure crisis in Detroit may not get the attention it deserves. In fact, the tax foreclosure crisis didn’t just happen, and it doesn't continue to happen, by unfortunate circumstances. There are decisions behind it. One group says those decisions are illegal.

sign that says flint
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Genesee County official charged with collecting delinquent taxes says she won't collect money for tax liens placed on homes with overdue water bills. That means Flint homes with delinquent water bills will avoid the threat of foreclosure. 

Flint’s state-appointed Receivership Transition Advisory Board recently ordered the City of Flint to resume placing tax liens on homes that didn’t keep up with their water bills during the time when Flint’s water wasn’t safe to drink or use for bathing.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson released her response to a request from the Trump administration’s election commission for voter data on Monday. She agreed to turn over some information but not all, citing Michigan law.

Ken Sikkema, senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants and a former Republican legislative leader, and Vicki Barnett, a former mayor of Farmington Hills and a former Democratic legislator,  joined Stateside to discuss that and other political headlines from the past week.

Stateside 7.7.2017

Jul 7, 2017

  

Today on Stateside, the Genesee County treasurer won't foreclose on homes with unpaid water bills because the "water was poison." And, we hear how treatment and understanding of PTSD are evolving. 

Steinbart with bottle of her vodka
Courtesy of Kyle Miller

Michigan native Hedy Steinbart is the mastermind behind Oma's Cherry-Infused Vodka.

Steinbart, 92, joined Stateside along with her grandson Kyle Miller to explain how they turned her home recipe into a business.

four soldiers
Elliott Plack / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

For more than a hundred years, medical practitioners have been trying to figure out post-traumatic stress disorder.

Assistant Professor of Practice Marisa Brandt and Associate Professor of Philosophy Robyn Bluhm, from Michigan State University, recently published an article in The Conversation which tells the story of the invisible trauma caused by war and the sometimes barbaric treatments doctors used on soldiers returning home with PTSD.

Stateside 7.6.2017

Jul 6, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how Wayne County may have a national model for prosecuting crimes against the LGBTQ community. And, we learn about a bipartisan effort to take redistricting out of politicians' hands.

From left to right: Special Prosecutor Jaimie Powell-Horowitz, Fair Michigan Justice Project President Dana Nessel, and Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy.
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

It's called the Fair Michigan Justice Project, a collaboration between the LGBTQ advocacy group Fair Michigan and the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office.

It marks an important new approach to pursuing hate crimes committed against people who are LGBTQ.

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