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Stateside Staff

“There are so many obituaries that I read, ... and I think, I’ve been aware of this person but I didn’t know this person," Thomas Lynch told us.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

 

How much do you care about the ultimate story of your life?

For many people, that final story is contained within their obituary.

Alyse & Remi / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Following the election of Donald Trump, many Mexican-Americans are worried about how the president-elect’s proposed immigration overhaul, if implemented, might affect them.

Screengrab of "Failure:Lab | David V. Wenzel" video

We all fail sometimes. No exceptions. 

It's often hard to admit, but failure is an essential part of the human experience. 

That's what Failure:Lab is all about.

Ingham Co. Prosecutor Stuart Dunnings
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

As the Prosecuting Attorney for Ingham County, Stuart Dunnings III was the guy who sent people to prison. Today, the disgraced former prosecutor stood before a judge in Genesee County Circuit Court after pleading guilty to a felony charge of misconduct in office, and a misdemeanor charge of engaging the services of a prostitute.

Dunnings had been facing 15 prostitution-related charges that were spread over three counties. He was sentenced to three years probation, with the first year to be served in county jail.

Bruce LaBrecque says there are so many painful issues that a woman's OBGYN might be reluctant to ask about that can be treated with physical therapy.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Whether it's baby boomers seeking help for aging joints or people seeking alternatives to surgery, the physical therapy industry is growing. And now women are turning to physical therapy for specialized help.

Bruce LaBrecque, an RN and a women's health physical therapist in Bay City with Renue Physical Therapy, joined Stateside to talk about how more and more women, young and old, are turning to physical therapy to address intimate health issues. 

On this episode of Stateside, we dig into the question of whether Michigan students have a right to literacy, and what a re-write of the North American Free Trade Agreement could mean for Michigan and our biggest trading partner, Canada.  Also, a mold-breaking Michigander shares her story of making it as an advertising executive... there's a new Yelp-like app for migrant workers... an indigenous game developer talks about healing water through songs... and Michigan Radio's John U. Bacon breaks down the sporting news from this past weekend.

"Pressure Makes Diamonds: Becoming the Woman I Pretended to Be"
Courtesy of Valerie Graves

 

You may not know her name, but it’s a good bet you know her work.

Valerie Graves has worked in the creative departments at the nation’s leading advertising firms. She’s been creative director for top Fortune 500 accounts like General Motors, Ford, Burger King, AT&T, Pepsi and more. She’s been a top executive for Motown Records, and she was creative consultant to President Bill Clinton.

Advertising Age named her one of the “100 Best and Brightest” in the industry.

Rosenbaum told us the state’s assertion that there’s no fundamental right to literacy is “nonsense.”
flickr user Thomas Galvez / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 


On September 13, seven Detroit school children sued state officials.

The suit was filed in federal court in Detroit. It claims that literacy is a fundamental right, and that the state has denied that right by fundamentally excluding Detroit students from the state’s educational system.

Now attorneys for Governor Rick Snyder have fired back. They say there’s no fundamental right to literacy, and this suit is “an attempt to destroy the American tradition of democratic control of schools.”

Courtesy of Elizabeth LaPensée

There's an app for just about everything. Proof of that is Honour Water.

It's a new app that teaches you Anishinaabe songs about water. Anishinaabe is the name used by native tribes including the Odawa, Ojibwe, Potawatomi and Alquonquin peoples.

wikimedia user McZusatz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

As President-elect Trump and his team prepare for inauguration in two months, Michigan is preparing for President-elect Trump.

And Trump has outlined a number of things he'd like to do with regard to trade in his first 100 days in office.

"I feel like everything has become partisan nowadays," Demas told us.
flickr user Forsaken Fotos / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Across America, reports of politically related harassment have soared in the wake of the presidential election.

To list a few incidents that have happened in Michigan:

There are more. Too many more.

Susan Demas joined us today to talk about how the post-election bullying has impacted her family.

On Stateside today, we learn how the recent discovery of a potential dwarf planet could lead astronomers to the evasive Planet Nine. We also hear an expert's take on the possible effects to come if President-elect Trump pulls back on efforts to reduce climate change.

User salinadarling / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This week, we learned the owners of the Detroit News were offering buy-outs to all of the newspaper’s editorial staff. Then, later in the week, we learned the owners of the Detroit Free Press were offering buy-outs to 17 editorial staff.

Without enough buy-outs, both papers will lay off staff.

This downsizing worries those who fear the eventual death of one of our daily-print newspapers.

President-elect Trump claims that he is going to bring back coal production, but is there a market demand for it?
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Energy policy will change under the new administration and state policies in places such as Michigan are more likely to look like Trump policies than Obama polices. That's the opinion of Mark A. Barteau, the director of the University of Michigan Energy Institute.

Trump has made clear statements that he believes climate change is a hoax and he plans to dismantle the Obama administration’s energy policies. This will affect gas and oil production. Trump has also said he’ll bring “clean coal” production back, but it's not certain there is market demand.

Courtesy of the Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit

The Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit is holding a meeting to determine its priorities for the coming years. It’s called a synod, and since the Archdiocese was established in 1833, there have been only ten. The last one was in the 1960s.

Detroit Archbishop Allen Vigneron joined Stateside to talk about this rare gathering. He said the impetus for the Synod came from no less than Pope Francis himself.

Today, we learn why the auto industry might find an ally in Donald Trump. And we learn why some high schools in Michigan are switching to 8-man football teams, instead of 11.

Bill Ford at Web Summit 2015 in Dublin, Ireland
flickr user Web Summit / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

In a little over two months, Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes is digging into what that could mean for our auto industry.

Wealthy Street used to be a predominantly African American business district, but Robinson told us there are only two black-owned businesses there today.
flickr user Steven Depolo / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Next Idea

One proven way to give local businesses a boost is by grouping them together and building a brand. Think Detroit’s Greektown or Corktown, or Little Italy and Chinatown in other cities.

Jamiel Robinson is working to make that happen for black-owned businesses in Grand Rapids.

Robinson is founder and curator of the group Grand Rapids Area Black Businesses.

Lindsey Scullen / Michigan Radio

 

They’re known as the Mother Earth Water Walkers: Two Anishinaabe grandmothers and a group of Anishinaabe women and men, walking the perimeter of the Great Lakes, hoping to raise awareness of the environmental and manmade threats against the lakes.

They began walking in 2003, and over the next six years walked all of the 11,525 miles around the Great Lakes.

Now the story of the Water Walkers is told in a children’s book by Michigan author Carol Trembath, with illustrations by David W. Craig.

Courtesy of Marcel Price

It's a real challenge to talk about mental health issues and challenges — even more so when you're young, when you feel like an "other."

Marcel Price is tackling that challenge through poetry and spoken word. As "Fable The Poet,” this young Michigander writes about mental wellness. And in his work with Mental Health America, he's traveling to high schools around Michigan and across the country, helping kids understand their shared struggles.

Animal bones found in the Saints Rest privy.
Courtesy of Autumn Byers

Archeology is not just about digging into prehistory, coming up with arrowheads, pottery shards and mastodon bones.

It can also give us a window into the not-too-distant past.

Say, the campus of Michigan State University in the mid-1800s.

That’s what Autumn Beyer is doing in her work with the MSU Campus Archeology Program. She’s studying what students and professors ate in the early days at Michigan State and how they got that food.

 

We discuss how the Motor City is evolving into the Mobility City – a city specializing in all things transportation. And, we sit down with the Reverend Jesse Jackson to talk about what he calls the "struggle for the soul of America."

The RTA identified the Michigan Avenue Corridor as one of the areas that would have benefited from a regional transit system, had the millage passed.
Regional Transit Authority

It's back to the drawing board for those who've been working towards a true regional transportation system for Southeast Michigan.

A slim majority of voters across Wayne, Oakland, Macomb and Washtenaw counties last week rejected the regional transit millage. And it will be two years before the RTA can try again.

Stateside was joined by the President and CEO of the Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce, Sandy Baruah, who had been hoping the RTA millage would pass. 

Today, we break down the complex energy bills that just cleared the state Senate. Then, a Syrian-born physician on traveling back to his war-torn homeland. Also, the story of how one "crack baby" turned his life around, and why he's now mentoring young people to keep them from following his early path. Plus, the Detroit Chamber on what went wrong with the RTA millage. Finally, we take a listen to the American-Swedish music of Premo & Gustafsson.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

 "My grandmother always told me I was smart, and so I believed it. And so by the time she left, being smart and doing good in school was something that Shawn just did," Blanchard told us.
Courtesy of Shawn Blanchard

 


If anyone seemed destined for a life that would either end in a drug deal gone bad or in prison, it would probably be Shawn Blanchard.

Everything in his life pointed him down that path, beginning with the fact that Shawn was born with crack cocaine in his system.

Instead, Blanchard is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he majored in math and economics. He’s also a graduate of Wayne State University’s Law School.

His memoir is titled How ‘Bout That for a Crack Baby.

Portland General Electric / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Last week, amid the frenzy that followed the presidential election, the Michigan Senate passed a pair of bills that would mean a dramatic overhaul of Michigan’s energy policy. The bills, which still have to make it through the Michigan House of Representatives, would be the first new energy policy in Michigan since 2008.

We spoke with Rick Pluta, Michigan Radio’s Lansing Bureau Chief, about the new legislation. He told us that, although the two bills both had bipartisan support and passed by wide margins, they also have detractors.

For many Michiganders, the start of firearm hunting season is like a state holiday. Today, tens of thousands of hunters hope they'll be successful as they head outdoors in search of deer. 

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) hopes the successful hunters will stop by one of their deer check stations before having their deer processed. It's a good way for the DNR to keep tabs on the health of Michigan's deer herds.

 

Today, we discuss the reports of harassment and intimidation in the days after the presidential election. We also learn what history may tell us about that election and the turmoil left in the aftermath of such a long, tough campaign.

screen grab from 60 Minutes / CBS News

Over the last week since Donald Trump was declared the winner of the 2016 Presidential Election, there have been an increase in the number of reports of harassment and bullying directed at students of color and religious minorities.

Speaking to Lesley Stahl last night on CBS' 60 Minutes, President-elect Donald Trump addressed the recent incidents.

Trump said he was "saddened" by the news and implored people to "stop it".

Some have taken issue with Officer Peters' actions, while others are defending his First Amendment right to express himself.
flickr user edward stojakovic / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Since Donald Trump’s election there has been an increase nationwide in reports of harassment and intimidation of minorities.

One such incident is making headlines in Traverse City. Police Officer Michael Peters has been suspended after flying the Confederate flag on his truck at a “Love Trumps Hate” rally.

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