Stateside Staff

Pages

Stateside
3:46 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

News from the Detroit Auto Show: The future of GM, a new Chrysler headquarters, and driverless cars

Shots of the 2012 Auto Show.
Mark Brush Michigan Radio

Media preview days are in full swing at the North American International Auto Show.

Over 5,000 reporters from around the world have converged on Cobo Center, including Daniel Howes, a business columnist with The Detroit News.

Howes talks with us about the big car news to come out of the auto show.

Listen to full interview above.

Stateside
3:33 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

What the ACA means for treating Mental illness

Michigan Health Insurance Program is offering more options to people with pre-existing conditions.
user striatic Flickr

As the Affordable Care Act rolled out, there's been plenty of focus on physical health, pre-existing conditions. But we haven't heard too much about what the ACA means for treating Mental Illness.

And that is something that is a growing concern as mentally ill people fill Michigan's jails and prisons. What could it mean to these people to be able to obtain treatment?

Joining us is Ben Robinson. He's the President and CEO of Rose Hill Center in Holly, in Oakland County. They offer residential treatment for adults with mental illness. He's also on the Executive Board of the Michigan Association of Community Mental Health Boards.

Stateside
3:32 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

What can we expect to hear in Gov. Snyder's State of the State address?

Gov. Rick Snyder.
gophouse.com

Gov. Rick Snyder delivers his fourth State of the State address tomorrow night. Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta, co-hosts of Michigan Radio’s It’s Just Politics, talk about what we can expect to hear in the governor’s address.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
3:30 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

Red Ryder Daisy Air Rifle made in Michigan

The Daisy Wall was torn down in November of 2013.
Plymouth Preservation Network Facebook

In the Wayne County city of Plymouth, a group is trying to preserve the last remnant of a factory that was once a deep part of the community - the Daisy Manufacturing Company.

Fans of the film "A Christmas Story" may recall the Red Ryder Daisy Air Rifle.

Yes, that red rifle that Ralphie pined for would have been made at the former Daisy Factory.

Joining us is Wendy Harkins. She is president of the Plymouth Preservation Network.

Politics & Culture
4:52 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Stateside for Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014

There are 2,5000 dams in Michigan and more than 90% are going to hit or exceed their design life by 2020. On today's show: How concerned should we be about our aging dams, and is there the money and political will to fix them? Then, the state's chief medical doctor explains why this year's flu season seems to be a particularly rough one.  And, one man from Ann Arbor is working to earn respect for dads all over America with the Dad 2.0 Summit. Also, the Detroit Zoo is not just a tourist attraction, it's a leader in animal conservation and preservation. 

First on the show, the data and numbers crunchers have been working away, trying to peer into the future to figure out what lies ahead for Michigan over the next 10 years in terms of jobs and pay.

The verdict: Michigan's economic axis is tilting west. Rick Haglund's recent story for Bridge Magazine is headlined: "Future job growth favors West Michigan." 

And Don Grimes is with the Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy at the University of Michigan.

They join us today to discuss the issue.

Stateside
4:51 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Ann Arbor father seeks respect for all dads in America

Father and son.
Flickr user dadblunders Flickr

How about some respect for dads, everyone?

How about we stop with the marketing and entertainment cliches portraying Dad as a big ol' doofus who can't boil a pot of water or change a nasty diaper? And we start recognizing that men play a very active role in the home life and they are not the opposite side of the coin to the "supermommy."

This has been the mission of our next guest. Doug French been one of the nation's leading "daddy bloggers" ever since launching his blog "Laid Off Dad" over 10 years ago. And in July 2010, he created another blog, When the Flames Go Up, blogging with his ex-wife about co-parenting after divorce.

He's also the co-founder of the upcoming Dad 2.0 Summit, which aims to raise the profile of America's dads in the eyes of companies and marketers.

He does all of this as he practices the fine art of being a dad.

Doug French joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:51 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Detroit Zoo recognized as leader in animal conservation and welfare

Detroit Zoo entrance.
Wikipedia

It was 1883 when the Detroit Zoo first opened its doors at Michigan Avenue and Trumbull Street, across from what would become Tiger Stadium.

By 1928, the zoo had moved its current home at 10 Mile Road and Woodward Avenue. It's the No. 1 paid tourist attraction in Michigan, drawing more than 1.1 million visitors every year.

The zoo's mission has evolved  since those early days, shifting from animal care to animal welfare. It's a leader in animal conservation and welfare.

Detroit Zoo Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer Ron Kagan  gives us a closer look at the ways the zoo has become such a leader in protecting and preserving animal species.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:50 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Job growth is expected in West Michigan, but Detroit will have higher wages

Grand Rapids is one of the cities expected to see a lot of job growth, along with Traverse City and Ann Arbor.
Steven Depolo Creative Commons

The data and numbers crunchers have been working away, trying to peer into the future to figure out what lies ahead for Michigan over the next 10 years in terms of jobs and pay.

And the verdict: Michigan's economic axis is tilting west.

Rick Haglund's recent story for Bridge Magazine is headlined: "Future job growth favors West Michigan."

And Don Grimes is with the Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy at the University of Michigan.

They both joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:50 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Flu season gets a grip on Michigan

Wikimedia

It's starting to make its presence felt in empty chairs at the workplace and sad little Facebook status updates saying, "I'm sick."

Flu season is upon us.

Federal officials report 35 states are now experiencing widespread influenza activity with young and middle-aged adults being hit hardest this year rather than the usual pattern of seniors or children.

Dr. Matthew Davis, chief medical executive for the Michigan Department of  Community Health and a professor at the University of Michigan, joined us today to give us an idea of what the flu season looks like in Michigan.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:49 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Michigan dams are in bad condition

The dam in question.
Photo by Bob Allen

There are nearly 2,600 dams in Michigan, and more than 90% are going to hit or exceed their design life by 2020.

That's according to the American Society of Civil Engineers, which gave Michigan a grade of "D" on the condition of its dams.

Keith Metheny looked into the issue of Michigan's aging dams in a recent piece in the Detroit Free Press, where he is the environmental reporter. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
5:11 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Mitch Albom explores life and the afterlife in his new book

Albom's book, "The First Phone Call From Heaven".

What if the end is not the end?

It's that question that lies at the core of Mitch Albom's latest book, "The First Phone Call From Heaven."  The story takes place in Coldwater, Michigan, where a handful of inhabitants are receiving mysterious phone calls from people who have died. Are the calls from the afterlife, or just a hoax?  Mitch Albom tells us more about his newest book.  Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
5:10 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Budget surplus causes debate in Lansing

Michigan capitol building in Lansing.
user: pianowow

A pleasant problem occupies the minds in Lansing today: What should be done with a projected surplus of $971 million?

As one might expect, there is no shortage of debate surrounding what should be done with the windfall. 

We're joined by Chris Gautz, Capitol correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business, and Jonathan Oosting, MLive's Lansing reporter.

Read more
Auto
5:10 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Detroit's auto show celebrates 25 years in the big leagues

Detroit's North American International Auto Show (file photo).
Mercedes Mejia/Michigan Radio

This week's opening of the auto show at Cobo Center in Detroit marks 25 years since the show took its jump into the big time. 

What used to be the "Detroit Auto Show" became the North American International Auto Show, putting Detroit square in the center of the auto show universe. 

Detroit Free Press Business columnist Tom Walsh explores the show's history.

Read more
Stateside
8:46 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

What will Gov. Snyder say about the environment in his State of the State address?

Lisa Wozniak
http://www.michiganlcv.org/

Gov. Snyder delivers his State of the State address a week from today. He'll likely talk about new policy initiatives and proposals and issues concerning everything from transportation and infrastructure to education. Lisa Wozniak, however, will be listening intently to what the Governor has to say about one specific topic: the environment.

Lisa Wozniak is the Executive Director of the Michigan League for Conservation Voters, and she joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
8:43 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Detroit ruins become a playground for 'free skiers'

Clip from Poor Boyz Productions YouTube

After 40 years of decline, Detroit has become a haven of so called ruin porn, with people flocking from all over the country and the world to photograph the city’s many decaying buildings.

Once winter was in full swing, a video went viral on social media. And it’s an epic, not to mention adventurous example of ruin porn.

Stateside’s Emily Fox has more.

Listen to the full audio above.

Watch "Tracing Skylines":

Stateside
8:41 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

China becomes the world leader in wind power

user vaxomatic flickr

In China, more and more cities are seeing their streets filled with smog as cars and power stations pollute the air. One response by the Chinese government is to launch a major push for cleaner renewable energy. China is now the world's leading producer of wind power and it has plans to install thousands of turbines every year, especially in the remote regions in the country's far west.

That's where the BBC's science editor David Shukman is, and he sent us this report.

Listen to the full audio above.

Stateside
8:39 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Why are women underrepresented in science and what can be done to change this?

Women should be encouraged to pursue science as a career.
Argonne National Laboratory Flickr

A young woman entered college, full of the dreams she’d been holding tight since early grade school: dreams of being a doctor. She entered college in pre-med as a biology major. The biology part of pre-med went just great. But the chemistry was tough, and, in the middle of her sophomore year, when she saw she’d gotten a “D” in organic chem lab, that was that. She dropped out of all her science classes, switched over to History and tried to forget that she’d ever wanted to be a surgeon.

Today she’s glad to be hosting Stateside here on Michigan Radio!

But even after 34 years in radio and TV, Cynthia Canty still finds herself wondering what if she had not let that one “D” chase her out of her science major? And why did no one try to encourage her to keep plugging away?

So when the New York Times Sunday Magazine recently ran a long piece by writer Eileen Pollack titled “Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science?” it struck a very personal chord.

As Eileen finds, women are still underrepresented in the STEM classes and careers that are so crucial to our country’s future prosperity.

But the University of Michigan is working hard to find ways to nurture and support women students and faculty in the sciences.

We were joined today by the author of that New York Times piece. She is one of the first two women to earn a bachelor of science degree in physics from Yale. Today she teaches creative writing at the University of Michigan.

Tim McKay is a professor of astrophysics at the University of Michigan, and he directs the undergrad honors program.

Abby Stewart is a professor of psychology and women’s studies at Michigan. She directs the university’s advance program.

The three of them joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:18 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, January 9, 2014

Last month, Governor Rick Snyder called for less coal power and more renewable energy in Michigan. Utilities are in a good position, but questions remain over whether lawmakers will be able to act before the state's current energy standards expire. We found out more on today's show.

Then, of all the physics professors in the United States, only 14% are women. Why do some female scientists give up? And what can be done to help female students and minorities succeed?

And, we heard from the BBC on how China had become the world leader for wind power.

Also, a group of “free skiers” have found a new ski location in the abandon buildings of Detroit.

First on the show, it's Thursday, time for the first check-in of this New Year with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes.

Understandably, he has the auto industry on his mind as we prepare for next week's opening of the North American International Auto Show. He got an early look at the show, and he joined us today to discuss it.

Politics & Culture
4:17 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

In the past decade, health care price transparency has become a hot topic. On today’s program we shed some light on why some hospitals in the same city or state charge thousands more for the same procedure. And what you can do to compare prices. Then later in the hour, the story of why John Lennon sang to free Michigan-native and poet John Sinclair.

But first, emergency unemployment benefits, and Senatorial "jitters" over an Enbridge oil pipeline running through the Straits of Mackinac.

Both are issues consuming attention from Michigan's Congressional delegation.

Let's start with the fact that more than a week ago, a federal unemployment benefits program expired leaving 1.3 million jobless Americans without aid. Some 45,000 of them are here in Michigan.

The program is the Emergency Unemployment Compensation program,EUC for short. Here in Michigan, the EUC added 36 more weeks to the state's regular 20 weeks of benefits.

On Capitol Hill today, Democrats are trying to pressure House Republicans to extend the program for three more months.

Detroit Free Press Washington reporter Todd Spangler joins us now to tell us more about this bid to revive the EUC.

*Listen to the audio above.

Stateside
4:11 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

When John Lennon came to Ann Arbor

A program from the John Sinclair Freedom Rally at Crisler Arena on December 10, 1971.
Wystan Flickr

An interview with James Mitchell.

Dec. 10, 1971. Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor. John Lennon steps up to the microphone.

"It ain't fair, John Sinclair…” the former Beatle sings.

In his new book, "The Walrus And The Elephants: John Lennon's Years of Revolution," author James Mitchell tells the story of Lennon’s trip to Michigan, and why Ann Arbor was the perfect launchpad for Lennon's new life as a revolutionary.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Pages