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Stateside
4:46 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

Michigan writer releases new memoir about her time in Sweden

Author Natalie Burg
LinkedIn

(Editor's note: This story was first aired on October 2nd, 2013)

Who among us has not had the experience of plunging into something that sure sounded good on paper, but then the reality turns out to be anything but?

So, when life hands you that proverbial lemon, you could make ‘lemonade.’ Or you could write a book.

That’s what Natalie Burg did.

Michigan writer Natalie Burg had a spectacularly bizarre experience living on a farm in Sweden, working as an au pair for a spectacularly bizarre family. She has turned all of that into a new book called “Swedish Lessons: A Memoir of sects, love and indentured servitude. Sort of.”

She joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:38 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

Former Nixon Administration official says it's time for a new political party: The Moderate Majority

The U.S. Capitol.
user kulshrax Flickr

(Editor's note: This interview was first broadcast on November 14, 2013)

Polls following last month’s partial federal shutdown make it pretty clear: Americans are tired of both Republican and Democratic lawmakers. Two-thirds of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents disapproved of the shutdown. Fifty-seven percent of Americans were angry with the way Democrats handled the shutdown. In total, eight in 10 Americans say they oppose the shutdown.

Read more
Politics & Culture
4:00 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, December 24th, 2013

Today on Stateside, a former Nixon official talks about possibly forming a third political party.

And Michigan writer Natalie Burg talks about being au pair for a family in Sweden. 

Also, Kinetic Affect uses the power of poetry to help people unlock their voices.

That and more on today's Stateside.

*Listen to audio above.

Politics & Culture
4:00 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Stateside for Monday, December 23rd, 2013

On today's show, protecting the practice of breastfeeding. Michigan is one of only five states that doesn't legally protect the practice.

And solving a 50-year-old cold case in Battle Creek.

Also, it's the 75th anniversary of legendary folklorist Alan Lomax' trip to Michigan. That and more on today's Stateside.

Listen to the audio above.

Arts & Culture
3:04 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Author Blaine Pardoe delves into a 1963 Battle Creek murder

barnesandnoble.com

Blaine Pardoe interview for 9/3/2013

(Editor's note: This story was first broadcast on September 3rd, 2013) 

The mystery of who killed Daisy Zick has been on the minds of police and residents of Battle Creek since January, 1963.  Though at least three people caught a glimpse of her killer, no one has ever been brought to justice for the crime.  

Writer Blaine Pardoe's latest book is called Murder in Battle Creek: The Mysterious Death of Daisy Zick.  He joined Cynthia Canty in the studio to talk about Daisy Zick, her unsolved murder, and the possibility that the killer may still be alive.  

Listen to the story above.

Stateside
1:56 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Michigan lawmakers moving to legally protect breastfeeding moms

user tiarescott Flickr

It seems hard to believe in 2013, but it's true -- Michigan is one of only five states without a law protecting breastfeeding moms, allowing them to breastfeed their babies in any public or private location.

But that might change soon. The State Senate recently passed a bill that would protect breastfeeding Moms. The bill now goes to the State House for lawmakers to discuss in the new session, starting January 8.  Joining me is a lawmaker who has been working on the bill, State Senator Rebekah Warren.

Stateside
10:24 am
Fri December 20, 2013

Detroit News columnist talks about Duggan and Bing

Dave Bing in the office he'll be leaving soon.
Kate Davidson Michigan Radio

In less than two weeks, Detroit will have a new mayor.

Mike Duggan's term begins January first. Outgoing Mayor Dave Bing has been making his "farewell tour" around Detroit.

What is the Bing legacy? And what might we expect from his successor?

We turned to Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes for some perspective.

Listen above.

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Stateside
9:54 am
Fri December 20, 2013

Listen for a list of good winter reads by Keith Taylor

Keith Taylor
Robert Turney

This is the week we say farewell to autumn and officially welcome winter. (Unofficially, we can all agree, winter has arrived early and seems to have settled right in for the duration.)

And one of the great pleasures of changing seasons here on Stateside is the chance to welcome back poet and writer Keith Taylor. Taylor coordinates the undergraduate creative writing program at the University of Michigan. But we like to think of him as our Friendly Stateside Reading Guide.

Listen to Keith’s book pics above.

Stateside
3:07 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

Exploring "Ballroom Culture" in Detroit

The cover of Marlon M. Bailey’s book.
UM Press

What is “Ballroom Culture”? Well, a surface definition might be a culture that centers on a competition where black LGBT individuals dress, dance and vogue - competing for prizes and trophies.

But there is more to Ballroom Culture as my next guest spells out in his new book "Butch Queens Up In Pumps: Gender, Performance and Ballroom Culture in Detroit.”

Marlon Bailey is an Associate Professor of Gender Studies and American Studies at Indiana University. And he brings another perspective to his writing -- that of a black gay man who grew up in Detroit and who was deeply involved in Ballroom Culture.

Listen to the interview above.

Politics & Culture
3:00 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, December 19th, 2013

There are currently more than 45,000 people in prison in Michigan, but most of us will not experience what life is like behind bars. On today's show, we spoke with prisoners at the Michigan State Prison in Jackson to get their perspectives on life in our state.

And, then, later in the hour one of our favorite writers joined us. Keith Taylor gives us his picks for winter-time reads.

First up we talk with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes. In less than two weeks, Detroit will have a new mayor. Mike Duggan's term begins January first. Outgoing Mayor Dave Bing has been making his "farewell tour" around Detroit. What is the Bing legacy? And what might we expect from his successor?

Stateside
4:39 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

We check in with those in Michigan looking for health insurance

Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

It was October 1 when the Healthcare.gov website opened for business.The rocky launch of the public portal to the Affordable Care Act has consumed much of the nation's attention and news space.

The December 23 enrollment deadline is at hand. That's when you have to have signed up if you want a policy by January 1.

We wanted to see if the consumer experience with Healthcare.gov has improved - see what problems remain - and find out how many of us have been able to complete applications and actually select a marketplace plan.

Don Hazaert joined us today. He's the director of Michigan Consumers for Healthcare. It's one of four navigator agencies in our state for the Affordable Care Act.

You can find the agencies here.

Hazaert said, no question, there have been significant frustrations with the enrollment process, but that has changed since December 1. The Healthcare.gov website is working much better. Hazaert says those people who have signed up since December 1 have had a much smoother experience, especially those signing up with a new account.

Navigators are still trying to work with those individuals who started the process prior to December 1. We asked so of our listeners about their experiences with signing up for health care coverage.

Tom is 57 and lives in Ann Arbor and has been out of work for a year and a half. He's been paying for health insurance out of pocket for himself and his wife. It's been very expensive. His insurance company helped him sign up on Healthcare.gov. He received a subsidy to help him cover his costs. His online experience was good. 

"The price of the new policy is about half the price of the old policy and the deductible is about half as well, so I'm in a win-win situation as far as that's concerned," said Tom.

Diane Kay is 33-year-old attorney from Brighton, MI. She had a job change and hasn't been insured since 2007. She has a pre-existing condition so insurance companies wouldn't cover her, or it was prohibitively expensive. She's still paying back a lot of debt she incurred from a stay in the hospital. She got insurance through Healthcare.gov in November and said the process was not difficult.

Sasha Acker is 22-year-old social worker from Kalamazoo. She works part-time and doesn't get insurance from the company she works for. She had an extremely frustrating experience with Healthcare.gov, but was eventually able to sign up for coverage. She's excited to have insurance but has not been able to log back in to make her first payment. 

"I called in about six times, and they told me basically that since they made a bunch of upgrades to the website some of the accounts got corrupted and people can't access them anymore. Nobody has a solution for me," said Acker.

Don Hazaert with Michigan Consumers for Healthcare says Acker will need to make a payment before the start of the New Year to get her insurance.

He says her frustration is most likely with the 800 number she's calling and that he suggests she get in touch with a health care navigator in Michigan.

Hazaert says in 2014, they look forward to moving the conversation away from a troubled website to the benefits of the Affordable Care Act.

*This story was informed by the Public Insight Network.

Stateside
4:34 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Latest survey tells us how many of our teens actually smoke, drink, and take drugs

The University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research has been conducting this study for 36 years.
United Nations Photo

How many of our teens actually smoke, drink, and take drugs? And what kinds of drugs and tobacco products are they using?

That's what the University of Michigan and the National Institute on Drug Abuse seek to learn in their annual surveys of 40,000 to 50,000 teens in grades 8, 10, and 12.

The latest Monitoring The Future survey was released today.

Lloyd Johnston, the principal investigator for the project, joined us today. He’s with the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research.

Politics & Culture
4:27 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, December 18th, 2013

On today's program, a major new study  finds attitudes about drinking, drugs and tobacco are changing among teens, and some of the results might surprise you. Then later in the hour, a new group is trying to make Michigan's Legislature go part-time. Forty-six other states have done it, should Michigan?

 But first, it was October first when the healthcare.gov website opened for business. The rocky launch of the public portal to the Affordable Care Act has consumed much of the nation's attention and news space. The December 23 enrollment deadline is at hand. We wanted to see if the consumer experience with Healthcare.gov has improved - see what problems remain - and find out how many of us have been able to complete applications, and actually select a marketplace plan.  Don Hazaert, the director of Michigan Consumers for Healthcare, joined us today. It's one of four navigator agencies in our state for the Affordable Care Act.

Read more
Stateside
3:54 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

One group believes switching to a part-time Legislature will be good for Michigan

Norm Kammeraad is the Chairman of the Committee to Restore Michigan’s Part-Time Legislature.
Screenshot parttimemi.com

Should Michigan revert to the kind of legislature originally called for when Michigan voters drafted the first constitution in 1835?  A part-time legislature? 

Norm Kammeraad says absoluetly, yes.

He is the Chairman of The Committee to Restore Michigan’s Part-Time Legislature. They’re hoping to gather nearly 400,000 voter signatures between January and June in order to put the question on the November 2014 ballot.

Yesterday, we spoke with Michigan columnist Dennis Lennox. He is against a part-time Michigan Legislature. You can find that interview here

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:43 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

It's time to unplug during the holidays

The judge who caught the juror says it's a problem that is likely to get worse.
Alton Creative Commons

Here we are, one week away from Christmas, and two weeks away from the New Year.

The folks who work retail are busy, busy, busy, but many other workplaces are going to see a mayor "thinning of the ranks" as we take our holiday breaks.

But, how much of break will we really get? Yes, we may be sitting at home, or out of town at Grandma's. But, there is that Great Big Umbilical Cord that connects us with the office: technology!

The smart phones, email, iPads, laptops they all keep us tethered to work. What's that "constant connectivity" really doing to us?

We're joined by Sarita Schoenebeck, an assistant professor in the School of Information at the University of Michigan.

Stateside
3:35 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Michigan musicians record Christmas CD to support children in need

It's December. That means the airwaves are filled with Holly Jolly Christmases, White Christmases, Jingle Bell Rock and that ever-present Little Drummer Boy.

So, in the interest of public service, we thought we'd present a way for you to hear some fresh holiday music, performed by Michigan artists. The CD is called "A Michigan Christmas of Hope."

Holy Cross Children's Services will receive every penny of money raised from the CD. It's one of the largest private providers of specialized schools and children's services in Michigan.

Devin Scillian is best known as the anchor on WDIV-TV in Detroit. But, he's also built quite a following as a singer-songwriter. And, joining Devin is Russ Russell of Holy Cross Children's Services. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Education
5:13 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Why the quality of life for Michigan's children is stagnating

The quality of life for Michigan's children is not doing so great, according to the Kids Count report.
toshibatelecom toshibatelecom

Michigan's economy may be slogging its way up the hill towards recovery, but life is not getting as good as it should for children in our state.

That's the takeaway from the latest Kids Count report.

Here to tell us more is Jane Zehnder-Merrell. She's the project director for Kids Count in Michigan, part of the Michigan League for Public Policy.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
5:11 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

How one author cut $1,000 from his monthly budget... and made it work

Could you cut $1000 from your monthly budget?
wikimedia commons

For many of us, the word “budget” is not on our favorite words list.

But as so many of us across Michigan discovered during the Great Recession, things can get mighty scary when there's a crunch and we don't have much in the piggy bank.

Detroit News Personal Finance Editor Brian O'Connor writes the "Funny Money" column, offering financial advice to his readers. During the Great Recession, Brian and his family felt the pinch. So he decided to find out if his family could cut its monthly expenses by $1,000. He has turned his experiment  into a new book  “The One-Thousand Dollar Challenge: How One Family Slashed Its Budget Without Moving Under a Bridge or Living on Government Cheese."

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
5:09 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

What do local leaders think about right to work?

Right-to-work protestors outside the State Capitol last December.
david_shane Flickr

It was certainly a fiery, emotional scene at the State Capitol a year ago this month.

That's when the lame-duck Legislature and Governor Snyder rammed through the right-to-work law, and Michigan became the 24th right-to-work state.

The laws took effect in March, making it illegal to force workers to pay union dues as a condition of employment.

So what do our local government leaders think about right to work?

Read more
Stateside
5:07 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Republican strategist says switching to a part-time Legislature would not be good for Michigan

The State Capitol.
Matthileo Flickr

Starting next month, the Committee to Restore Michigan's Part-Time Legislature says they will be looking for your signatures. They've got six months to gather 400,000 voter signatures to get a big question on the November 2014 ballot: Should we amend Michigan's Constitution to switch our state to a part-time Legislature?

We'll be looking at both sides of this idea. Today we welcome a Republican strategist who believes this proposal is not in the best interest of Michigan.

Dennis Lennox is a columnist for The Morning Sun and a public affairs consultant.

Listen to the full interview above.

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