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Stateside
5:23 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Lawmakers poised to expand Education Achievement Authority in Michigan

Michigan Capitol Building, Lansing, Michigan
Thetoad Flickr

The state House has approved a measure to expand the controversial Education Achievement Authority. The EAA is the agency that is supposed to turn around some of the state’s most struggling school districts.

A final version of the bill could be voted on as early as this week by the state Senate and sent to Gov. Snyder for his signature.

The legislation passed the House last week by just one more vote than was needed.

Critics of the EAA, mostly Democrats, say student test results don’t support putting more schools into the authority.

Supporters, mainly Republican, say the legislation allows for more tools to be used to turn around failing schools.

Kathy Gray has been covering the EAA for the Detroit Free Press, and she joined us today.

Listen to the interview above.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Would year-round schools work in Michigan?

Lockers in a Flint school.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

Some at-risk schools in Michigan could soon get more state funding if they agree to go year-round.

In his budget address in February, Gov. Snyder called for a state pilot program to encourage year-round schooling. School districts could get money to add air conditioning and other upgrades to old buildings so they could operate during the summer.

Supporters of the measure say students lose a lot of what they learn during the school year after long summer breaks.

State Rep. Andy Schor, D-Lansing, is sponsoring year-round education legislation. He says teachers have to reeducate students in September and October.

“You could have 30 and even up to 60 of the 180 days of kids relearning what they should already know,” said Schor.

But do these measures actually work?

Harris Cooper is professor and the chair of the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. He joined us today to share his thoughts.

Listen to the interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:21 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, March 20th, 2014

The Justice Department is investigating General Motors for delaying a recall of more than a million and a half cars. On today's show: how is this recall affecting GM's reputation?

And, a new Michigan law will now allow you to literally BYOB, bring you own bottle of wine to a restaurant.

Also, starting a business can be hard, but what about starting a business with a mission to help end homelessness? That's exactly what the Empowerment Plan aims to do. 

First on the show, Rick Pluta, Captiol Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network and co-host of It's Just Politics, joined us to talk about how Lansing plans to spend surplus money.

Stateside
5:19 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

New law allows you to bring your own wine to Michigan restaurants

Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

A new Michigan law will now allow you to literally BYOB, bring your own bottle of wine to a restaurant. Chris is the Chief Restaurant Critic and Wine Writer at Hour Magazine, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:41 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Rick Pluta talks about money and March Madness

It costs a lot of money to go to college.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

An interview with Rick Pluta.

There is almost a billion dollars worth of state surplus. Should the state spend it or give it back to taxpayers? Should we get a rebate, or should that money be put towards fixing roads and helping schools? And what about the Detroit bankruptcy? 

Also, March Madness is upon us. President Obama chose Michigan State to win the NCAA basketball championship. But who did Governor Snyder pick?

Rick Pluta, Captiol Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network and co-host of It's Just Politics, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:25 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Daniel Howes on the General Motors recall crisis

General Motors headquarters.
user paul (dex) Flickr

An interview with Daniel Howes, business columnist at the Detroit News.

It was announced yesterday that Toyota has agreed to pay $1.2 billion to settle with the U.S. Justice Department over a delayed recall of millions of vehicles.

The Justice Department is also investigating General Motors for delaying a recall of more than 1.5 million cars. The cars have defective ignition switches that can turn the car off at high speeds.

There's also news that GM executives are being summoned to D.C. to face Congressional inquiries.

Daniel Howes, business columnist at the Detroit News, joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
2:54 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Singer-songwriter shares his story of failure: releasing his 1st album

http://failure-lab.com/

The audio for Dwele's Failure:Lab story

Failure:Lab is an event that's been happening in Michigan and is spreading outside the state.

It's a program designed to get us thinking about the meaning of failure, to realize that failure happens to everyone and perhaps to inspire us to take intelligent risks.

You can see our past Failure:Lab posts here. And on April 1, you can hear Michigan State University Athletic Director Mark Hollis and other Failure:Lab speakers talk about their experiences at MSU's Wharton Center. More on that here

Today we heard from Andwele Gardner.

Andwele Gardner, better known by his stage name Dwele, is a singer-songwriter and record producer from Detroit. He's released six albums including his last Greater Than One. He was featured on multiple Kanye West tracks and brought his vintage soul to the stage once again – to share a story behind the songs.

This is the story that Dwele shared at Failure:Lab Detroit on November 21, 2013 at the Detroit Opera House.

Stateside
2:12 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

PTSD becomes first mental-health disorder approved for medical marijuana use

Marijuana plants.
A7nubis Creative Commons

An interview with Jake Neher, the Capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network.

Michigan residents suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder will now be able to get medical marijuana, marking the first mental-health disorder approved for medical marijuana use.

The decision came yesterday, as the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs signed off on the proposal from the Michigan Medical Marihuana Review panel.

As Michigan Public Radio Network’s Jake Neher explains, the decision is the result of months of deliberation.

How will the decision affect veterans who apply for federal benefits? Is Lansing considering adding other conditions to the issue?

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
2:08 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Defective ignition switches are creating a crisis for General Motors

GM and the NHTSA are urging owners of the recalled GM vehicles to "use only the ignition key with nothing else on the key ring."
NHTSA

An interview with NPR's Sonari Glinton and Jack Nerad, vice president of Kelly Blue Book.

Last month, General Motors recalled 1.6 million vehicles because of faulty ignition switches linked to 13 deaths and at least 31 crashes.

That has grown into that biggest crisis GM has faced in years, and an early and severe test for its new chief, Mary Barra.

Yesterday she released a video making a public apology:

“Something went wrong with our process in this instance and terrible things happened. As a member of the GM family and as a mom with a family of my own, this really hits home for me. And we have apologized. But that is just one step in the journey to resolve this.”

Also yesterday, the automaker announced another recall: more than 1.7 million vehicles in three new campaigns.

Read more
Environment & Science
3:31 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

How are robins faring this winter?

Should we be worried about robins this winter?
Wikipedia.org

If you grew up in Michigan, chances are when you thought of the very first signs of spring you thought of crocuses and robins. 

But have you noticed that in recent years, something has changed– that robins are pretty much with us all through the winter?

Why has this happened, and do we have any reason to worry about robins in this exceptionally harsh winter?

Julie Craves, director of the Rouge River Bird Observatory in Dearborn, joined us. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Health
3:30 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Obamacare deadline closes in; health officials to target obesity

Health officials to target Michigan's obesity under Obamacare.
Andrian Clark Flickr

March 31 looms ever closer.

That's the deadline for you to get health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. After then, you'll only be able to get insurance on the health care exchange when there's a big change in your life: a birth, divorce, death, losing your employer-sponsored insurance, or moving to another state.

The latest numbers show 144,586 people in Michigan have gotten health insurance under Obamacare.

And, with more people covered, doctors and hospitals are expecting an uptick in treating one of our state's biggest health challenges: obesity. 

We're joined by Heather Howard, program director of the State Health Reform Assistance Network. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
3:29 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Bottle Michigan's bounty, lawmaker urges

New bill encourages bringing Michigan products from the farm into your glass.
Vistavision Flickr

Get those fruits and grains straight out of the Michigan farm field, and right into a bottle of Michigan beer, wine, mead or cider. 

That's the idea behind a bill introduced in Michigan's House by state Rep. Doug Geiss, D-Taylor. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
3:28 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

UAW awaits answer on intimidation claims at VW plant

Volkswagen Plant in Tennessee.
Richard Bartz Wikimedia Commons

It has been a little over a month since a closely watched vote at Volkswagen's plant in Chattanooga, Tenn. By a very close margin, hourly workers at the plant said no to having the UAW represent them.

But that is not the end of things at the VW plant. The UAW appealed the results of the National Labor Relations Board, because of what the union calls a campaign of intimidation by outsiders, including an apparent promise from Tennessee's senator – a promise that has yet to materialize. 

Detroit News Washington Bureau Chief David Shepardson joins us today. 

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
10:48 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Kevyn Orr reflects on his past year as Detroit's Emergency Manager

Kevyn Orr was appointed Emergency Manager one year ago tomorrow.
Michigan Radio

An interview with Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes.

It's Thursday. Time for our weekly check-in with Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes.

It’s hard to believe it will be one year ago tomorrow that Kevyn Orr was appointed Detroit's Emergency Manager. Orr sat down to talk to the Detroit News. What does he say about these past 12 months?

Daniel Howes joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
12:29 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

The Abortion Insurance Opt-Out Act takes effect tomorrow; what can we expect?

Marianne Udow-Phillips
user mudowp Twitter

It was late last year that state lawmakers passed The Abortion Insurance Opt-Out Act.

Starting this Friday, insurance companies will not be allowed to sell policies that include abortion coverage as a standard feature.

Customers would have to buy separate add-ons, riders, to cover abortion and they would have to do it before ever knowing whether they will want to obtain an abortion.

And how that might or might not happen is pretty confusing.

Marianne Udow-Phillips is with the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation, and she joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:40 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, March 12, 2014

A decision on the legal challenge to Michigan’s ban on same-sex marriage is expected by the end of next week.

Yes, there has been much debate in federal court about whether same-sex couples should be allowed to marry, but what about homosexuality in religious institutions?

Today, on Stateside just how open should churches be when it comes to embracing gays and lesbians.

Then, prisoners in Michigan share their profound life experiences through poems, essays and short stories. That story later this hour.

But first, 95 years ago, the Detroit Institute of Arts was in deep financial trouble. It kept the doors open by turning over the building and its art to the thriving City of Detroit in exchange for annual funding. And now it stands, poised to flip that arrangement upside down, hoping to cut Detroit's ownership of the DIA in order to protect its treasures from hungry creditors.

There's quite a long and complicated history between the DIA and the City.

Detroit Free Press writer Mark Stryker recently explored this giving us the past, present and the future of the DIA's predicament.

Stateside
4:25 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Why this guy is pitching Detroit at SXSW festival in Austin

A screenshot from Lowe Campbell Ewald video.
Lowe Campbell Ewald video. YouTube.

The South by Southwest festival is happening right now in Austin, Texas. It's where the cutting edge of music, technology and new thinking all come together.

And that's where our next guest has been busy pitching Detroit to all those creative entrepreneurs. Earlier this week, he hosted a session called "We're Moving to Detroit, and So Should You."

Iain Lanivich is the digital creative director of Lowe Campbell Ewald, and he joins us from Austin.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:25 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Meet Heywood Banks: Michigan comedian, lover of toast

Comedian Heywood Banks
Heywood Banks

One of Michigan's big contributions to the world of comedy is Heywood Banks.

Whether he's playing his guitar or his trusty toaster, he's made audiences laugh all over the country.

He's appeared on A&E, MTV, and Entertainment Tonight. And he was the MC for both nights of the 2012 Ann Arbor Folk Festival.

He'll be playing at The Ark on March 15; he joined us today on Stateside.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:25 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Giving a voice to prisoners: Michigan's Prison Creative Arts Project

The cover of the sixth annual Michigan Review of Prisoner Creative Writing.
PCAP University of Michigan

Just because you've been found guilty of a crime and sentenced to prison, doesn't mean you no longer have a voice, an opinion, something to say.

And that's why each year the Prison Creative Arts Project puts out the call to prisoners all around Michigan: Send us your poetry, your essays, your short stories.

PCAP goes through each submission and selects work to go into its annual Michigan Review of Prisoner Creative Writing.  They're about to release their sixth volume. This one is called "The Sky Is On Fire, After All."

Philip Christman edits the Review, and he's an English Department instructor at the University of Michigan. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:24 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

How one Michigan church is changing its views on gay marriage

A gay pride flag.
antiochla.edu Antioch University

There can be little doubt that we are living at a time when our attitudes as a society are undergoing a tremendous shift in what we think of individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender.

Recently, we spoke on this show with Michigan State University professor Charley Ballard, who directs the state of the state surveys. The most recent MSU survey found, for instance, that 54% of Michiganders support gay marriage, with 36% opposing it.

Just four years ago, gay marriage was opposed by 51% and favored by 48% of those surveyed.

That is the view from social science. But what about the view from the pulpit?

Ken Wilson is pastor of Vineyard Church of Ann Arbor. The evangelical minister has spent years wrestling with this question:  Where do we – as a Christian faith community – draw the line on the gay marriage issue?

His journey to rethinking his beliefs about where LBGT people fit into what he calls “the company of Jesus” is spelled out in his new book “A Letter to my Congregation:  An evangelical pastor's path to embracing people who are gay, lesbian and transgender into the company of Jesus.”

Listen to the full interview above. 

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