Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside: 

  • Investigative reporter Lester Graham is ready to blow the whistle on this season's political ads.
  • How about new businesses in Detroit? And we're not talking Cars or Shinola, but a vegan Coney Island.
  • Morning in America to criminal three-strikes laws, we use analogies every day. But we hardly pay much attention to them.
  • It's been sad trumpet sounds for University of Michigan football lately.
  • Emergency managers are allowed to stay in power for 18 months under Michigan's emergency management law.

*Listen to the full show above.

 

A recent report says you will see one political ad every two minutes on television in Michigan.

Michigan Radio's Lester Graham has been working with Bridge Magazine's Truth Squad, looking at how truthful political ads are this election cycle. Graham says one of the misconceptions of political ads is to believe that those ads don't lie.

In fact, FCC has rules in place that forbid broadcasters from challenging or changing a political candidate's ad. That gives the candidates freedom to say things that could have little resemblance to the truth. 

Kevyn Orr
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

 

Eighteen months is how long emergency managers are allowed to stay in power under Michigan's emergency management law. It has now been 18 months that Kevyn Orr has been in charge of Detroit's finances.

There have been closed-door meetings between Mayor Mike Duggan and Detroit City Council this week, talking about Orr's future.

Michigan Radio's Detroit reporter Sarah Cwiek says the meeting has been working on the transition process but specific details are still unknown. 

Detroit Free Press columnist Nancy Kaffer says Orr has been walking a fine line, and his current situation is a strange place to be.

*Listen to our conversation with Sarah Cwiek and Nancy Kaffer above.

Detroit skyline.
user JSFauxtaugraphy / Flickr

 

Here are some easy-a** ways to make money in Detroit. 

That was the headline on a recent Jalopnik blog by Aaron Foley. He says he wants to offer up his ideas for all Detroiters who want to make money, but don't want to spend too much. 

Some of these ideas and Foley's own explanation:

  • A gay bar inside of a firehouse – "No brainer! There are so many empty firehouses."
  • A vegan Coney Island – "Not what I would personally want, but ...what better place to experience different food styles in Detroit than the Coney Island?"
  • An agency that teaches new Detroiters not to be offensive – "Sometimes folks just don't know how to talk to a black or Latino person without sounding dense."

* Listen to our conversation with Aaron Foley above.

 

The stands are thinning out.
User: larrysphatpage / Flickr

 

John U. Bacon joined Stateside to talk about University of Michigan football and head coach Brady Hoke. 

Bacon says it hasn't been much fun for the Wolverines on the field, with eight losses out of the last 12 games. However, Bacon adds it has been even less fun off the field, with the stands increasingly empty.

"What I'm seeing in Michigan fans is they are upset that they are not upset, that they are alarmed by their lack of alarm. What I'm seeing now is something I haven't seen before – that is indifference," says Bacon.

* Listen to our conversation with John U. Bacon above.

 

John Pollack says it's important to tell true analogies from false ones.
user: RCB / Flickr

We use analogies every day. Yet we rarely think about them. They're just part of our vocabulary and our speech. 

But for John Pollack, analogies are not something to be ignored.

Pollack is the author of the new book Shortcut: How Analogies Reveal Connection, Spark Innovation and Sell Our Greatest Ideas. He believes analogies often have big consequences on how we view the world.

For example, Pollack says there are a lot of analogies that ring true that actually turn out not to be true. 

Pollack mentions the case of the "domino theory" President Eisenhower used in 1954.

The analogy convinced Americans that if they didn't intervene in Vietnam, democratic governments across Southeast Asia would topple like dominoes.

While the analogy translated something complex and far away into everyday language, it falsified the situation: When U.S. forces withdrew from Hanoi in defeat, the neighboring countries didn't topple like dominoes.

Today on Stateside:

  • Term limits were passed by Michigan voters more than 20 years ago. Now, Republican Senate Leader Randy Richardville is ready to change that.
  • There are food decathlons and celebrity chefs today, but when did food become entertainment?!
  • A bad movie gets a bad review. But a bad bottle of wine? Not so much.
  • Six weeks from today will mean the beginning of the state's lame-duck legislative session. What are we going to see this year?
  • The 4th Annual Detroit Design Festival is taking place this week in the city with over 60 events.
  • In 80 to 90 years, Detroit could see a huge trend of people moving in because of climate change, according to an environment expert.

* Listen to the full show above.

The green acid-washed chair by Mobel Link.
User: Detroit Design Festival / Facebook

The 4th Annual Detroit Design Festival is taking place this week in the city with over 60 events.

Sam Moschelli is the sponsorship director at the Detroit chapter of the American Institute of Architects – the group putting on an event this Thursday evening at Eastern Market. Moschelli says he believes there are opportunities for both creating new and revitalizing old.

"The golden age of Detroit was in the 1920s and 1930s. We were known as the 'Paris of the Midwest.' People used to come here to study architecture and to understand the buildings of the era. That building stock is some of our most important resources that we have in the region," says Moschelli.

Detroit by Design event producer Rich Rice says the opportunity and energy that the city offers for artists are catching lots of attention internationally. 

"People talk about the arts movements. The older creatives say back in the 1980s in New York .... [Detroit] feels a lot like what was going on there," says Rice

*Listen to our conversation with Sam Moschelli and Rich Rice above.

User: Raul Lieberwirth / Flickr

A bad movie gets a bad review. But a bad bottle of wine? Not so much.

Critic Chris Cook of Hour Detroit magazine was recently asked why he doesn’t write about bad wine. 

"I just think there's too much out there that's good these days to be concentrating on a lot of the bad stuff. In the wine world in particular, the technology has gotten so good that the wines are much much better than they used to be," Cook responded.

He also says judgment on wine could be questionable when personal tastes come in. 

As the fall gets underway, Cook is excited about the lighter style red wine such as pinot noir. 

For Thanksgiving, Cook is looking forward to inky wines instead, like Malbec.

*Listen to the full interview with Chris Cook above.

User: M P R / Flickr

 

When did food become entertainment? There are celebrity chefs and television stations devoted to food 24 hours a day and dozens of slick magazines all about food.

Recently the Fifth Third Ballpark made news for hosting a "Food Decathlon" where you got a punch card and were rewarded by eating all the food, including "The Baco," which is a taco with a bacon shell.

Margot Finn focuses on food studies at the University of Michigan. She says food has always been both a form of nutrition and a form of entertainment, but there has been a rise of popular interest in food since around the late 1970s. 

User: memories_by_mike / Flickr

As an article in the New York Times put it this week, “Alaskans stay in Alaska. People in the Midwest and the Pacific Northwest: sit tight.” That’s the message from climate change researchers, who are predicting what places in the U.S. will be hit hardest by climate change.

It looks like the Midwest will be all right, relatively speaking.

Matthew Kahn is a professor at the UCLA Institute of Environment. He says that in 80 or 90 years, Detroit could be seeing a huge trend of people moving in – because of climate change.

"If rainfall really stops falling in the Southwest, and we don't come up with ways to allocate water efficiently, you're going to see millions of households and thousands of firms looking across the United States for better, less risky places to live. And the Midwest might compete very well there, just as it has in the past," says Kahn. 

*Listen to our conversation with Matthew Kahn above.

Michigan Legislature
Michigan Municipal League

Six weeks from today, we'll be going through November's election results. Michigan will have a new U.S. Senator and voters will have either given Gov. Rick Snyder another term or elected Democrat Mark Schauer to take over the job.

Six weeks from today will also mean the beginning of the state's lame duck legislative session. Lame duck – the period of time time after the November election but before a new year, begins with many new lawmakers. 

The last lame duck session of the Michigan Legislature brought the passage of Right to Work. What are we going to see this year?

Rick Pluta is bureau chief of the Michigan Public Radio Network and co-host of Michigan Radio's "It's Just Politics." He says there are suspicions that something will come out of the blue. 

Michigan Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville, R-Monroe.
Photo courtesy of Richardville's office

There's been talk in Lansing about whether term limits should be extended, and that talk is heating up. 

Michigan voters approved term limits for state lawmakers back in 1992, but Republican Sen. Majority Leader Randy Richardville thinks maybe it's time they are extended.

Richardville says Michigan has the most restrictive term limits in the country. Other states have either rescinded or eased term limits and, he believes Michigan should review the legislation as well.

Jack Lessenberry is Michigan Radio's political analyst, and he says term limits have been an unmitigated disaster. 

user hyperboreal / Flickr

If you're not sure how long it's been since we've had 10 days in a row of gorgeous, sunny warm weather, MLive meterologist Mark Torregrossa has figured it out for you: four years.

Torregrossa was a guest on "Stateside with Cynthia Canty" today to talk about the gorgeous fall weather we're going to have.

He says this next stretch will see cooler mornings, with temperatures in the 40-50 degree range, with afternoons warming up into the 70s. 

As for fall foliage, you might want to move fast: Torregrossa says the leaves are about a week ahead of schedule, with peak color happening right now in the western Upper Peninsula. 

Flickr Creative Commons / No known copyright

Listen up, husbands.

It turns out the way your wife feels about your marriage is a pretty good indicator of how you’ll feel about life in general.

If she’s happy, you’re happy.

If she’s not, good luck.

Those are the findings of a new study from both Rutgers and University of Michigan sociologists.

“There’s a lot of research showing one of the biggest predictors of happiness is actually being happily married,” says Deborah Carr, professor of sociology at Rutgers University.

But she and fellow researcher Vicky Freedman, of the University of Michigan, wanted to go a little deeper than that.

“Most of this research, if not all of this research, focuses on only one partner in the marriage: They look to see whether your marital satisfaction was linked with your overall happiness,” says Carr.

“But what was missing was a partner’s view on the marriage, and so that was really our point of departure. We know that husbands and wives often give very different assessments of their marriage,” she laughs.

So they studied responses from older couples: Both partners were over the age of 50, and at least one partner was 60 or older.

On this first full-day of Fall, we are in for some perfect autumn-weather.

It might be the one time where saying "Michigan weather" actually means a good thing.

We also go hunting for enormous mushrooms;  we learn about new research that finds truth in the saying “happy wife, happy life”;  we talk about cultures assimilating in Detroit; and we hear how the Cass Community United Methodist Church has been helping the poor since the 1930s.

But first on the show, we talked about campaign ads.

With the November election now six weeks away, the campaign ads are ever present.

If you wonder just who's picking up the tab for the ads, particularly the issue-oriented ads, that answer is pretty hard to find in Michigan. Political spending rules allow quite a lack of transparency.

Some say this leads to corruption. Others disagree. Chris Gautz of Crain's Detroit Business has been talking with both sides.

The Michigan Mushroom Hunters Club "Mushroom of the Month" - the Boletus variipes.
MMHC

There may be folks grumbling about the cool, wet end of summer we've had, but not the “shroomers.”

Mushroom hunters are having a blast with a bumper crop of wild mushrooms.

Philip Tedeschi is president of the Michigan Mushroom Hunters Club.

"Fall has been starting out very good. This summer, the chanterelles and black trumpets and some of my favorite mushrooms come up then," said Tedeschi.

"Right now, the hen of the woods are starting. Hen of the woods is a mushroom that averages about three pounds. The ones I pick are typically one to five pounds. In our club, someone brought in a 42-pounder."

Tedeschi says the record for this mushroom weighs in at more than 100 pounds, from Pennsylvania.

Mushrooms love wet, cool weather.

“Mushrooms are even higher percentage water than animals. They need the water to grow. (In) a dry year we won’t see very many mushrooms at all,” he said.

*Listen to our interview with Tedeschi above.

mconnors / morgueFile

Is there anyone who hasn't scanned the radio dial on a long road trip and endured noisy static,  angry talk shows, and music that disappoints  in a desperate search for a classic rock station?

But who knew the classic rock concept was born in Michigan almost 30 years ago?

Fred Jacobs, an Oakland County-based radio consultant, was part of that birth in 1985. He said WMMQ in Charlotte, Michigan, was the first classic rock station, and the format quickly spread across the country.

Jacobs said he was inspired by complaints from listeners who couldn't find the music they had grown up with and loved. 

Jacobs said classic rock is not the same as "golden oldies." It is about the golden age of rock – music people will still be listening to in 100 years. 

Jacobs said classic rock started with music from the 60s and 70s and musicians like the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Who, and Eric Clapton. 

But he said it's all about the music of your youth that you never get tired of hearing.  And as generations move on, classic rock has added 80s and even more recent music to its roster.

More than $50 billion. That's how much Lansing will spend this year. But how to get everyone to agree on where to spend that money. That's where things get interesting.

Today on Stateside, we talked about the fight over taxing and spending.

Also today - Michigan's Freedom of Information Act regulates the disclosure of public records by all public bodies in the state - or so says the State Attorney General's Office in a pamphlet explaining the law.

But, just a few lines down is something that many citizens may not be aware of: the "public body" does not include the governor's office - or the lieutenant governor - or their employees.

Reporter Paul Egan took a look at Michigan's public records law in yesterday's Detroit Free Press.

We also talked about how one band worked Spotify to pay for their tour, the history of the classic rock format, and who owns the Great Lakes.

Vulfpeck

We’ve heard it before. The music industry is changing.

But the band Vulfpeck is challenging the music industry with silence.

Vulfpeck is a funk band that got its start at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

They are in the middle of a cross-country tour.

They aren’t charging admission, they aren’t paying out of pocket.

Their tour is completely funded from an album they put up on the online music steaming service Spotify – an album that was completely silent.

Today on Stateside:

  •  We found out how one Michigan college succeeds at recruiting and graduating low-income students.
  • Why GM can't put the ignition-switch scandal in its rear-view mirror.
  • Our sports commentator digested the late-season roller-coaster ride for Tigers fans.
  • U.S. Sen. Carl Levin is retiring this year. Why does his exit make the corporate world exhale?
  • A conversation with Michigan author Julie Lawson Timmer about her debut novel: "Five Days Left."

*Listen to the full show above.

Kalamazoo College campus
user: Kalamazoo College / facebook

 

When it comes to recruiting and graduating low-income students, one school that is clearly getting it right is Kalamazoo College.

The New York Times ranks Kalamazoo College No. 12 in the nation among elite colleges that enroll a large percentage of PELL-grant eligible students.

The PELL grant is a solid indicator, since many students in families above the poverty level do not qualify for these grants.

Eileen Wilson-Oyelaran is president of Kalamazoo College. She says attracting and keeping low-income students have been a priority of the college and part of its institutional mission: 

User: Adam Wyles / Flickr

 

What goes through the mind of someone who is just worn out from battling a terrible debilitating disease? Someone who has decided the time has come to end her life?

Or the mind of a caring man who opened his home and his heart to a child in great need, only to have the court order that child to be returned to his mother when she gets out of prison?

And how do the lives of these two people intersect?

Those questions drive a new novel "Five Days Left" by Michigan author Julie Lawson Timmer.

Derek DeVries / Grand Rapids Community College

 

Some of America's top business leaders are breathing a big sigh of relief as Democratic U.S. Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan prepares to retire.

It turns out that Michigan's senior senator has been running a very tight ship in chairing a Senate subcommittee that's done some deep probing into the workings of some very big businesses.

The Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, or PSI, was created back in Harry Truman's time to investigate war profit hearings. Today, the organization looks into practices in government and business. 

Kelsey Snell wrote a piece about it for Politico. She notes that the subcommittee chaired by Levin has a big focus on going after tax evasions and unfair business practices on Wall Street.

J.D. Martinez crushed a two-run blast in Saturday's victory over the Indians.
User: Detroit Tigers / facebook

 

The waning weeks of the regular baseball season have turned into a real roller-coaster ride for the Tigers and their fans.

The Tigers got clobbered by the Twins last night, losing 8-4. And Kansas City won, so that American League Central Division lead is down to just a half game over the Royals. Now the Tigers head to Kansas City for three games that could be the most important series of the season.

Michigan Radio's sports commentator John U. Bacon says as of now, the Tigers' chance to make it into the playoffs is 91%, according to ESPN. 

There are 10 games still ahead of the team.

* Listen to the interview with John U. Bacon above.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

When General Motors appointed Kenneth Feinberg as its so-called "compensation czar," it was clear the automaker hoped to have Feinberg determine damages to victims of the ignition-switch debacle, pay, and move on.

But as Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes writes today, things are not working out that way:

User: COD Newsroom / Flickr

As college students explore their campuses, they're likely to find a wide array of student groups that pertain to race: The Black Student Union, Asian-American groups, or Hispanic and Latino groups.

Universities say they're spending time and money on trying to increase the number of minority students, especially since the Supreme Court ban in 2006 on affirmative action.

But Ron Haskins of the Brookings Institution says the challenges for American colleges should be not only racial diversity, but also economic diversity. 

Especially when universities, including elite schools, haven't upped their percentage of low-come students in generation. 

Haskins says that's what happens when colleges maintain admission standards.

Today on Stateside

  • Announcement of a new downtown arena for the Detroit Red Wings brought a flood of news stories, but we may not always ask the right questions. We found out why local media struggle when covering new stadium construction.
  • A debate in Michigan's Senate race is now in the planning stages.
  • We learned what's behind a growing grassroots movement to get the pope to visit Detroit in 2015.
  • We met the captain of the No.1-ranked team at the University of Michigan: Women's cross country.
  • A project team in Lapeer, Michigan, has a mission to make the downtown area more attractive, with decorated benches.
  • We learned about Louis Kamper, the gifted architect who helped Detroit earn a reputation as the "Paris of the West".

*Listen to the full show above.

Working on one of the benches
user: The Bench Warming Project / facebook

Can a brightly decorated bench make a downtown area more attractive?

A group of artists in Lapeer, Michigan says absolutely!

Artist Jim Alt belongs to the group. He has launched something he calls The Bench Warming Project in downtown Lapeer.

Alt says the goal of the project is to give downtown a collection of public artwork that hopefully could help bring people back to the community. 

He set a fundraising goal of $1,000 on gofundme.com.  So far, the project has raised more than $2,100.

Alt and his team of artists have finished 4 benches, and they expect to have a total of 21 benches done by next week or so.

*Listen to the full story above.

User: Michigan Women's Track and Field / facebook

Wolverine fans, here's a question for you: What is the best team on campus?

Take the spotlight off football and basketball for a minute, and shine it on the Wolverine team that is ranked No.1 in the nation. According to the NCAA, it's the Michigan Women's Cross-Country team.

Brook Handler of Rochester Hills is the team's captain. She says they train hard everyday and cheer each other on during races. 

"Everyone really really wants to get to that top spot, and the drive that this team has is tenfold what it was a few years ago," says Handler.

* Listen to our conversation with Brook Handler above.

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