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Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

How has NAFTA affected the auto industry in Michigan?

White House

We've been exploring the effects of NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, recently. NAFTA is 20 years old this year and has had dramatic effects on the state and U.S. economy.

What has NAFTA meant to the auto industry, in particular, the movement of companies and jobs to Mexico – companies and jobs that used to be based in Michigan?

We turned to Stateside's partners at the BBC for more information. BBC correspondent Luis Fajardo joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

University programs send students to Detroit communities

Detroit Skyline
JSFauxtaugraphy/Flickr

Getting college students out of their classrooms, out of the "academic bubble" and into communities, giving eager students an opportunity to take what they're learning and put it into practice, and, at the same time, hopefully help their communities certainly seem like a win-win for all sides.

And that's why students from Wayne State University and the University of Michigan are permeating the city of Detroit in many ways, through many programs.

We wanted to see what's been learned by all sides in these partnerships.

Jerry Herron, founding dean of the Honors College at Wayne State and UM professor Larry Gant joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:29 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Ann Arbor-based non-profit is dedicated to building links between homeless, 'homeful'

State law bans "begging in a public place."
Annie Green Springs Flickr

It's called "Mission A2" – short for Michigan Itinerant Shelter System Interdependent  Out of Necessity. This Ann Arbor-based nonprofit is dedicated to building links between homeless and what it calls "homeful" Washtenaw County residents. One of its key activities has been running a series of rotating tent cities for the homeless.

But now, Mission A2 is taking things to a new level. They're partnering to buy land and build a permanent settlement called Homeward Bound, a place for Ann Arbor's homeless to begin the process of rebuilding confidence and their lives.

Read more
Stateside
4:22 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Michigan still hasn't figured out how to get marijuana into the hands of registered patients

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette says opportunists have hijacked the state's medical marijuana industry.
kconnors MorgueFile

Medical marijuana is legal in Michigan. Voters overwhelmingly said "yes" to that in 2008.

But more than five years later, our state still hasn't figured out how best to get the cannabis into the hands of the more than 100,000 people who are registered as medical marijuana users.

In Mid-December, two bills were passed by the State House that made it easier for patients to buy medicinal cannabis. House Bill 5104 would permit manufacture and sale of non-smoking forms of medical marijuana – capsules, oil, brownies – which would help patients who have a hard time smoking the weed.

Read more
Offbeat
4:21 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Are stray animals taking over Detroit?

Researchers try to find the true number of stray animals in Detroit.
user: RTD Photography

The question of stray animals in the City of Detroit has been in the spotlight ever since Bloomberg News published a story painting Detroit as some place where "abandoned dogs roam in packs as humans dwindle." The article estimated the number of stray dogs at 50,000, a number that has turned out to be grossly inaccurate. 

Michigan State University political science professor Laura Reese has completed the first academic study of the problem, which hopes to shed light on the reality of the situation.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:21 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Proposals could impact students in every third-grade classroom in Michigan

3rd Grade Class
User: Old Shoe Woman Flickr

There is a two-bill package making its way through the state Legislature that could impact students in every third-grade classroom in Michigan.

It would hold back third-graders who have poor reading skills. If a child fails a third-grade reading exam, he or she does not move along to fourth grade.

Backers say it can help get a struggling student back on track. Critics say flunking that struggling student is a punishment. State Superintendent Mike Flanagan panned the legislation, saying it should be up to local schools and parents.

Amber Arellano is the executive director of the Education Trust-Midwest.

Stateside
4:20 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Belle Isle becomes Michigan's 102nd state park

Belle Isle's Scott Fountain.
demccain flickrriver

A new chapter has begun in the long history of Detroit's Belle Isle, which is transitioning to become Michigan's 102nd state park. 

The full change takes place today, as state park officials assume control of the park under the lease imposed by Detroit's emergency manager, Kevyn Orr. The move should save the city between $4 and $5 million a year. 

Starting today, motorists will need an $11 state recreation passport to enter the park. 

Detroit Free Press editorial editor Stephen Henderson joins us today to talk about what we can expect for the future of Belle Isle and the city of Detroit. 

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:20 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Is Australia's car manufacturing industry about to reach the end of the road?

GM and Chrysler suffered through bankruptcy in large part because it relied so heavily on SUV sales.
user ep_jhu Creative Commons

Ford and General Motors both recently decided to stop producing cars in Australia. Now, that country's car manufacturing industry is about to reach the end of the road. That's after today's announcement that Toyota will close its operations there as well.

Stateside's partner the BBC has more from business correspondent Russell Padmore.

Stateside
4:20 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Stateside for Monday, February 10, 2014

Belle Isle has become Michigan's 102nd State Park. What does this new chapter for Belle Isle mean for the city and people of Detroit?

Next, stray animals in Detroit are up for debate since a article by Bloomberg News put the number of strays at 50,000. A Michigan State University professor discusses the findings of her study on the problem. 

Read more
Stateside
5:15 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Free student-run medical clinics provide health care to uninsured

Michigan Health Insurance Program is offering more options to people with pre-existing conditions.
user striatic Flickr

It could happen in a field near an abandoned building in Detroit. Or a now-defunct library in a small rural town.

The locations may differ, but the mission is the same: medical students reaching out to provide health care to uninsured people.

The student-run free medical clinic is an outreach effort that’s offered by most medical schools. Usually, it’s staffed by first and second year med students who are responsible for virtually every aspect of the clinic. An M.D. is on hand to write prescriptions and confirm diagnoses. But it really is these med students who are giving most of the care.

What are the pros and cons of these free student-run clinics?

Jennifer Xu is a medical student at the University of Michigan. She recently wrote a piece for The Atlantic entitled “Letting Medical Students Run The Clinic.” She joined us today to tell us more about it.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:11 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Michigan fiber mill provides yarn for Olympic closing ceremonies sweaters

American athletes will be wearing these during the closing ceremonies.
Facebook

The Winter 2014 Olympics began today in Sochi, Russia. America's athletes will once again be sporting designs by Ralph Lauren.

 

What you might not know is that the sweaters and caps they'll be wearing for the closing ceremonies will be made from yarn produced in Michigan.

Debbie McDermott is a shepherd, a spinner and a fiber artist. She owns Stonehedge Fiber Mill in East Jordan, and she joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:09 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Mobile and Web app helps feed hungry children in Grand Rapids

Web designer, Adam Salois (left), and Managing Director, Jonathan Kumar (right).
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

Using the power of social media to do good – in this case, ordering a dessert or an appetizer and, in doing so, helping to feed a hungry child.

Our next guest has accomplished that with a mobile and Web app called FoodCircles currently up and running in Grand Rapids.

Jonathan Kumar is the managing director of FoodCircles and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:07 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

How can our voting system be improved?

The Secretary of State says 95.5% of eligible voters are registered
Lars Plougmann Creative Commons

During his recent State of the Union speech, President Obama made passing mention of our voting system.

"Citizenship means standing up for everyone’s right to vote. Last year, part of the Voting Rights Act was weakened.  But conservative Republicans and liberal Democrats are working together to strengthen it, and the bipartisan commission I appointed last year has offered reforms so that no one has to wait more than a half hour to vote.  Let’s support these efforts.  It should be the power of our vote, not the size of our bank account, that drives our democracy."

So, the voting system is on the president's mind. So, too, is it on the mind of Michigan Radio's political commentator Jack Lessenberry. He joined us today to discuss the problems he has noticed with our voting system.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:04 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Democrats split over the new farm bill

Rep. Dan Kildee (D-MI)
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

When President Obama visits Michigan tomorrow, he will sign into law the new, massive farm bill. After years of debate, both the House and Senate passed the almost $1 trillion measure.

And, as usual in Congress, the legislation saw a split between Michigan's delegation, but not just the same old Republican vs. Democratic split.

Out of Michigan's five Democratic U.S. Representatives, two voted against the bill, three in favor of it.  One of the Democrats who voted for the bill was Congressman Dan Kildee of Flint, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:59 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

How successful was the War on Poverty?

Poverty has doubled in Livingston County over the last five years
SamPac creative commons

It has now been 50 years since President Lyndon Johnson declared a War on Poverty.

There is a popular perception that President Johnson's War on Poverty failed. Critics point to the official poverty rate and say it has scarcely budged from 1964 to 2014, despite the $15 trillion spent in those 50 years.

But a University of Michigan economist is challenging that view. She is co-author of a new paper that analyzes spending during the Johnson Administration, and she believes it is wrong to call the War on Poverty a failure.

Martha Bailey joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:56 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

After years of debate, Congress has sent the almost $1 trillion farm bill to President Obama, and, as usual, opposition to the legislation was a left-right affair. On today's show: Congressman Dan Kildee of Flint joins us to talk about why he voted in favor.

Then, Michigan Radio’s political commentator Jack Lessenberry explained why fixing Michigan’s voting system may be harder than you think.

And, medical students are reaching out to provide health care to uninsured people. We spoke with one of these students about free student-run medical clinics.

And, a new mobile and Web app is providing food for hungry children in Grand Rapids.

Also, we spoke to an economist from the University of Michigan about the success of Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty.

And, the owner of Stonehedge Fiber Mill in East Jordan, Michigan, joined us today to tell us about how she was approached to provide yarn for the Ralph Lauren Olympic closing ceremonies sweaters. 

First on the show, it's Thursday, which means it's time for our weekly check-in with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes.

He's been going through Gov. Snyder's proposed budget for the new fiscal year and has decided the governor's got something going for him: what President George Herbert Walker Bush called "The Big Mo."

Daniel Howes joined us today to discuss the issue.

Stateside
4:52 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Daniel Howes on Snyder's new state budget

Governor Rick Snyder delivering his State of the State address Wednesday night.
gophouse.com

It's Thursday, which means it's time for our weekly check-in with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes.

He's been going through Gov. Snyder's proposed budget for the new fiscal year and has decided the governor's got something going for him: what President George Herbert Walker Bush called "The Big Mo."

Daniel Howes joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:29 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Looking at the long range economic outlook for Michigan

Kettering University junior Steve Needham at the Innovation Center.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

Today we looked at the long-range forecast for Michigan as a whole and what it will take in terms of policy decisions and education to keep Michigan from having a future as dark and dismal as a Dickens novel.

Two writers who've explored these questions for Bridge Magazine joined us today: Ron French and Nancy Derringer.

*Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:28 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Gov. Snyder reveals new state budget

Michigan State Capitol Building
User: mattileo/flickr

  Gov. Rick Snyder has delivered his budget proposal for fiscal year 2015.

The $52 billion budget calls for a small increase to maintain the state's roads and bridges, increases in education funding, and a plan to restore an income tax credit to some homeowners.

Rick Snyder has delivered his budget proposal for fiscal year 2015.

The $52 billion budget calls for a small increase to maintain the state's roads and bridges, increases in education funding, and a plan to restore an income tax credit to some homeowners.

We spoke with Chris Gautz, Capitol correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business and Jonathan Oosting, Capitol reporter for MLive.  

Stateside
5:25 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

What will the country's farm bill mean for Michigan?

President Barack Obama
(Official White House photo)

It’s official. The country will have a farm bill. On Friday, President Obama plans to sign the nearly $1 trillion bill into law on his trip in East Lansing. On today’s show we take a closer look at the farm bill and explore what all this means to Michigan farmers.

Listen to the audio above.

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