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Stateside
5:13 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Child abuse is on the rise in Michigan, economic conditions might be to blame

The types of child abuse from Childhelp-USA.
childhelp-usa.com

An interview with Jane Zehnder-Merrell and Cathy Weissenborn.

Child abuse is on the rise in Michigan.

That's not just opinion or speculation.

As recently as 2006, Michigan's rate of child abuse and neglect was below the national average.

Today, it is more than 50% higher than the national rate.

And this surge in child abuse comes exactly as state spending on abuse and neglect prevention has been cut sharply.

Why are child abuse and neglect rates so high in Michigan?

For the answer we turn to Jane Zehnder-Merrell, the project director for Kids Count in Michigan at the Michigan League for Public Policy, and Cathy Weissenborn, the President of CARE House of Oakland County, the Child Abuse and Neglect Council of Oakland Count.

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Stateside
3:14 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

It was built in Detroit for Civil War Union Army veterans, now some are working to save it

The Grand Army of the Republic Building.
historicdetroit.org

If you've ever driven on Grand River on Detroit's West Side, chances are you've spotted it. The building that looks like a small castle right there on the corner of Grand River and Cass with those crenelated turrets looking like something out of medieval England or France.

The building was a used as a meeting space for a fraternal organization formed for Civil War Union Army veterans - the Grand Army of the Republic. When its last living members were dwindling, the organization left the building.

Fans of the Grand Army of the Republic building will be heartened to hear that it has some champions: three men who are doing their best to save it from the sad list of Detroit's architectural gems that have been allowed to decay or have fallen to the wrecker's ball.

And these three do not have deep-pockets.

Dan Austin is a writer for the Detroit Free Press, and he also runs the Detroit architectural resource HistoricDetroit.org.

He joined us today to talk about the building.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:37 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Can Governor Snyder force the Legislature into a special session to pass Medicaid expansion?

Gov. Snyder Facebook

An interview with Rick Pluta and Zoe Clark.

The debate over expanding Medicaid in Michigan continues.

Governor Snyder is still pushing for the state Senate to vote on the legislation. It would expand Medicaid to hundreds of thousands of low-income adults in Michigan. The state House has already approved it.

Over the weekend, Mark Schauer waded into the debate. Schauer, a Democrat, is running for Governor in 2014.

He said on Saturday that he does not understand why Governor Snyder is not calling the Legislature into a special session.

Rick Pluta and Zoe Clark, Michigan Radio’s “It’s Just Politics” team, joined us today to answer Mark Schauer’s question.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:35 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

With changing climate, Michigan might experience more heat waves and other health concerns

Marlana Shipley Flickr

An interview with Ilene Wolff.

If you are not a fan of hot weather, this is not a week you're going to enjoy. Temperatures will be in the 90s and the high humidity means it's going to feel like it's over 100 all week long.

Weather and public health experts tell us we in Michigan had better get used to heat waves like this, because this is our future, and that is raising many health concerns.

The current issue of Hour Detroit has a story that looks at what those health concerns are: it's called "Warning on Warming” by Ilene Wolff.

She joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:26 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Former University of Michigan student speaks about overcoming her methamphetamine addiction

Jen Cervi is the founder of the Collegiate Recovery Program.
http://www.facesandvoicesofrecovery.org/

An interview with Jen Cervi, founder of the Collegiate Recovery Program.

Three of the five men linked to the biggest meth bust in Michigan have been sentenced to federal prison.

It began with a traffic stop in Paw Paw, which led police to discover more than 20 pounds of pure methamphetamine from the vehicle and from a pole barn in Van Buren County.

U.S. Homeland Security believes methamphetamine was being smuggled into the country in hidden compartments of vehicles and then sold in West Michigan.

And crime reports show that southwest Michigan counties top the state list for meth lab busts, while burns from explosions and spills from cooking meth are on the rise in Kalamazoo County, and meth cases crowd court dockets in southwest Michigan.

Jen Cervi founded the Collegiate Recovery Program while she was a student at the University of Michigan. Today she's a substance abuse coordinator at Michigan Ability Partners.

And Jen Cervi is a recovering meth addict. She has been sober since May 13, 2006.

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Stateside
5:21 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

New legislation calls for more regulations on 'fracking' in Michigan

A natural gas well.
World Resources Institute

An interview with Democratic state Representative Sarah Roberts.

Democrats in the state House are calling for more state regulations on hydraulic fracturing – or “fracking” in Michigan. Fracking releases oil and gas from deep underground by cracking open rock with a high-pressure mix of water, fine sand and chemicals pumped into wells.

The state has seen an influx of energy producers since companies started using this controversial process to extract natural gas.

Democratic state Representative Sarah Roberts is a co-sponsor of this package of eight bills. She represents the 18th District from St Clair Shores. She joined us today to talk about 'fracking.'

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:19 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

The Great Lakes need help to stay stocked with fish

Flickr

An interview with Gary Whelan of the State Department of Natural Resources.

Here's something to think about the next time you pick up a fishing pole and cast into one of the Great Lakes.

That fish you catch might have gotten there not courtesy of Mother Nature, but rather with some help from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

This year alone, the MDNR will stock about 19 million fish into the Great Lakes.

Gary Whelan is with the State Department of Natural Resources and he joined us today from Lansing.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:17 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Stateside for Monday, July 15th, 2013

Democrats in the state House have introduced a package of bills that would add more state regulations to the process of hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking.’ We spoke to a co-sponsor of the legislation on today's show.

And, as the use of meth makes headlines across the state, we talked to one woman about her recovery and what she's doing for other addicts.

And, it’s going to be a hot week for Michiganders. We took a look at what health concerns are related to the increased temperatures.

Also, we spoke with Gary Whelan of the State Department of Natural Resources about what is being done to keep the Great Lakes stocked with fish.

First on the show, the debate over expanding Medicaid in Michigan continues.

Governor Snyder is still pushing for the state Senate to vote on the legislation. It would expand Medicaid to hundreds of thousands of low-income adults in the state. The state House has already approved it.

Over the weekend, Mark Schauer waded into the debate.

Schauer – a Democrat – is running for Governor in 2014. He said on Saturday that he does not understand why Governor Snyder is not calling the Legislature into a special session.

Rick Pluta and Zoe Clark, Michigan Radio’s “It’s Just Politics” team, joined us today to answer Mark Shauer’s question.

Stateside
5:50 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Creditors are not buying Orr's 'deadbeat defense' for Detroit

Sarah Cwiek Michigan Radio

An interview with Daniel Howes.

It’s Thursday, which means it’s time for our weekly check-in with Daniel Howes, Columnist at the Detroit News.

Today he took a look at Kevyn Orr and the meetings he had this week with Detroit’s creditors and bond holders. As he wrote in his column:

As Orr’s week of meeting with creditors and pension funds unspools and Detroit slouches closer to a history chapter nine bankruptcy filing, the gulf separating the financial imperatives of the city’s creditors and political realities of its predicament is unmistakable and probably unbridgeable.

Daniel Howes joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:49 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Michigan is seeing a slowdown in home foreclosures

Michigan ranks 8th in the nation for foreclosures

An interview with Daren Bloomquist with Realty Trac.

Michigan's home foreclosure rate is tumbling.

During the Great Recession, Michigan's foreclosure rate was among the nation's highest and, at times, the highest in the nation.

Today, Michigan ranks 15th.

Put it another way: Our home foreclosure rate is half of what it was six months ago.

Daren Bloomquist is with Realty Trac and he joined us today from their offices in California.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:47 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

University of Michigan teacher climbs Mount Everest

Scott DeRue at the summit of Mount Everest.

An interview with Scott DeRue, a teacher at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.

When you think about the school classes that meant the most to you, chances are the ones that had the most impact were the ones that translated into real-world experience.

What could be more real-world than teaching lessons learned in climbing to the summit of Mount Everest?

Scott DeRue teaches at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, where he directs the Emerging Leaders Program and co-directs the Ross Leadership Initiative, so he is all about teaching leadership and team development.

His students will be getting lessons in leadership and teamwork learned the hard way: this past May, Scott DeRue climbed to the summit of Mount Everest.

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Stateside
5:44 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Michigan videographer heads to Greenland this summer to document global warming

Project "Dark Snow" will document the effects of soot and pollution on glaciers.
Christine Zenino Flickr

An interview with videographer Peter Sinclair.

A Midland, Michigan man is packing for quite a summer trip.

Peter Sinclair is a videographer. He and his camera will join a team of scientists and Rolling Stone writer Bill McKibbin for a trip to Greenland.

Why Greenland, you ask? Because they believe that's where global warming and the soot and pollutants we're pumping into the atmosphere are eating away at the glaciers. The team wants to do more research into this glacial melting and Peter Sinclair is going to record their efforts.

Peter Sinclair joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:42 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Michigan's home foreclosure rate is falling and our state is certainly no longer number one in foreclosures in the country. We found out why on today's show.

And, Michigan Radio's Political Analyst Jack Lessenberry joined us to take a look at how your state lawmakers are spending their summer recess.

And, a Michigan videographer is heading to Greenland to document the effects of pollution on glaciers for a project called “Dark Snow.”

Also, we spoke with the father of a 12-year-old Ohio State fan who found a creative way to use the rivalry between OSU and U of M to help him beat brain cancer.

And, Scott DeRue, who teaches at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, joined us to talk about his recent climb to the summit of Mount Everest.

First on the show, it’s Thursday which means it’s the time we turn to Daniel Howes – Columnist at the Detroit News.

Today he took a look at Kevyn Orr and the meetings he had this week with Detroit’s creditors and bond holders.

Stateside
5:15 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Summer vacation for Congress and state Legislature

The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, or "Super Committee," failed to come up with a compromise to reduce the deficit. Michigan members of the Super Committee spoke about the experience.
U.S. Congress congress.gov

An interview with Todd Spangler and Jack Lessenberry.

What are your summer vacation plans? For many in Michigan, it's time at the cottage or beach up North.

If you're a lawmaker, either state or federal, "summer vacation" has a different meaning. It gives you time to be in your district, take the pulse of voters, hear their concerns.

Covering the Washington angle is Todd Spangler, the D.C.-based reporter for the Detroit Free Press. And looking at Lansing is Jack Lessenberry, Michigan Public Radio's political analyst.

They joined us today to talk about summer vacation for members of Congress and state Legislature.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:12 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

12-year-old OSU fan named his brain tumor "Michigan" and beat it

Grant Reed is using the rivalry between OSU and U of M to help him beat his cancer.
Detroit Free Press

It's a safe bet to state that one of the greatest sports rivalries in America is the one between Michigan and Ohio State.

Well, there's a "Beat Michigan" campaign happening right now in Buckeye-land that even the most die-hard Wolverine fan could not complain about.

A 12-year-old Ohio State fan---a true Ohio State fan---has been fighting brain cancer for the past two years. And to get him through the grueling chemo to help him marshal every bit of energy towards beating that cancer, young Grant Reed has named his tumor "Michigan."

And guess what, it's working! And there's nothing like some Internet fame to take a kid's mind off of the tough realities of a cancer battle.

Grant's dad, Troy Reed, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
1:44 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Planned renovation of I-94 is met with resistance, but will it be worth it?

Renovation plans for I-94 include expanding and modernizing.
Flickr

An interview with Rob Morosi and Megan Owens.

Earlier this summer, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, SEMCOG, adopted something called the "2040 Regional Transportation Plan." It's a roadmap, essentially, of how to spend $36 billion over the next 30 years to improve transportation in Southeast Michigan.

Of all the proposed improvements in this plan, the most controversial has been the renovation and expansion of I-94 and I-75. The price tag to expand and renovate these Detroit-area freeways is around $4 billion.

But critics say the proposals, especially the I-94 project, would force neighbors to pay a different price.

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Stateside
5:16 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

The drive-in movie theater celebrates its 80th anniversary

The Ford-Wyoming drive-in movie theater in Detroit.
Jim Rees Flickr

An interview with Philip Hallman with the University of Michigan's Department of Screen Arts and Culture.

Ask any baby-boomer about some of their best memories growing up and chances are good that a drive-in theater figures in there somewhere.

It was a wonderful and uniquely American thing: roll up to the parking spot, perch the little speaker on your window, order lots of food, and watch movies from your car. Kids would go in their PJs and watch movies while lying on the roof. For teenagers in the 50s, 60s and 70s, well, perhaps the movie was a secondary attraction.

This summer marks the 80 year anniversary of the invention of the drive-in movie theater. After a slow start, the trend really took off. Detroit got its first drive-in theater in 1938.

Let's take a trip back in time to the glory days of the drive-in. Joining us is Philip Hallman with the University of Michigan's Department of Screen Arts and Culture.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:14 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

New book tells the story of 5 Michigan nurses and medics caught behind Nazi lines in WWII

Cate Lineberry, author of "The Secret Rescue: An Untold Story of American Nurses and Medics Behind Nazi Lines."
Facebook

An interview with author Cate Lineberry.

It's been nearly 70 years since the last bomb fell and the last bullet was fired in World War II, but stories from the war are still being unearthed.

One of these stories is told in the new book "The Secret Rescue: An Untold Story of American Nurses and Medics Behind Nazi Lines" by Cate Lineberry.

A plane carrying nurses and medics crash lands in Albania behind Nazi lines, and you would not believe what it took to get these Americans to safety.

It's the kind of story that would make a powerful movie. It has been largely hidden and unknown all these years, and figuring in this story are five nurses and medics from Michigan.

Author Cate Lineberry joined us today from New Orleans.

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Politics & Culture
5:07 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, July 10, 2013

During World War II, a plane crashed behind Nazi lines. Thirty nurses and medics, five of them from Michigan, survived. Their incredible story is finally being told.

And, we celebrated the 80th anniversary of the drive-in movie theater. Did you know Michigan once had more than 100 drive-ins? Today just a hand full are in operation. Also, Kevyn Orr canceled the bus tour he was supposed to take the Detroit's creditors on today. We spoke with Nancy Kaffer about why this happened. First on the show, this has certainly been a wet and muggy summer. Michigan farmers endured a hot and dry summer in 2012, so we wondered what the soggy summer of 2013 is doing to crops and to farmers. Is it better than the scorcher of 2012? 

Ken DeCock is a third-generation farmer in Macomb Township where his family owns Boyka's Farm Market. He joined us today to give us the farmer's-eye view of our weather.

Stateside
5:03 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Detroit's creditors will not be going on a bus tour of the city

No DDOT bus tour for creditors.

An interview with Nancy Kaffer, Columnist at the Detroit Free Press.

Detroit’s emergency manager has canceled a planned bus tour for city bondholders today.

The bus tour was meant to hammer home that Detroit is in dire shape and simply cannot afford to pay off all its debts.

The Wall Street creditors are in town to talk with Kevyn Orr. They’re trying to work out a deal outside bankruptcy court.

Nancy Kaffer, Columnist at the Detroit Free Press joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

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