Stateside Staff

A scene from Roger Corman's 1961 comedy horror "Creature from the Haunted Sea"
flickr user poppet with a camera / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

This year’s Traverse City Film Festival will include a very special moment.

Legendary producer, director, actor, and screenwriter Roger Corman will receive the Michigan Filmmaker Award.

Today on Stateside:

Since the Great Recession, Michigan has seen unemployment numbers drop to their lowest level in a decade. Auto sales and profits are booming, construction is up, and houses are selling again. But the 2015 Kids Count Data Book out today finds the rising tide of recovery has not lifted all boats, especially here in Michigan.

Flickr user 401(K) 2012 / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

With unemployment down, U.S. car and truck sales up, and consumer sentiment indices up, all the traditional signs point to an improving economy.

So why is it that many of us aren't feeling this prosperity?

Tom Walsh dug into this question for the Detroit Free Press.

Michigan has a 15% residential recycling rate, compared to 30% in neighboring states
flickr user Redwin Law / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

There’s a first-of-its-kind study happening in West Michigan that hopes to determine if we’re throwing away money each time we haul the trash to the curb.

Researchers are picking through landfills in Kent, Muskegon, and Ottawa counties, searching for recyclables that are getting tossed in the trash.

Shelly Sulser

What makes someone want to live on an island?

Loreen Niewenhuis pondered this question in her book, A 1,000 Mile Great Lakes Island Adventure, which recounts her journey traveling to many of the islands in each of the Great Lakes. This is the third in her Great Lakes Adventure series and the last time she spoke with us she had just completed hiking the shorelines of all five Great Lakes.

an island from above
Flickr user Steven Tomsic / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Official at the Department of Natural Resources are inviting the public to comment on a draft plan for managing Lake Michigan islands.

“We are looking at developing a collaborative effort where we involve island residents and local governments and tribal governments and other interested stake holders in helping us, in the future, set priorities and then more importantly execute priorities. We can't do this ourselves, for some of this work we are outlining,” said Keith Kintigh, a field operation manager for the DNR. 

MCity is open to researchers and is a key step toward getting autonomous vehicles ready for real roadways
Ford Motor Company

The University of Michigan has just opened a brand-new testing facility for autonomous vehicles, or “AVs.”

MCity will test the AV technology in a very realistic off-roadway environment, a key step before connected and automated vehicles and systems are deployed on actual roadways.

Autonomous vehicles are something of a rarity. Companies like Google are running some tests on real roads, but seeing one on the road is a little like spotting a hummingbird in your yard: a brief, fascinating sight, sparking curiosity as you watch it disappear into the world.

Wikimedia Commons / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

This week marks the 94th anniversary of the birth of one of the most determined and important women in medical science: Rosalyn Yalow.

While many people may not know her by name, countless patients have benefited from her research.

"She's one of the unsung heroes of modern radiation medicine," says University of Michigan medical historian Dr. Howard Markel.

Today on Stateside:

The Kalamazoo Promise is working, so why is it only in Kalamazoo? Jeff Degraff looks at what good the Promise has done, and tells about how much further it could be taken.

The University of Michigan has just opened a brand new testing facility for autonomous vehicles. Kevin DeSouza sits down to talk to us about the future and impact of self-driving vehicles.

Sen. Gary Peters and Cynthia Canty in the Stateside stdio
Amber Moon

Sen. Gary Peters, D-MI, has often reached out through the phone line to talk with us here on Stateside, but today he joined us in-studio to discuss petroleum coke, the Iran nuclear deal, the Export-Import Bank of the United States, and life as the only Democratic freshman in the U.S. Senate.

Flickr user farlane / http://michrad.io/1lxrdjm

Could low-alcohol wines that still pack full, rich flavor be on the horizon for Michigan?

HOUR Detroit Magazine's chief wine and restaurant critic Chris Cook says Michigan's flavor patterns do better with less alcohol, but balancing the two can be difficult.

Today on Stateside:

Eastern Michigan University and Oakland University have raised tuition above the state’s dictated cap. The Detroit Free Press’s David Jesse tells us about the decision and how it will affect the schools and their students.

The Hubble Space Telescope has allowed scientists to peer deep into space since 1990, expanding our understanding of the universe. But there’s still so much we don’t know. Brian O’Shea joins us to talk about finding out how big our universe really is.

Eastern Michigan University isn't the only school in Michigan bucking funding incentives
flickr user krossbow / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


The battle between Michigan’s public universities and state lawmakers over funding has ramped up in recent weeks.

Both Eastern Michigan University and Oakland University have busted state-imposed tuition caps, deciding that the state’s “reward” for not raising tuition just wasn’t worth it.

The universities raised their tuition for the upcoming school year by 7.8% and 8.48% respectively.

Darius Simpson and Scout Bostley perform "Lost Voices" at the 2015 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational
screenshot


Darius Simpson and Scout Bostley’s performance poem “Lost Voices” took third place at the 2015 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational.

Speaking in each other’s voices, the two Eastern Michigan University students tear into reproductive rights, racism, white privilege, and more.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Hubble Space Telescope has allowed scientists to peer into deep space, expanding our understanding of the universe. But there are still many gaps in that knowledge, including knowing how many galaxies are really out there.

Brian O'Shea is an associate professor of physics and astronomy at Michigan State and part of a team that has been working on that question.

The team has been using the Hubble Space Telescope to view galaxies that are billions of light years away.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Why is it that the poorest people in Michigan, the ones who face the biggest struggle to find jobs and get to those jobs, are paying the highest auto insurance rates in the country?

Today on Stateside:

Congress will have 60 days to look over the proposed Iran deal
White House

It took years of negotiation and diplomacy to bring about today's historic deal between Iran and world powers. Iran has agreed to curb its nuclear program in exchange for the easing of economic sanctions.

Now, the White House has to sell this deal to Congress and it could wind up being one of the biggest political fights of the Obama presidency. Congress has 60 days to dissect the terms of the agreement.

Barclay Oudersluys / Facebook

It's a key scene in one of the most beloved American films –the moment when Forrest Gump starts running.

Barclay Oudersluys, 23, of Birmingham, has decided to do for real what Tom Hanks pretended to do on film. He is running across America.

It’s called Project Gump and Oudersluys is doing it to raise $10,000 for the Hall Steps Foundation. He hopes the money will go to help build a well in Mozambique. 

In May, his journey began at the Santa Monica Pier in California and he’s headed to Marshall Point Lighthouse in Maine. That’s 14 states and almost 3,200 miles. 

Jeffrey Sauger / General Motors


The United Automobile Workers and Fiat-Chrysler open contract talks today. General Motors talks started Monday, and Ford begins late next week.

According to Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes, these talks are new territory for the Detroit Three and the UAW.

Courtesy of the author

The power of friendship. It cuts through time and distance. The kind of friendship where, even if you haven't seen each other for a long stretch of time, you pick right up as if no time had passed. The kind of friendship that rides through life's ups and downs.

Today on Stateside:

Enough was, apparently, enough. The State of Michigan today terminated its contract with Aramark to feed prison inmates. Chad Livengood sits down to talk with us about the decision.

The ceremonial handshakes have been exchanged, they’ve posed for photographers, and, with that, contract talks between the United Auto Workers Union and General Motors officially began today. Greg Gardner is covering the talks for the Detroit Free Press, and he tells us about day one.

Two Iraq War vets are now serving in the State Legislature
flickr user cedarbenddrive / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

There are two Iraq war veterans now serving in the state Legislature.

Sen. David Knezek, D-Dearborn Heights, and Rep. Tom Barrett, R-Potterville, both took their seats in November 2014, and they’re working hard toward a goal of improving veterans’ affairs here in Michigan.

Aramark uniforms delivery truck, Westland Michigan
Dwight Burdette / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


After 19 months of maggoty food, traces of rodents, workers engaging in sex acts with inmates, and much more, the state of Michigan today has terminated its contract with Aramark to feed prison inmates.

The Detroit News’ Chad Livengood tells us that each side has said this decision was the result of a mutual agreement.

Flickr user Don Harrison / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

One of the most profound changes in Michigan has been the way we care for and treat people who are developmentally disabled.

In 1970, there were 14,000 people living in 13 institutions in Michigan. Today, there are no institutions in the state with the last one being closed in 2009.

This section of the Mitchell Map, circa 1755, shows the area that is now Michigan
flickr user FotoGuy / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Just what is the Lost Peninsula?

Don Faber tells us it’s a little strip of land in the very southeast corner of Michigan.

And here’s the kicker: The only way to access it is through Toledo.

Faber tells us that when Michigan and Ohio were still young states, they each performed a geographical survey to determine their boundaries.

Ohio’s survey placed Toledo in Ohio. Michigan’s placed it, well, in Michigan.

What followed was the Toledo War, a short conflict that ended in military stalemate.

 

Today on Stateside:

The Greek financial crisis could have implications for the world economy
user Duncal Hall / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

We’ve seen the images of people lined up at ATMs, hoping to withdraw a few euros.

Crowds sang and celebrated after voting against the terms of a bailout by international creditors.

The Greek financial meltdown has grabbed the attention of the world, and a pullout from the European Union could destabilize the world's financial markets.

House Bill 4183 wants to move public notices from the pages of your newspaper to the pages of your web browser
user Jon S / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Is it time to take public notices digital?

Those pages in our newspaper, with the government notices of election dates, upcoming public hearings, and legal descriptions of property to be sold or redeveloped are the focus of House Bill 4183.

It's a bill that could cost newspapers a long-time source of revenue, and it could shut out people who don't have Internet access.

Flickr user Liza Lagman Sperl / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Motor City Blight Busters are developing Veteran's Village Center, which provides housing for veterans and the opportunity to work with their organization.

The Center is currently under renovation. It’s located in Northwest Detroit near other properties owned by Blight Busters. 

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