Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside:

First Lady Edith Wilson acted as de facto President of the United States for over a year after her husband's stroke
Library of Congress /

One of the big questions of the 2016 presidential race is whether we’ll finally see a woman in the White House.

But there’s a little-known secret that’s finally coming to light: It wouldn’t be the first time a woman has run the country.

From late 1919 until March 1921, first lady Edith Galt Wilson was the de facto president of the United States.


Today on Stateside:

Frank Kelley
Detroit Free Press

Frank Kelley is a man of the people and a true public servant.

He became both the youngest and oldest Attorney General in Michigan's history, serving for 37 years. He worked with seven presidents and five Michigan governors, acted to touch the lives of everyone in our state, and bowed out gracefully without a whiff of scandal or disrepute in all that time in office.

His story is told in the new book The People’s Lawyer: The Life and Times of Frank J. Kelley, the Nation’s Longest-Serving Attorney General.

Drinking on Game Day at MSU
Simon Schuster / Bridge Magazine

It's a rite of passage on college campuses: Game Day.

Yes, thousands pour onto campus for a football game, but there’s also the pre-game and post-game celebrations.

The centerpiece of both: alcohol – lots and lots of alcohol.

Bridge Magazine explored on-campus drinking in a series of reports centering on Saturday, Sept. 12.

Detroit has collapsed into ruin, and a man named Kelly is earning a living as a scrapper.

He picks through the thousands of abandoned buildings, stealing scrap metal and then selling it to salvage yards in Scrapper, the newest novel from Michigan author Matt Bell.

The New York Times describes Scrapper as, “equal parts dystopian novel, psychological thriller and literary fiction.”

Bell says he likes that description, but thinks of the novel also as a detective story.

Maria Elena/flickr /

A dusty old Facebook hoax that was debunked years ago has flared up again being passed from friend to friend like a bad cold.

It's the "Facebook privacy status" hoax – the one that reads "As of September 29, 2015, I do not give Facebook or any entities associated with Facebook permission to use my pictures, information, or posts, both past and future" ... and so on and so forth.

Cliff Lampe, associate professor at the University of Michigan School of Information joined us to talk about why so many people are falling for this again.

Today on Stateside:

Richard Masoner/Cyclelicious/flickr /

A small but growing number of Michiganders are turning to their bicycles as a means to get from Point A to Point B.

We've seen communities put in bike lanes to accommodate bicyclists, but that doesn't necessarily solve the tensions between cars and bikes sharing the road.

 Today on Stateside:

flickr user Bart /

Last year, Flint ended five decades of service from the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department. The city’s going to take its water from a new pipeline from Lake Huron, but that won’t be ready until some time next year.

In the meantime, Flint decided that rather than continuing to pay for Detroit water, it would get its drinking water from the Flint River.

Don...The UpNorth Memories Guy... Harrison / Creative Commons

The state of Michigan spends $30 million a year on its Pure Michigan campaign.

Those powerful ads have attracted millions of visitors from other states and other countries.

But, what happens when those visitors start driving around and want a great spot to stop and enjoy the beautiful scenery? Instead of, say, Lake Michigan, they'll behold some scrubby weeds and overgrown trees.

What's up with Michigan's scenic turnouts and roadside parks?  

The Tricycle Collective is working to help keep families in their homes through the tax foreclosure crisis in Detroit.
Michele Oberholtzer

Wayne County is currently in the midst of the largest municipal property auction in United States history.

Some 30,000 properties are on the auction block, and around 85% of the properties facing foreclosure are in Detroit.

Michele Oberholtzer watched the 2014 Wayne County Tax Foreclosure and saw that many of those properties sold to investors and speculators were occupied homes.

João André O. Dias/flickr /

You go to a fancy restaurant and order a bottle of red wine. The tuxedoed waiter calls over the sommelier who takes the order, brings the bottle, opens and pours it.

Then, you notice there’s a lot more fuss being made at a nearby table. With great ceremony, the sommelier is decanting the wine, and pouring the entire bottle into a glass carafe on the side table.

So, you think, what’s the matter with my wine? Chopped liver?

Today on Stateside:

  • Volkswagen cheated and lied to its customers by tricking the EPA. Heads are already rolling, but Daniel Howes says this isn’t even the end of the beginning.
  • Migrant, immigrant and seasonal workers have been the backbone of West Michigan’s agriculture industry for decades, and now efforts are being made to collect and celebrate the Hispanic community’s oral histories.
flickr user Texas Military Forces /

The city of Holland in West Michigan has certainly made its Dutch heritage known. If the name alone isn’t enough for you, the city has held an annual Tulip Time Festival, celebrating all things Dutch for the last 86 years.

But there’s a sizeable Hispanic community in Holland. The latest census numbers indicate Hispanics make up 23% of the city’s population.

There’s no other way to look at it: Volkswagen cheated and lied to its customers.

The German automaker admitted to cheating on the US emissions tests for half a million of its diesel vehicles.

CEO Martin Winterkorn has stepped down and more heads are expected to roll by week’s end, but Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes says this isn’t even the end of the beginning.

Michigan Legislature
Michigan Municipal League

If you want to have sex with someone, it can't be presumed your potential partner shares your desire just because you're dating.

It can't be presumed based on someone's drunken actions.

It can't be presumed because that someone didn't say no.


Today on Stateside:

Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

Our state used to boast a pretty strong education system, but just about any measurement given these days suggests that’s no longer true.

Case in point: the National Assessment of Educational Progress, the nation’s report card, finds Michigan is in the bottom third of all states in fourth grade reading, fourth grade math and eighth grade math.

Robert James Russell / Twitter

Ann Arbor author Robert James Russell is celebrating the release of his newest book, Mesilla, this week.

Mesilla is a Western that follows Everett Root, a wounded Civil War deserter haunted by his past, into 1863 New Mexico Territory.

Schwallier's Country Basket /

Honeycrisp harvest is underway in Michigan.

The many fans of Honeycrisp apples will be happy to learn that all signs point to a fine crop this year.

But that good news presents new challenges for Michigan growers.

John U. Bacon

John U. Bacon joins us again for this week’s sports roundup.

Tigers lose to Royals

According to Bacon, the Tigers' story hasn’t changed.

“There’s nothing to see here, people,” he says, explaining that the team showed their hand at the end of the trade deadline some weeks ago.

This week marks the 45th anniversary of Dr. Alice Hamilton’s death.

Hamilton was a leading expert in the field of occupational health and a pioneer in toxicology. She lived to the age of 101.

Claressa Shields is the first American woman to win an Olympic gold medal in boxing

One of the breakout stars of the 2012 summer Olympics in London was a teenage girl from Flint.

Claressa Shields made it to London to become the first American woman to win Olympic gold in boxing.

Shields, nicknamed “T-Rex,” is still going strong. She won the World Championship in 2014, and she recently won gold at the Pan American games in Toronto.

flickr user Kenny Louie /

The first day of autumn is less than a week away, but if you’re planning to take a trip up north to marvel at the fall colors, MLive and meteorologist Mark Torregrossa tells us you might want to wait.

He says rain and warm weather are keeping the trees lush and green.

Fiat Chryler CEO Sergio Marchionne, left, and UAW President Dennis Williams.

A tentative contract agreement has been reached by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and United Auto Workers, one that FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne describes as “transformational.”

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes says this proposed deal sets a high bar.

Rep. Dan Kildee is part of a bipartisan group that is pushing to extend the Export-Import Bank's charter
Steve Carmody

“If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.”

Republicans opposed to the Iran nuclear deal are taking that old adage to heart.

Twice now Senate Republicans have tried to pass a resolution rejecting the deal, and twice they’ve failed, blocked by Senate Democrats who support President Obama’s key foreign policy initiative.

Led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, they’ll try again today.

Donald Trump speaks at the 2015 CPAC in Maryland
flickr user Gage Skidmore /


The second Republican presidential debate happens tonight at the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California.

Former Texas Governor Rick Perry recently dropped out of the race, which still leaves 16 candidates being squeezed into a two-tier debate.

Who’s up for a cricket burger? Maybe a cricket muffin?

That might be a tough sell for the average Michigan consumer, but Anthony Hatinger and Theodore Kozerski are giving it a try.

They’re co-founders of Detroit Ento, Detroit’s first sustainable protein research and development firm. And they’re preaching the gospel of crickets for food, feed and pharmaceuticals.