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4:07 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

Listen to a poem in celebration of opening day for the Tigers

A statue of Ernie Harwell in Comerica Park.
Kevin Ward Flickr

On opening day, the late Ernie Harwell - the voice of the Tigers for 42 years - would recite the poem Song of the Turtle. It signaled spring and a renewed life and opportunities. For Tiger fans, it just wasn't opening day without hearing Ernie Harwell speak those words of that poem.

In memory of the late sportscaster, here's Michigan writer Terry Wooten reading his poem Old Ernie Harwell:

Read more
Stateside
4:38 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Daniel Howes on "old" GM, "new" GM, and Mary Barra

Next week will bring a big test for new GM CEO Mary Barra.

She will present herself to Congress for a two-day grilling over the ever-growing ignition switch crisis, a problem that GM says is linked to 12 deaths.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes thinks Barra has a whole lot of heavy lifting to do to get this "new" GM out of the shadow of the missteps of the "old" GM. He joined us today for our weekly check-in.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:38 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, March 27, 2014

When you think "Michigan," you think tourism, right? Or, for some, maybe it's Tim Allen telling you about the state's open roads, fall colors, glistening lakes. Tourism means big business for the mitten. We look at how the changing climate might impact what more than 4.4 million out-of-state visitors will be able to do and enjoy when they come to the Great Lakes State. 

 Then, we spoke with Michigan author Laura Kasischke about her latest novel, Mind of Winter. And Daniel Howes joined us for our weekly check-in, to discuss Mary Barra and the ghost of GM's past. Also, women are underrepresented in the  STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields, but there is one University of Michigan student group trying to change that. And, we are one week into spring but still getting snow. Meterologist Jim Maczko spoke with us about when we can expect warmer weather.  First on the show, we are closing in on the deadline to purchase health insurance or face a penalty under the Affordable Care Act. 

Erin Knott is the Michigan Director of Enroll America, a non-profit, non-partisan group trying to get people enrolled in health insurance.

Erin joined us today to discuss the upcoming deadline. 

Stateside
4:37 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

It's been spring for a week, but the weather says otherwise

It's officially spring but we're still getting snow.
LisaW123 Flickr

So here we are, a week in to spring.  And what did we get this week as a present from Mother Nature?

That's right: snow. And cold.

National Weather Service meteorologist Jim Maczko, who is based in Grand Rapids, joined us today to discuss when the weather will finally warm up.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:31 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

University of Michigan student-led group encourages young girls to pursue math and science

FEMMES volunteers.
umich.edu/~femmesum/

We recently had a discussion on Stateside that explored the question: Why are there not more women in the STEM and Computer Science programs?

After that program, we got an eye-catching email from University of Michigan student Carrie Johnson. She's in the Chemical Biology Ph.D. program, and she is a part of a student-led group called FEMMES, which stands for Females Excelling More in Math, Engineering and Science.

When we heard how these students are reaching out to encourage and inspire other women, including holding free Saturday and after-school programs for girls in 4th through 6th grade, we knew we wanted to share their story with you.

Carrie Johnson and Abigail Garrity, a Ph.D. candidate in the Neuroscience Program at Michigan and co-president of FEMMES, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:31 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Michigan author Laura Kasischke discusses her latest novel

Michigan writer Laura Kasischke.
Wikipedia

You wake up on Christmas morning a bit hung over from too much spiked eggnog the night before. You woke up much later than you'd meant to and you try to shake off a lingering nightmare. You've got a houseful of guests to cook for, a moody teenage daughter sulking in her bedroom and there is a snowstorm to end all snowstorms howling outside.

Welcome to the world of Holly Judge. She's a wife, a mother, and a frustrated poet. And she's one of the central characters in the latest novel from Michigan author Laura Kasischke.  It's a psychological thriller called Mind of Winter.

Laura Kasischke joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:19 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

How will climate change affect Michigan tourism?

A "Pure Michigan" advertisement.
Pure Michigan YouTube

When you think "Michigan," you have to think tourism. It's big business for the Mitten.

The now-famous "Pure Michigan" commercials are airing on network TV for the first time.

Pure Michigan advertising attracted more than four million out-of-state visitors last year. But how will our warming climate impact what those visitors might be able to do and enjoy when they come to Michigan?

Sarah Nicholls is an associate professor of tourism at Michigan State University, and Jim MacInnes is President and CEO of Crystal Mountain in Thompsonville. They joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:18 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

The deadline to buy insurance draws closer

It's time to purchase insurance or face a fine.
user striatic Flickr

We are closing in on the deadline to purchase health insurance or face a penalty under the Affordable Care Act. Erin Knott is the Michigan Director of Enroll America, a non-profit, non-partisan group trying to get people enrolled in health insurance.

Erin joined us today to discuss the upcoming deadline. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
5:04 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Gay couples in Michigan go from elation to a state of limbo

Rick Pluta

That's the status of same-sex couples in Michigan who had hoped to marry after last Friday's ruling from federal judge Bernard Friedman, a ruling that struck down Michigan's constitutional ban on same-sex marriage.

More than 300 couples rushed to speak their vows on Saturday before the Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued a stay of Judge Friedman's ruling until appeals proceedings conclude.

And now we have heard from Gov. Rick Snyder about those couples. He said the state will not recognize those marriages.

MLive writer Jonathon Oosting joined us today.

Politics & Culture
4:58 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, March 26, 2014

The number of adults who smoke cigarettes is the lowest it's been in decades: 19% in 2010, compared to more than double that in 1965.

But now there are e-cigarettes, and it seems the use of these battery-powered nicotine inhalers is growing faster than science can keep up.

We explore the health risks of so-called "vaping" and what the state is doing to keep e-cigs out of the hands of children.

But first on today’s show, from elation to a state of limbo.

That's the status of same-sex couples in Michigan who had hoped to marry following last Friday's ruling from federal judge Bernard Friedman, a ruling that struck down Michigan's constitutional ban on same-sex marriage.

More than 300 couples rushed to speak their vows on Saturday before the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued a stay of Judge Friedman's ruling until appeals proceedings conclude.

And now we have heard from Governor Rick Snyder about those couples. He said the state will not recognize those marriages.

MLive writer Jonathon Oosting joined us today.

Offbeat
4:49 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Marquette's walkability is a model for Michigan

Marquette, Michigan
mainfr4me Flickr

How do you guide your city or town into the future, without losing those elements from the past that make it special, livable, with a true sense of place?

That's a challenge many towns in Michigan face. Many small towns have lost their unique look, buried by a profusion of generic shopping strips, lots of gas stations, drug stores and fast food restaurants. And then there are the wide freeways and highways that carve a city up.

The city of Marquette is an example of how a city can redefine itself, yet make itself something special, livable and walkable. And what they're doing in Marquette can be a model for towns and cities all over Michigan. 

We are joined today by Dennis Stachewicz, the director of planning and community development for Marquette. 

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:45 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

How Michigan is trying to keep e-cigarettes out of minors' hands

An e-cig.
Lindsay Fox Flickr

You may have seen someone firing one up in a restaurant – where you thought smoking was banned. Maybe a friend or relative uses them. Or maybe you have tried to kick a cigarette habit by using one: an electronic cigarette.

These are the battery-powered inhalers that are loaded with a replaceable or refillable cartridge of liquid “juice” that can contain nicotine, solvents and flavors.  Puffing on an e-cig is called “vaping.” And there’s little doubt vaping is here to stay.

Sales of e-cigs have grown from around $500 million in 2012 to around $1.5 billion last year. 

Right now, there’s no regulation on e-cigs, beyond the FDA telling e-cig makers they may not market their products as a way to quit smoking.  And there’s nothing to keep the e-cigs from being sold to minors.

That has ignited debate in Lansing.

Associated Press reporter Emma Fidel has been looking into the state’s efforts to keep e-cigs out of the hands of kids under age 18.

Listen to the full interview above.

Made In Michigan
2:34 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

How a Michigan company unintentionally invented the cubicle

Love it or leave it, the cubicle has its roots in Michigan.
Mark Sebastian Flickr

An interview with Mark Schurman of Herman Miller.

The American office used to be rows of desks in a huge room with zero privacy.

All that changed when a Michigan-based company unintentionally invented the cubicle.

What led to the redesign of American offices?

We talk to Mark Schurman , of Herman Miller, to talk about how Michigan shaped the way offices across America look today.

Listen to full interview above.

Stateside
2:32 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

How a resistance fighter in Czechoslovakia became one of Michigan's most prominent engineers

Charles Novacek as a child.
"Border Crossings: Coming of Age in the Czech Resistance"

An interview with Sandra Novacek.

The next time you're in downtown Detroit, and you walk by the Cobo Center or the People Mover, or in Ypsilanti and you see Washtenaw Community College, or Providence Hospital in Southfield or many other buildings around Southeast Michigan — stop for a moment and remember this name: Charles Novacek.

He was born in what was then Czechoslovakia, and grew up through his country's occupation by the Nazis and then the Communists. He began training as a resistance fighter as a boy of 11, and continued the fight as he grew up. He endured prison and torture before escaping to a refugee camp and, ultimately, to a new life in Michigan.

Charles Novacek became a noted engineer in Michigan, working on many projects in the state that still stand today. And before he died in 2007, he wrote a memoir entitled "Border Crossings: Coming of Age in the Czech Resistance".

The book has now been published by Charles Novacek's wife, Sandra. We talk with Sandra about her husband's journey. 

For more information on the book, visit www.charlesnovacekbooks.com.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
2:29 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

An update on Lake Michigan oil spill

The cleanup on Lake Michigan.
Screenshot from The Chicago Tribune The Chicago Tribune

An interview with Michael Hawthorne, a reporter with The Chicago Tribune.

An oil spill from a BP refinery in Whiting, Ind., this week has raised new worries about the stepped-up processing of Canadian tar sands – and threats to Lake Michigan.

Considering that seven million people in Chicagoland depend on Lake Michigan for drinking water, even a little spill might be cause for concern.

Exactly what was spilled? How far did it spread? And has BP contained the leak?

We're joined now by Michael Hawthorne, a reporter with The Chicago Tribune.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:23 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Stateside for Tuesday, March 25, 2014

A Balanced Budget Amendment making the federal government not spend more than it takes in: It sounds pretty good. Get rid of those trillions and trillions of dollars of national debt. But one economist says that's not necessarily a great plan.

Then, it feels like we hear about recalls everyday, from food, to cars, to toys. They make news, but are consumers facing so-called recall fatigue? Are there just so many recalls that we've started to tune them out?

And, you don't have to hunt too far to find critics of our schools, of the way our children are learning, what they're learning and the achievement gap within our classrooms. But are we placing too much pressure on teachers when we expect them to fix these problems?

Also, it’s official. Merriam-Webster now recognizes “Yooper” as a word.

First on the show, for years there’s been talk that Michigan needs to put more money into its roads.

Gov. Snyder has said he wants at least $1.2 billion annually for road maintenance and repair.

A new report says the state needs closer to $2 billion a year.

But negotiations at the state Capitol stalled – until the last few weeks.

Earlier this month, some $200 million was OK’d in a supplemental budget. It looks like another deal could be in the works.

Now word on the street is that this is not some grand bargain. Instead, there are reports that the amount would be closer to $300-400 million. It’s a start, but why now?

Jack Lessenberry is Michigan Radio’s political analyst, and he joined us today.

Stateside
3:45 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

How much will it cost to fix the state of our roads?

What will it take to fix these roads?
Peter Ito flickr

An interview with Jack Lessenberry.

For years there’s been talk that Michigan needs to put more money into its roads.

Gov. Snyder has said he wants at least $1.2 billion annually for road maintenance and repair.

A new report says the state needs closer to $2 billion a year.

But negotiations at the state Capitol stalled – until the last few weeks.

Earlier this month, some $200 million was OK’d in a supplemental budget. It looks like another deal could be in the works.

Now word on the street is that this is not some grand bargain. Instead, there are reports that the amount would be closer to $300-400 million. It’s a start, but why now?

Jack Lessenberry is Michigan Radio’s political analyst, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:45 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Should teachers be held accountable for the achievement gap?

Sarah Hulett Michigan Radio

An interview with Natalie Davis, Alistair Bomphray, and Martha Curren-Preis, three teachers earning their PhDs in education.

You don't have to hunt too far to find critics of our schools, of the way our children are learning, what they're learning and the achievement gap within our classrooms.

There are countless ways, countless statistics that try to measure the problems. Here's just one, centered on the achievement gap. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, on 2007 standardized math exams, white fourth-graders performed better than black fourth-graders in all 46 states where results are available.

And we hear a steady drumbeat of criticism that students here in the U.S. are lagging behind their peers in other countries. When you look at standardized tests, American students rank 17th in reading, 23rd in science and 31st in math, which puts them behind students in Poland and Slovenia.

How much pressure should we put on individual teachers to fix these problems?

Natalie Davis, Alistair Bomphray, and Martha Curren-Preis are teachers who are all earning their Ph.D.s in education at the University of Michigan. They joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:45 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

'Yooper' recognized as an official word by Merriam-Webster's Dictionary

Flickr user herzogbr Flickr

An interview with English professor Anne Curzan.

Welcome, dear "Yooper." And we’re not talking specifically to those of you who live in the Upper Peninsula. We’re talking about the actual word "Yooper." It’s official, according to the 2014 edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary.

Anne Curzan is an English professor at the University of Michigan, and she joins us every Sunday on Michigan Radio for "That's What They Say."  Anne joined us today to discuss the specifics of this new official word. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:45 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Will a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution cure our national debt?

An interview with Charles Ballard, an economist with Michigan State University

Michigan could soon join about 20 states that are formally calling for a national convention to draft a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Michigan itself has a balanced budget requirement, but not so for the federal government.

This idea of a balanced budget amendment has really taken off in the past few years as the nation’s debt has increased.

Charles Ballad is an economist with Michigan State University, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

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