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Stateside
5:47 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Detroit's EM hints at how he might use DIA art to help city

Flickr

Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr has sent out the strongest hint yet that prized pieces in the DIA collection are on the table as a way to put money into the city coffers.

Without offering many details, Orr told the Detroit Economic Club today that there are ways for the DIA to make money from its artwork that might not involve outright sales, but perhaps would involve long-term leases.

Orr was clear -- he said he must consider ways to use the museum's treasures to help the bankrupt city.

And, earlier this week, another one of the city's "jewels" was back in the spotlight.

The State and Mayor Dave Bing announced an agreement under which the State DNR would run Belle Isle as Michigan's 102nd State Park.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes joined us to talk about all this.

Listen to the interview above.

Stateside
5:43 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Warming climate leading to heavier rains in region

Rain is in the forecast for much of Michigan.
Tom Grundy Flickr

This past summer brought us challenging days in terms of heavy rain, thunderstorms, and sewers unable to handle the fast and furious downpours.

And that is giving scientists cause for concern.

Dr Larissa Larsen is an associate professor in the Urban and Regional Planning Program at the University of Michigan and she joined us in the studio.

Listen to the audio above.

Politics & Culture
5:29 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, October 3rd, 2013

What if you could build a school from the ground-up? What would it look like? How would it feel? Just what would it be?

On today's show, we talk to a man who's re-imagining what early childhood could look like in Michigan.

And then, the state has signed a deal to lease Belle Isle from Detroit. The island soon becoming Michigan's 102nd state park, but there is plenty of unhappiness in Detroit about the decision. We'll find out why later in the hour.

But first, it's Day Three of the government shutdown. There was an Obama-Biden-Boehner-Pelosi-Reid-McConnell meeting at the White House late Tuesday that yielded nothing that we know of in terms of solving the impasse.

Meantime, Americans continue to express their anger at all sides involved in this stalemate.

We wanted to get some historical perspective and context to all of this. Has America weathered standoffs like this in the past? What can history teach us about the divisions we see now between the President, the House and Senate, Democrats and Republicans -- especially the far-right Republicans.

Is finding common ground possible in Washington in 2013?

For that, he turned to our favorite political-historian -- Gleaves Whitney directs the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University.

Stateside
1:46 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

How much solar energy does it take to cross Australia?

U-M's solar car.
umich.edu umich.edu

Cars running on solar energy might not be in every driveway in the country, but a group of students at the University of Michigan are helping keep the solar power dream alive.

The university’s solar car team, one of the most decorated teams of its kind in North America, is in Australia now, preparing to compete in the World Solar Challenge on Sunday. They’ll be shooting for the fastest time on an 1800-mile race from the top of the continent to the bottom. Teams from across the globe will be using nothing but the sun and a jet-like roadster to get them across the outback.

Read more
Stateside
5:34 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

The government shutdown from the perspective of a former Congressman

Joe Schwarz
Wikipedia

It's day two of the government shutdown.

Joe Schwarz is a former Republican Congressman from southern mid-Michigan. He has been out of office now for about 7 years. He joined us today to give us his perspective on the issue from the outside.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:34 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Congressman Gary Peters on the government shutdown

Gary Peters

It’s day two of the government shutdown.

Democratic Congressman Gary Peters joined us today. He represents Michigan's 14th Congressional district. He’s here to help those of us who are not on the ground in D.C. understand where things stand right now.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:31 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

What can be done about Michigan's overcrowded jails?

California inmates will be housed in a Baldwin prison beginning in 2011
Flickr user Still Burning Creative Commons

When the public hears that a prisoner has been sentenced to serve time in jail, most of us allow ourselves to think that the guilty party will do the time.

But what happens when the number of prisoners who are sentenced outstrips the capacity of that jail? Do you cram in more and more inmates? Relieve overcrowding through early release? Reduce bonds? And what are the repercussions of each of those approaches?

Daniel Manville is an Associate Clinical Professor of Law and the Director of the Civil Rights Clinic at Michigan State University. He joined us today to discuss the issue.

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Stateside
5:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Scrap metal theft is a huge problem for some cities in Michigan

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Imagine this: you go to open the doors of your church one bright morning and realize something is missing, something big. The statue of the crucified Christ has been stripped right off the outside wall.

Or you're driving along a street and you have to navigate your way around big open holes in the street because the manhole covers have been stolen.

Or how about this: the catalytic converter is stripped right out from under the hood of your parked car.

Welcome to the world of scrap-metal theft in Michigan cities.

Nancy Derringer reported on the problem for Bridge Magazine and she joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:20 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

Some thirty years after the County Jail Overcrowding Act was passed, Michigan is still dealing with overcrowding emergencies in jails across the state. On today's show: How do we fix the problem of jails filled to the brim? Do we reduce bonds? Increase rates of early release?

And, when it comes to scrap metal theft, anything goes, from manhole covers to copper Jesus statues. What can Michigan lawmakers do to crack down on these thefts?

Also, Michigan writer Natalie Burg joined us to talk about her new book. It's a memoir of her experience living on a Swedish farm.

First on the show, it’s day two of the government shutdown.

Democratic Congressman Gary Peters joined us today. He represents Michigan's 14th Congressional district. 

And former Congressman Joe Schwarz joined us to give us his perspective on the issue as well.

Politics & Culture
4:55 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

It's October 1st. The beginning of the new state and new federal fiscal years have come in with a bang. The news making headlines across the country: the partial government shutdown. The first federal shutdown in 17 years.

Democrats and Republicans in Washington D.C. were unable to compromise on a continuing resolution to fund the federal government.

But, what does this mean for you here in Michigan?

Well, 41% of Michigan's budget comes from the federal government, but a shutdown doesn't mean all of that money will stop flowing immediately - though, it will slow.

Read more
Education
4:49 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Impacts of new school consolidation law felt in northern Michigan

An empty classroom.
Sarah Hulett Michigan Radio

A record number of Michigan schools are struggling to stay in the black.

So far, the headlines have focused on the fiscal problems of some of the state’s more populated counties.

A new state law allows state officials to dissolve and consolidate small schools with big problems.

Read more
Stateside
4:43 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Author revisits crime and corruption of yesteryear in 'Detroit Shuffle'

A map of Detroit from 1923, around the time author D.E. Johnson writes about in "Detroit Shuffle."
user davecito Flickr

Corruption. Political shenanigans. Murder. 

That may sound like life in a big city in 2013. 

But Kalamazoo-based writer D.E. Johnson says think again. His latest novel is set in the Detroit of 1912. From his research, there was plenty of crime and corruption happening in those good old days. 

Read more
Stateside
4:39 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

How deeply do major university donors influence higher education in America?

Real estate mogul Stephen Ross, left, donated $200 million to the University of Michigan in September.
Teresa Mathew The Michigan Daily

It was a gift — with a capital "G."

Real estate developer and Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross made big headlines last month with an eye-popping $200-million gift to the University of Michigan.

The donation is earmarked for the university's athletic department and the business school that already bears the name of Stephen Ross from an earlier gift of $113 million.

Read more
Stateside
4:24 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

When grandma is head of the household

Lynn Nww, clinical instructor and Kinship Care Education Center Coordinator at Michigan State University.
Michigan State University

It's called "Kinship Care."

It means relatives stepping in to raise a child, and it happens for many reasons.

Whether it's parents being deployed to combat in the Middle East, physical or mental illness, or incarceration, all over the country, grandparents or other relatives are being called on to raise a child. Today, more than 4.9 million children are living in grandparent-headed households.

Read more
Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Michigan's State Budget Director weighs in on the government shutdown

The Capitol building.
U.S. Congress congress.gov

Today, the federal government partially shut down, after Congress couldn’t reach a compromise on a budgetary resolution.

How is Michigan being hit by the partial shutdown in Washington?

To answer that question, we talked to State Budget Director John E. Nixon.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:11 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Major delays on day one of healthcare exchange

A woman receiving a shot.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

Michigan’s new online healthcare exchange went live today, meaning Michiganders would now have the opportunity to check out healthcare plans and subsidies available to them under the Affordable Care Act.

But the launch didn’t go without a couple of hiccups.

As the exchanges went live on the web, consumers encountered error messages, saying the high traffic to the exchanges would mean delays with actually looking at the plans.

Read more
Stateside
4:45 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

How will the partial government shut down affect Michigan?

The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, or "Super Committee," failed to come up with a compromise to reduce the deficit. Michigan members of the Super Committee spoke about the experience.
U.S. Congress congress.gov

We are just hours away from what appears likely to be a partial government shutdown.

The U.S. Senate, controlled by Democrats, and the Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives, have been unable to come to an agreement on a continuing resolution to fund the federal government.  If no agreement is reached today, which appears likely, the government begins shutting down at midnight.

David Shepardson, Washington D.C. based reporter for the Detroit News, joined us today from Washington.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:36 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Employers should be careful about what they see on social media

Flickr user rutty Flickr

Ever since the rise of Facebook we’ve heard the warning: be careful about what you put on Facebook, watch what you post online. What if a prospective employer checks out your Facebook page and sees something that tanks you for that new job?

But, in his recent article in Crain’s Detroit Business, writer Chris Gautz tells us it’s the employer who needs to tread lightly and carefully in looking at social media, or the online presence of potential hires, and he warns companies to be careful in taking action against employees for their Facebook or Twitter postings.

Chris Gautz joined us today to tell us more.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:31 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Livingston County is getting a pinball museum

Flickr user Needle Flickr

Clay Harrell has made saving pinball machines from the scrap heap his mission.

He has been collecting, repairing, and restoring pinball machines -- rescuing unwanted old machines and bringing them back to their former glory.

Now he’s moving his formidable pinball collection into a vacant VFW Hall in Green Oak Township in Livingston County. There he plans to create a private museum of pinball machines.

Clay Harrell joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:21 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Stateside for Monday, September 30th, 2013

Special Education students and their families in Michigan are about one month into the new school year and they're feeling the impact of the federal sequester cuts. Today, we looked at the cuts to special ed funding and find out what it means to schools and students.

 

And, a look at social media etiquette and your job--what's allowed and what's not.

And, one Detroit musician, and AP reporter, talks about his family's deep roots in Motown.

Also, we spoke with one man who has made it his mission to save pinball machines from the scrap yard. He plans to open up a private pinball museum.

First on the show, we are just hours away from what appears likely to be a partial government shutdown.

The U.S. Senate, controlled by Democrats and the Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives, have been unable to come to an agreement on a continuing resolution to fund the federal government.  If no agreement is reached today, which appears likely, the government begins shutting down at midnight.

David Shepardson, Washington D.C. based reporter for the Detroit News, joined us today from Washington.

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