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Stateside Staff

Ginger Johnson, the founder of Women Enjoying Beer, and the author of the book "How to Market Beer to Women: Don't Sell Me A Pink Hammer"
Courtesy of Ginger Johnson

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Do women drink beer? It's a dumb question to be sure, but watching any random assortment of beer commercials, one might start to wonder. After all, the vast majority of beer marketing revolves around men: men watching football, men laughing at jokes, men saying "whassup."

To Ginger Johnson, the founder of Women Enjoying Beer, and the author of the book How to Market Beer to Women: Don't Sell Me A Pink Hammerthe tendency of beer marketing to ignore women is not only insulting. It's also a bad business strategy.

A full Senate vote on Besty DeVos' U.S. education secretary nomination is expected next week.
BetsyDeVos.com

Betsy DeVos will have to wait another week for her Senate confirmation hearing.

The West Michigan billionaire and education reform advocate is President-elect Donald Trump's choice for secretary of education. The hearing at the U.S. Capitol was originally scheduled for tomorrow in front of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Now it has been moved to Wednesday, Jan. 17. Why was the hearing rescheduled? 

Michigan Radio's Lansing Bureau Chief Rick Pluta joined Stateside from Washington D.C. to answer that very question.

The realities of a world economy aren't just being felt at big companies like General Motors or Ford. Small businesses are feeling the strain of foreign competition.
earl53 / Morguefile

The Next Idea

The realities of a world economy aren't just being felt at big companies like General Motors or Ford. Small businesses are feeling the strain of foreign competition.

Our latest contributor to The Next Idea is directing a federal program aimed at helping small local businesses adjust to that foreign competition.

Stateside 1.9.2017

Jan 9, 2017

For the first time in seven years, an elected Detroit school board is in place. Today, we talk with Sonya Mays, one of the board members. And, a public health expert goes back in history to find the true cause of the Flint water crisis.

NAIAS.com

The North American International Auto Show opened today with media previews and model rollouts.

The Car, Utility and Truck of the Year honors were announced

The Chevy Bolt EV was named the Car of the Year. It's made at the Orion Assembly plant in Oakland County. 

Autotrader Senior Analyst, Michelle Krebs said all three vehicles "raise the bar" in their category.  

What caused the Flint water crisis? Rick Sadler from Michigan State University argues the true cause of Flint's water disaster goes back decades.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

What really caused the Flint water crisis?

The obvious and well-known answer is the April 2014 decision to start drawing the city's drinking water from the Flint River. That, in turn, caused corrosion in the city's lead water pipes, which caused lead to leach into the water.

Others point to Governor Rick Snyder's appointment of an emergency manager to control Flint's affairs. That happened in late 2011.

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Michigan State University public health expert and urban geographer Rick Sadler argues the true cause of Flint's water disaster goes back decades.

Write Michigan authors take part in a book signing
Kent District Library

The Write Michigan short story contest is the only fiction contest exclusive to Michigan writers.

It's a joint effort of the Kent District Library and Schuler Books in Grand Rapids. The contest is embarking on its fifth year and submissions are up by 200% from last year.

Heidi Nagel from the Kent District Library joined Stateside to talk about the contest.

Matt Katzenberger / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

This is an important week for Detroit schools. For the first time in seven years, an elected school board is in place. The board takes control of the schools that have been run for nearly 20 years by state-appointed managers. 63 candidates were on the ballot. The voters chose seven of them to make up the new school board.

One of those is Sonya Mays. She graduated from Detroit Renaissance High School and then went on to the University of Michigan, where she worked her way to a bachelor's degree, an MBA and then her law degree.

Stateside 1.6.2017

Jan 6, 2017

Today, we learn why it's harder than we thought for kids to do better than their parents socioeconomically. And, we hear why biologists are saying Earth is in the midst of a sixth mass extinction.

A map of the area in Oscoda Township surrounding the now closed Wurtsmith Air Force Base is shown. The red area is the base, while the area outlined in yellow is considered the affected area.
Courtesy of District Health Department No. 2

There’s an irony in Michigan. We are surrounded by the Great Lakes and have access to vast supplies of water. However, there are plenty of examples of water issues across the state. From the Flint water crisis, to the city of Ann Arbor's problem with 1,4 dioxane in the ground water. There's also dioxin in Midland and the oil spill in the Kalamazoo River

Recently, we added the contamination near Oscoda to that list of water problems in Michigan. The source looks to be the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base, which closed in 1993.

Environment Agency Survey Open / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

We could be on the cusp of learning a lot more about the native cultures that inhabited Michigan before European settlement.

Meghan Howey is a researcher at the University of New Hampshire joined Stateside to talk about how she and her team has been using technology to find Native American cache pits. 

GS Photo | Western Michigan Athletics

Western Michigan University Coach P.J. Fleck has announced he’ll leave the Broncos for the Minnesota Golden Gophers next year.

Fleck led what John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio sports commentator, called a “dormant” team to a successful 13-1 season. The Broncos were the only team, other than Alabama, to enter the bowl games undefeated.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The new Michigan Legislature convenes for its first day of the session next Wednesday. What can we expect in 2017?

Ken Sikkema, a senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants and a former Republican legislative leader, joined Stateside for our weekly political roundup and looked ahead to what he expects to be a "more conservative" House of Representatives in Lansing.

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nakashi / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The possibility that any American, through some combination of hard work and talent, can rise above the circumstances of his or her parents, is a central part of the American Dream.

Tom Benson / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

There have been five mass extinction events on planet Earth over the past 540 million years. Among these are the asteroid strike that is thought to have killed off the dinosaurs roughly 65 million years ago, and four less infamous extinctions, such as the “Permian event” that occurred 250 million years ago.

During these periods, at least three-quarters of all species on earth went extinct. The dinosaurs vanished, as did the giant insects of the Permian era.

Biologists now suggest that a sixth extinction is underway.

Stateside 1.5.2017

Jan 5, 2017

In conversation with a sheriff and a researcher, we hear how immigration raids affect communities and law enforcement. And, we learn why most people are "either all in or all against" the proposed nuclear waste site near Lake Huron.

Dave Doe / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Next Idea

The North American International Auto Show begins its media previews on Sunday in Detroit. The show opens to the public on Jan. 14.

Along with the gleaming displays of new vehicles, the show will be a gathering place for innovators from many backgrounds, focusing on the future of mobility.

U.S. Supreme Court

Many would consider arguing a case before the U.S. Supreme Court to be the pinnacle of a lawyer’s career. For lawyers facing that opportunity, a new study offers advice.

In a nutshell: don’t get flashy and don’t try to tug on “judicial heartstrings” when writing briefs for the big case.

The Pincause pin was created in Ann Arbor and is being sold all over the world to support women's rights causes.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

"Little Pin. Big Goal."

That's the motto of Pincause, the brainchild of two Ann Arbor entrepreneurs.

Katy Lind and Nate Stevens have designed a pin supporting women's rights. It's a good bet those pins will be on a lot of lapels and collars at the upcoming Women's March on Washington the day after Donald Trump's Inauguration.

According to Daniel Howes, if automakers have to pay more in taxes and tariffs for building outside the U.S., the cost of vehicles could go up for American consumers.
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

The U.S. auto industry came into the crosshairs of President-elect Donald Trump's Twitter feed this week. Trump aimed a Tweet straight at General Motors, grumbling about GM's building of the Chevy Cruze in Mexico.

Lopez: "[Immigration] raids affect all sorts of relationships. Relationships between individuals, between family members, between Latino communities and white communities, and also between immigrant and Latino communities and local police departments."
J J / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

As he campaigned for the presidency, one of Donald Trump's most consistent messages was aimed at undocumented immigrants. At one point, he promised a deportation force to remove all undocumented immigrants.

That message helped get him elected.

It remains to be seen what will actually come to pass once Mr. Trump takes office in two weeks, but the increased possibility of immigration raids is out there.

A diagram of the proposed deep geologic repository.
Ontario Power Generation

The Canadian company that’s proposing to bury its nuclear waste in an underground site near Lake Huron doubled down this week on that controversial site.

Ontario Power Generation was ordered to do a study of alternative sites – options other than the proposed 2,200-foot underground repository at the Bruce power plant near Kincardine, right by Lake Huron.

That report came out last week.

Stateside 1.4.2017

Jan 4, 2017

Today, Gretchen Whitmer explains why she became the first candidate to announce a run for governor in 2018. And, we hear about a police re-training program focusing on a mentality shift for officers: from warrior to guardian.

Jeremy Korzeniewski / Autoblog.com

The Consumer Electronics Show, an annual display of the world's most fantastical gadgets, starts tomorrow in Las Vegas.

Traditionally, the show has been devoted to gizmos that belong in your house or your hand: video game systems, televisions, home appliances, cell phones, and so on. Michigan’s largest manufacturing and engineering firms – the auto-makers and their suppliers – haven’t had much to contribute.

But with the growing role of technology in the automotive industry, particularly as it relates to mobility, Michigan companies are taking a bigger role at the CES.

flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The 2017 year is just a few days old, and we're already looking ahead to 2018.

In Michigan, that will mean a new governor to replace term-limited Rick Snyder.

On Tuesday, Democrat Gretchen Whitmer became the first candidate to step forward into the ring. The former Senate minority leader filed the paperwork with the Secretary of State which allows her to set up a committee to run for governor.

The mosaic workshop at the Washtenaw County Youth Center
Juan Javier Pesdacor

There are more than 1,600 juveniles now living in state facilities in Michigan.

Most young people in residential treatment or detention centers are people of color. Many often become defined by their experience, both legally and socially.

A new documentary film Determined 2 Make It tells their stories and shows how art, music, photography and more can be powerful forms of self-expression for incarcerated youth.

President-elect Donald Trump tweeted: "General Motors is sending Mexican made model of Chevy Cruze to US car dealers-tax free across border. Make in U.S.A or pay big border tax!"
Andrea_44 / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

President-elect Trump was busy on Twitter Tuesday morning, this time firing a warning shot across the bow of General Motors.

To quote Mr Trump: "General Motors is sending Mexican made model of Chevy Cruze to US car dealers-tax free across border. Make in U.S.A or pay big border tax!"

Michelle Krebs, a senior analyst for Autotrader, joined Stateside to talk about the situation between the president-elect and the power he is attempting to show over the auto industry.

Stateside 1.3.2017

Jan 3, 2017

Today, we talk about gerrymandering and how it contributes to polarization of our political system. And, we hear how some researchers turn to biological evolution for clues to improve artificial intelligence.

This is HAL 9000, antagonist in the novel (and film) 2001: A Space Odyssey. Hintze said HAL is an "expert system" that's likely a type 1 machine, or poorly designed type 2, that compares a collection of rules and statements with the environment.
Erin Williamson / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

What could artificial intelligence (AI) mean for us in the future? And when might intelligent machines and technology be at a point where they become an integral part of our lives?

Those are the questions that Michigan State University researcher Arend Hintze explores.

He's an assistant professor of Integrative Biology and Computer Science and Engineering, and he runs the Hintze Lab, where they research the evolution of natural and artificial intelligence.

Saeed Khan, a lecturer at Wayne State University, wrote an article comparing blanket assessments of Trump supporters to the false equivalency sometimes made between Muslims and terrorists.
Photo courtesy of Saeed Khan

Since Donald Trump was elected to be the 45th President of the United States, the reactions, both for and against, have been forceful. 

Many Americans are afraid of life under President Trump, based on campaign messages that regularly targeted people based on religion, gender, ethnicity, and race.

And they wonder: why would someone vote for a candidate whose rhetoric was so often hateful?

One possible conclusion is that those who did vote for Trump must share those hateful views.

Saeed Khan, a lecturer at Wayne State University who also teaches a course on Muslim-Christian diversity at Rochester College, is encouraging a more measured view.

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