Stateside Staff

Ribbon cutting ceremony for the new Elijah J. McCoy Patent and Trademark Office in Detroit in 2012
flickr user Senator Stabenow / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Next Idea

Innovation means new ideas, and new ideas mean investments, all of which need to be protected.

That’s where the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office comes in.

Three years ago, they opened their first office outside of Washington D.C., and chose to put it in Detroit.

What does that mean for Michigan inventors, entrepreneurs, startups and researchers?

flickr user Jim Sorbie / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Next Idea

As The Next Idea continues to explore innovation in Michigan, it’s clear that amidst the new technology and new breakthroughs, some concepts stand the test of time.

One such concept was summed up by Ralph Waldo Emerson:

"If a man has good corn or wood, or boards, or pigs, to sell, or can make better chairs or knives, crucibles or church organs, than anybody else, you will find a broad hard-beaten road to his house, though it be in the woods."

That was the key to the success of Michigan inventor, businessman and innovator Webster Marble.

Today on Stateside:

Daniel Howes / https://twitter.com/DanielHowes_TDN

All week long, Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes is accompanying more than 20 Michigan CEOs as they examine the thriving economy of Israel, looking for lessons that can be applied to Michigan. 

migop.org

This week, Michigan Republicans marked the second anniversary of their outreach office in Detroit.

The concept of selling the GOP in solidly Democratic Detroit, and opening an outreach office there, came at a time when more Republicans on the national level called for the party to be more inclusive, to reach out to African-American and Hispanic voters.

Currently, there are no African-American Republicans serving in the state Legislature, in Michigan's congressional delegation, or as directors of the state departments in Michigan or in major stateside offices.

MSU's Eli and Edyth Broad Art Museum viewed from Grand River Ave
Wikimedia user Dj1997 / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Michigan State University’s Eli and Edyth Broad Art Museum is hard to miss.

The steel structure looks like some kind of strange spaceship among the traditional ivory-covered brick buildings around it.

November 10 marks the museum’s third birthday.

In his story for Lansing City Pulse, Larry Cosentino spells out the reasons the Broad is at a crucial time in its young history.

food, leftovers
Kathleen Franklin/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Great Depression really marked the golden age of leftovers.

They were meant to be slipped into a pot pie, suspended in a jello ring, buried in a casserole or a meatloaf.

There's a lot to be learned from studying Americans' relationships with leftovers.

Today on Stateside:

Michigan roads
user nirbhao / Flickr

    

A late-night deal to fund road repair, construction and other transportation issues barely passed the Michigan House on Tuesday. After years of stalled debate, deals gone nowhere and a voter-rejected referendum, Governor Snyder is now reviewing a bill that partly solves the road funding question in Michigan.

Michigan Public Radio Network reporter Jake Neher explains the ins and outs of the bill in the interview above. 

Shayan Sanyal/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Aging inmates are the fastest-growing population in Michigan’s prisons.

This has presented a critical challenge: how to provide end-of-life care to those inmates.

That’s where a prison hospice program called CHOICES comes into play. It stands for Choose, Health Options, Initiate Care, and Educate Self.

screenshot

The new indie film Superior is set in the summer of 1969, as two lifelong friends grab their bicycles and set out on a 1,300-mile journey around Lake Superior.

  Today on Stateside:

Habitat for Humanity volunteers constructing a house in 2007
wikimedia user Jmabel / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Habitat for Humanity’s mission statement is simple and straightforward: “a world where everyone has a decent place to live.”

And now, thanks to a special partnership between Habitat for Humanity of Oakland County and Lawrence Technological University in Southfield, graduate architecture students will be coming up with ways to make those houses really fit the needs of the people who will live in them.

Courtesy of Daniel Howes / https://twitter.com/DanielHowes_TDN

This week, more than 20 of Michigan's top CEOs are on what you might call a field trip.

They're visiting Israel to discover what it took to transform that nation from virtually nothing into one of the most innovative economies in the world, all in the span of just 70 years.

Gordon Young

It's no secret that the city of Flint is wrestling with huge challenges. A water crisis, high crime rates and a shrinking population.

But, despite its difficulties and dangers, international students are coming to Flint. 

The Grand Rapids Symphony is asking musicians to make more concessions in contract talks
flickr user Steven Depolo / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

These are challenging times for one of Michigan’s symphony orchestras.

The Grand Rapids Federation of Musicians is still trying to come to a contract agreement with the Grand Rapids Symphony. Its  four-year contract expired at the end of August.

But the musicians continue to play as bargaining goes on. They’re trying to regain some of what they gave up to keep the symphony afloat during the Great Recession.

Sportsman Tracker / Facebook

The app Sportsman Tracker was developed in Grand Rapids by Jeff Courter, the company's CEO.

"A lot of times you just want to know what’s going on in your area," he says. "If it’s fishing, you want to know what’s biting, what’s going on, what are people catching around you.”

Today on Stateside: 

U.S. troops almost buried by parcels do their best to handle the holiday mail, ca. 1944
Public Domain

If ever there was a case of love at first sight, it happened on January 17, 1942 at a dance in Asheville, North Carolina.

On that night, 21-year-old Billee Gray met 28-year-old Private Charles Kiley, and after just a couple of weekend dates, they knew they were meant to be together.

It wasn’t long before Charles was shipped off to fight in World War II, but the two stayed in touch and forged their love through hundreds of letters.

Charles and Billee’s daughter, son, and son-in-law have brought these letters together in a book: Writing the War: Chronicles of a World War Two Correspondent.

Split Rock Lighthouse - The Annual Lighting to Commemorate the Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
Pete Markham/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Did you know the Edmund Fitzgerald sank in a fierce storm on November 10, 1975?

As Gordon Lightfoot wrote in his song about the Fitzgerald, which sank in the waters of Lake Superior:

That good ship and true was a bone to be chewed
When the gales of November came early.

What's with these powerful winds and storms as we move from October to November?

John U. Bacon

Michigan Radio’s sports commentator John U. Bacon joins us again for this week’s sports roundup.

The Michigan House of Representatives in Lansing
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

There were feelings of optimism earlier this week in Lansing that the state Senate might just pass a road funding plan the House passed the week before.

But, once again, that optimism has fallen flat, as the House adjourned without a vote after about eight hours of discussion.

Lars Plougmann

Millennials are the largest generation in America, making up an entire third of the population.

They’re also the least likely to vote.

A report from Tufts University says that less than 20% of people age 18 to 29 voted in the 2014 election.

Andrew Koehlinger wants to do something about that. He’s the project director for VoteSpotter, an app that seeks to get younger voters engaged in the politics.

Today on Stateside:

  • This week there was some optimism that the state Senate might pass a road funding plan, but it didn’t happen. Rick Pluta, co-host of It’s Just Politics and Daniel Howes, business columnist at the Detroit News, joined us to talk roads.

Today on Stateside:

Armenians being deported from Turkey ca. 1915.
flickr user Narek / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Dan Yessian is one of the most prolific and respected composers of commercial music.

His Farmington Hills-based company has clients all over the world.

You’ve heard his tunes helping to sell everything from Little Caesars Pizza to Chevy, Cadillac, Chrysler, United Airlines, Lexus, Ikea, and so many more brands.

But it’s safe to say his latest musical undertaking is especially close to his heart.

Rep. Dan Kildee is part of a bipartisan group that is pushing to extend the Export-Import Bank's charter
Steve Carmody

This week, a bipartisan group of House members is  joining forces in an attempt to revive the Export-Import Bank.

The Ex-Im Bank, as it’s known, is a federal agency that finances exports. It’s been around for 80 years, but stopped doing business July 1, after House leaders let its charter lapse.

Among the lawmakers trying to get the bank up and running again is Michigan Congressman Dan Kildee, D-Flint.

SAM KIM / FLICKR

A package of bills now being considered by the state House could bring big changes to driving in Michigan.

The bills would boost speed limits on rural freeways based on scientific studies of typical traffic flow.

Backers say allowing traffic to go 80 miles per hour on rural freeways will end artificially low limits.

It will match what drivers are doing anyway and allow more drivers to drive at similar speeds. They believe the result would be safer roadways for everyone.

"Fearless. Fresh. Made in Detroit.”

That's the motto of the Detroit Public Theatre, whose mission is to produce theater with top writers, directors, and actors in Midtown Detroit's growing cultural district.

The Detroit Public Theatre's inaugural season begins Friday at the Max M. Fisher Music Center, home of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Stateside's Cynthia Canty spoke with Courtney Burkett and Sarah Winkler, founding co-artistic directors. 

Library of Congress

One hundred years ago, three women took a cross-country road trip from San Francisco to Washington DC to collect half a million signatures demanding passage of a Constitutional Amendment giving women the right to vote.

Maine-based author Anne Gass is recreating that historic trip and blogging about it along the way.

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