Stateside Staff

Terrance Heath/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Are you unable to resist making judgments about the person who makes a grammar mistake?

Ah, wait till you hear about some interesting new research from the University of Michigan.

It gives us some insight into the personality of the critic.

Robin Queen is professor and chair of the Linguistics Department at the University of Michigan and co-author of the new study along with Julie E. Boland, professor of psychology and linguistics. 

Stateside 5.11.2016

May 12, 2016

Free Press reporter Keith Matheny and Enbridge’s Jason Manshum talked about a 1980 oil spill in the U.P. and whether more spill sites should be reexamined.

flickr user volkspider / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Does a typo or grammatical error really bug you?

Are you unable to resist making judgments about the person who committed that linguistic faux pas?

Well, some interesting new research from the University of Michigan might just teach you a thing or two about yourself. 

Robin Queen is professor and chair of the Linguistics Department at U of M. Queen joined Cynthia Canty on Stateside to offer some insight into the personality of the critic. 

Senators Jim Stamas and Jim Ananich at a hearing on the Flint water health emergency with local officials and members of the public at the University of Michigan
senatorjimstamas.com / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The legislative committee in charge of examining what went wrong with the Flint water crisis has concluded.

When Midland Republican Sen. Jim Stamas was appointed chairman, he promised to take testimony on the mistakes that led to the Flint water disaster "at all levels of government,"and to ensure that something like this never happens again. 

However, neither Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder nor any of the former emergency managers in charge of the city of Flint were called to testify. 

The Asian Tiger Mosquito is a carrier of Zika virus
flicker user coniferconifer / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The state of Michigan is beginning diagnostic testing for three viral diseases: Zika, dengue, and chikungunya.

Each of these is carried by mosquitos, which many Michiganders know are all too common in the summertime. 

Dr. Eden Wells, the chief medical executive for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, joined Stateside to tell us more about the testing and how concerned Michiganders should be.

flickr user amboo who? / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Gender identity has become a big issue in the public discourse over the last few years. There has been a heated debate over legislation involving so-called "bathroom bills" and others involving the fight for legal protections for members of the LGBTQ community.

Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom are saying that Britain has a long way to go before transgender people achieve equality. Some MPs are seeking to follow the Republic of Ireland's lead and pass laws that would allow people to declare which gender they are, regardless of what doctors or anyone else says.

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero has not spoken about why Lansing's former city attorney Janene McIntyre resigned, nor why she was given $160,000 in salary and accrued benefits upon doing so.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There are still unanswered questions and a growing pile of legal bills swirling around the sudden resignation of Lansing's former city attorney.

Janene McIntyre resigned March 4, but was still paid $160,000 in salary and accrued benefits. Now legal costs related to the separation are mounting.

In the meantime, neither McIntyre nor Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero will say why she left and why she was given such a generous payout. 

Stateside 5.10.2016

May 10, 2016

Judi Brown Clarke joined us to discuss the mysteries surrounding the sudden resignation of Lansing's former city attorney. And, Dr. Eden Wells laid out how concerned residents of Michigan should be about Zika, dengue and chikungunya.

Laura Swanson

When Ingham County Prosecutor Stuart Dunnings III was charged with a wide range of prostitution-related crimes, it managed to refocus attention on sex crimes and human trafficking in Michigan.  Victims of these crimes include people forced to sell their bodies for sex and people used for cheap labor.  

Break the Chain, a new documentary on human trafficking in Michigan, premiers next month. 

Filmmaker Laura Swanson and human trafficking survivor Debbie joined Cynthia Canty on today's Stateside.

 

Sen. Gary Peters joined Cynthia Canty in the studio for today's "Stateside"
Mercedes Mejia

There are some important issues that seem to be mired in Republican resistance on Capitol Hill, federal aid for Flint, and hearings on a new Justice for the United States Supreme Court among them.

Senator Gary Peters, D-Mich., joined Cynthia Canty on today's Stateside to talk about the latest developments and what it might take to get these efforts running through the Senate.

computer screen
Ryan Grimes

The Lapeer City Police Department now has a designated area in its parking lot for internet sale exchanges. 

The area is well-lit and under video surveillance, giving people a safe, neutral place to conduct an exchange. 

Lapeer Police Chief Todd Alexander sat down with Stateside's Cynthia Canty to talk about the practice and offer some advice to those looking to conduct internet purchase exchanges. 

Detroit teachers want a forensic audit, so they held a lemonade stand to raise money and public awareness at Detroit's Eastern Market this weekend.
flickr user Rob Bertholf / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Detroit Public Schools has been controlled by the state since 2009. 

Yet, the latest emergency manager says without an infusion of cash from the state, the district won't be able to meet its financial obligations after June 30. 

Stateside 5.9.2016

May 9, 2016

On today's show, Sen. Gary Peters joins us in-studio to talk about Flint funding, choosing a new Supreme Court justice and autonomous cars. And, Shobita Parthasarathy shares some lessons that Michigan could learn from India's commitment to grassroots innovation.

Stateside 5.6.2016

May 6, 2016

On today's show, we take a look at the history of the Mexican repatriation. A new study shows that when it comes to marriage, "opposites attract" no longer applies. And, we wonder whether Donald Trump isn't just a national version of Michigan's Geoffrey Fieger.

Mexican and U.S. flags
Flickr user Ken Bosma

Throughout this year's presidential campaigns, there's been a lot of talk about immigration in this country. We've heard proposals ranging from reform that would be a roadmap to citizenship, to building a wall between the United States and Mexico.

We've had immigration arguments for a long time, about as long as the U.S. has been a country, and these debates always escalate when the economy takes a downturn. 

When there are labor shortages, we turn to Mexico and encourage immigration. But the moment the economy tanks, we want to send those workers packing back to Mexico. 

A prison block
flickr user Thomas Hawk / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

There's a category in which Michigan beats countries like China, Russia, Thailand, Cuba and Iran. Michigan imprisons its citizens at a far higher rate.

And Michigan is actually below the national average. States such as Louisiana, Georgia, Texas and Mississippi imprison as many as one out of every 100 residents. 

The U.S. turns to incarceration much more readily than the rest of the world. 

Zach Gorchow sees some parallels between Donald Trump's presidential campaign strategy and Geoffrey Fieger's 1998 run for Michigan Governor
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Republicans have one candidate left standing for the party's presidential nomination.

Senator Ted Cruz and Governor John Kasich both suspended their campaigns this week, leaving Donald Trump as the presumptive nominee.

Betsey Stevenson is a co-author on the study
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy

Last month the New York Times published a piece entitled Equality in Marriage Grows, and So Does Class Divide

It reveals whom we choose to marry, generally, has changed over the decades and now it's more often a marriage of equals rather than a bread-winner marrying a homemaker. 

Stateside 5.5.2016

May 5, 2016

On today's show, we touch base with the Michigan Radio It's Just Politics team to help wrap our minds around the DPS plan narrowly passed by the state House. We speak with a University of Michigan researcher about what makes people really care about climate change. We also learn about spider venom and how it could hold the holy grail of natural pesticides.

Stateside 5.4.2016

May 4, 2016

In a State of Opportunity special, we take a look at the issues surrounding being young and transgender in Michigan. 

The state is in the midst of a controversy surrounding transgender people’s access to public bathrooms.

Stateside 5.3.2016

May 3, 2016

We speak with Eric Lupher about the chance that the Village of Richmond might become the first village in Michigan to disincorporate. And state Rep. Sheldon Neeley, D-Flint, also joins us to talk about whether the state has been doing enough to help Flint.

WMUK

After an Uber driver shot 14-year-old Abbie Kopf and seven others in Kalamazoo in February, the "warrior princess" has made an impressive recovery after nearly being pronounced dead in the hospital. Now she is home trying to adjust to normal life with her family. Her father, Gene, joins Stateside to talk about her recovery and how Abbie is doing.

President Barack Obama
Pete Souza / White House

When President Obama visits Flint on Wednesday, many are wondering if Gov. Snyder will meet with him. Early signs indicated "no," but this morning, Snyder asked to meet with the president and Flint's Mayor Karen Weaver. The It's Just Politics team of Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta tries to make sense of it all.

David Williss / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

State lawmakers are working on a bill that would require schools in Michigan to teach students about genocide, including the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust. Corey Harbaugh is making it his personal mission to ensure that teachers in Michigan have resources and models about Holocaust education and to help them teach it as well.

The NFL's Lombardi Trophy on display
Mobilus In Mobili / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon breaks down how the Detroit Lions did at the NFL Draft, which included the selection of two Michigan Wolverines. Bacon also talks about the NCAA reversing its decision to ban satellite football camps.

Listen to the full interview below.

Stateside 5.2.2016

May 2, 2016

Today, we hear the latest from the struggling Detroit public school system and why teachers are staging a sick-out. We also hear from the father of 14-year-old Abbie Kopf. Kopf is recovering after she and seven others were shot by an Uber driver last Feb.

Stateside 4.29.2016

Apr 29, 2016
  • Gov. Rick Snyder and a recent MLive.com editorial are calling for the state to approve additional funding for the city of Flint.

Stateside 4.28.2016

Apr 28, 2016
  • Daniel Howes joins us to talk about Dan Gilbert's newest plans for downtown Detroit.
     
  • Upper Peninsula Poet Laureate Andrea Scarpino is on a mission to get us to give up our old misconceptions about poetry.
     
  • Poet Laureate of Grand Rapids L.S. Klatt reads his poem, "FORD."

Stateside 4.26.2016

Apr 26, 2016
  • A planned vote on the 180-day signature window on gathering signatures for statewide petition drives came to a sudden end Monday, when State Board of Canvassers Vice-Chair Norm Shinkle abruptly left the meeting.

Stateside 4.25.2016

Apr 25, 2016
  • Two years ago, the city of Flint switched its water source from the Detroit River to the Flint River. This marked the beginning of a water crisis that has received international attention and continues to this day. MLive.com/Flint Journal reporter Ron Fonger was one of the first journalists to cover the story. Fonger reflects back on the last two years and what's ahead for the city of Flint. 

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