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Stateside
4:55 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

New language on 2014 ballot could get wolf hunting banned in Michigan if passed

Michigan's gray wolf population is estimated to be 687 animals. The recovery goal for the population is between 250-300 wolves.
Tracy Brooks/Mission Wolf/USFWS

An interview with Rick Pluta.

The group Keep Michigan Wolves Protected has filed language with the Secretary of State to put another petition on the 2014 ballot. The group wants to ban wolf hunting in Michigan.

If the language is approved, the group will try and collect more than 160 thousand signatures to put the question to voters.

Rick Pluta, the Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network joined us today to discuss what this new ballot will do.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:43 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Census data show men catching up to women in number and longevity

Flickr

An interview with Kurt Metzger, the director of Data Driven Detroit.

Women of Michigan, something's going on.

Somehow, the "men's team" is gaining ground on the "women's team." Census results show a surprising trend: the state's male population is growing... and men are living longer.

Our go-to guy when it comes to crunching Census data is Kurt Metzger. He's the director of Data Driven Detroit and he joined us today to discuss the new statistics.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:41 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

Do you trust your government? What about your government? Do your elected leaders trust you?

Disapproval rates of Congress are at all-time lows - gridlock, and indecision. Can we change the dynamic, and what does it mean going forward?

And census results show a surprising trend: the state's male population is growing. We took a look at what's behind the numbers.

Also we spoke with Michael Narlock, head of Astronomy at the Cranbrook Institute of Science, about the best places to go in Michigan for stargazing this summer.

And Darrin Camilleri, President of the Michigan Federation of College Democrats, joined us to talk about increasing tuition and raised interested rates for student loans.

Also we continued our week-long series of stories from immigrants about what America means to them.

Today we heard from Linda Steinke, whose family came to the U.S. from Iran in the 1970s when her father had the opportunity to work in the auto industry.

First on the show, the group Keep Michigan Wolves Protected has filed language with the Secretary of State to put another petition on the 2014 ballot. The group wants to ban wolf hunting in Michigan.

If the language is approved, the group will try and collect more than 160 thousand signatures to put the question to voters.

Rick Pluta, the Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network joined us today.

Stateside
4:33 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Where to go and what to look for if you're stargazing this summer

User: seriousfun MorgueFile.com

An interview with Michael Narlock, the head of Astronomy at the Cranbrook Institute of Science.

For centuries and centuries, we’ve been fascinated by the night sky. As we relax into the summer months we figured we’d spend a little time taking a look at what we’ll see when we look up at the night sky here in Michigan.

Michael Narlock is the head of Astronomy at the Cranbrook Institute of Science, and he joined us today with tips and strategies for summer stargazing.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:32 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Governor Snyder continues to push for Medicaid expansion

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is pushing the state Senate to vote on Medicaid expansion.
Gov. Snyder Facebook

An interview with Governor Rick Snyder.

Governor Rick Snyder is continuing his travels around the state today in southeast Michigan to push for an expansion of Medicaid. Gov. Snyder wants to expand the program – using federal funds – to hundreds of thousands of low-income adults.

Snyder has criticized fellow Republicans in the Senate for leaving Lansing for their summer recess without voting on the measure. The state House had already approved the legislation.

Governor Snyder joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:27 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

What books should you consider reading this summer?

Flickr/Sarah Sosiak

An interview with writer and poet Keith Taylor.

Now that summer has truly taken us into her embrace, we’ve been thinking of some of our favorite summer pleasures. And it was fairly unanimous: one of the sweetest times of summer is lounging around in the sun, maybe on a beach, maybe your favorite spot on your back porch or yard, and in your hands is a good book.

Keith Taylor coordinates the undergraduate program in creative writing at the University of Michigan, he is a poet and a writer, and he is simply the best at uncovering hidden gems for us to read and enjoy.

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Stateside
5:23 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Michigan is number one in the country for small business loans

DPS gets $231 million short term loan from state
User thinkpanama Flickr

An interview with David Sowerby, an economist with Loomis Sayles in Bloomfield Hills.

Michigan is number one in the nation for loans being issued to small businesses.

Turns out the Small Business Administration's Michigan district backed 1,221 loans to the tune of nearly $344 million in the first eight months of this fiscal year, which puts the SBA's Michigan district office at the top of the heap in terms of 7A lending.

David Sowerby is an economist with Loomis Sayles in Bloomfield Hills, and he joined us today to discuss what this means for the state.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:21 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Michigan couple sets out to improve the world with pie

Steve Snodgrass Flickr

An interview with Sarah Fertig of Pie It Forward.

Making the world better, one piece of pie at a time.

That is the mission behind a project called Pie It Forward. Sarah Fertig says she is "on a mission to change the world with the power of pie.”

Sarah and her boyfriend Chris Kovac left their homes in Brighton, packed up their 1999 Silverado named Gracie, and, along with their Border Collie co-pilot Shalosh, the pair have been crisscrossing the nation, baking pies and handing out free slices.

Sarah Fertig joined us today to talk about their mission and just how one betters the world with pie.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:19 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Stateside for Monday, July 1st, 2013

Michigan is leading the nation in small business loans. It seems like good news on the surface, but are there economic consequences for so many new start-ups?

And author Keith Taylor stopped by to give us his picks for summer-time reads. His choices might just surprise you.

Also we began a week-long series of stories here on Stateside where we'll hear from immigrants about what America means to them. Today's story came from a young woman who lives at the Salvation Army's Teen Parent Center in Grand Rapids. 

And, we found out how one couple is trying to bring goodness to communities by baking pies.

Also, we welcomed Interlochen Public Radio listeners to Stateside! Listeners from Traverse City to Manistee; Harbor Springs to Ludington, joining in on the conversations and issues that matter to all of us as Michiganders. Together, we'll explore breaking news and better understand policy issues, and we'll discover stories and meet people from every corner of our state.

First on the show, Governor Snyder continues his travels around the state today in southeast Michigan to push for an expansion of Medicaid. Governor Snyder wants to expand the program – using federal funds – to hundreds of thousands of low-income adults.

Snyder has criticized fellow Republicans in the Senate for leaving Lansing for their summer recess without voting on the measure. The state House had already approved the legislation.

Governor Snyder joined us today to discuss the issue.

Stateside
5:18 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

How does job growth in Michigan compare to other states?

Unemployment benefits will run out for millions of Americans this spring if Congress doesn't extend the unemployment insurance program (an unemployment line in California in 2007).
Michael Raphael Flickr

An interview with Daniel Howes.

Economic development leaders in Michigan like to talk about the number of manufacturing jobs created in the state in the last couple of years. But Michigan is not keeping up with the job growth of some other states as the nation recovers from the Great Recession.

It's Thursday, which means we talk to Daniel Howes, business columnist with the Detroit News.

Howes joined us today to discuss Michigan’s anemic job growth.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:14 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Flint uses art to tackle important issues surrounding the city

Andrew Morton is one of the nine artists selected for Flint's master plan.

An interview with Andrew Morton, the artistic director of the Shop Floor Theatre Company in Flint.

The city of Flint is currently working on a master plan to help shape the city’s future in the next 20 years. Part of that plan involves the role of arts.

Recently the National Endowment for the Arts gave a grant to hire nine artists who live in each of the city’s wards to explore the role arts can have in the community and get residents involved in the master plan.

One of those artists, Andrew Morton, is the artistic director of the Shop Floor Theatre Company in Flint, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:12 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Pipe organ festival hits Kalamazoo and Battle Creek

A pipe organ.
Flickr

An interview with Brooks Grantier, secretary of the program committee for Great Lakes Swell Organs.

If you can’t get enough of the soaring sounds of pipe organs, you’re in for a treat.

Starting Sunday and lasting through July 3, organists from five states will be attending and playing in Kalamazoo and Battle Creek for the Great Lakes regional convention of the American guild of organists called the Great Lakes Swell Organs.

Brooks Grantier, secretary of the program committee for the group, joined us today to tell us all about the festival.

For more information, visit http://agokalamazoo.org/

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:02 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, June 27th, 2013

We wrapped up our week-long look at energy in Michigan with a focus on wind. Is it really a viable energy source for our state?

And, we headed to Flint to find out how some residents are helping to shape their community through all different types of art.

Also, if you love the sound of pipe organs, head over to the Great Lakes Swell Organs festival happening in Kalamazoo and Battle Creek this weekend. We spoke with program director Brooks Grantier.

First on the show, economic development leaders in Michigan like to talk about the number of manufacturing jobs created in the state in the last couple of years. But Michigan is not keeping up with the job growth of some other states as the nation recovers from the Great Recession.

It's Thursday, which means we talk to Daniel Howes, a business columnist with the Detroit News.

Howes joined us today to discuss Michigan’s anemic job growth.

Stateside
4:46 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Is wind energy a viable option for Michigan?

DTE expects to build around 50 wind turines in Sanilac and Huron counties. The company is reviewing bids from turbine makers now.
Tim Wang Flickr

An interview with Mark Clevey and Victoria Pebbles.

The potential of wind energy is just beginning to be realized in the U.S.

Some states have been embracing this technology to create electricity, but Michigan has been a little slower to put up as many wind turbines.

Mark Clevey, co-chair at the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative, and Victoria Pebbles, program director with the Great lakes Commission, joined us today.

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Stateside
5:32 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

How the Supreme Court's ruling on same-sex marriage will impact Michigan

Guillaume Paumier/Flickr

An interview with Larry Dubin and Emily Divendorf.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional, meaning same-sex couples who are legally married will be recognized by the federal government. The court also ruled in a case that basically makes same-sex marriage in California legal.

But what does that mean for Michigan?

In 2004 voters approved a state constitutional amendment banning recognition of same-sex marriage or similar union. What’s the future of that amendment? What changes will there be for same-sex couples legally married in another state but living in Michigan?

Larry Dubin, a professor at the University of Detroit Mercy law school and Emily Dievendorf, the managing director of Equality Michigan, joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:27 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Michigan is working towards clean energy, but is still very dependent on coal

DTE's St. Clair Power Plant in East China, Michigan. The plant burns a blend of low-sulfur western coal and high-sulfur eastern coal. Coal-burning power plants are one of the biggest sources of man-made mercury pollution.
user cgord wikimedia commons

An interview with Skiles Boyd and Tiffany Hartung.

There’s a huge disconnect between our use of electricity and the burning of coal. The average American’s use of electricity in a day equals 20 pounds of coal, that’s what you burn on average.

In Michigan, all the coal we use is imported from out of state.

Skiles Boyd, vice president of environmental management and resources at DTE Energy, and Tiffany Hartung with the Sierra Club, organizer for the Moving Beyond Coal campaign, joined us today to discuss our dependence on coal.

Read more
Stateside
5:25 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Who is shopping at the new Whole Foods in Detroit?

The grand opening of the Detroit Whole Foods store.
Facebook

An interview with Kami Pothukuchi and Micki Maynard.

There’s been a lot of buzz about the grocery chain Whole Foods opening a store in Midtown Detroit, maybe too much buzz.

The idea of Whole Foods, the store nicknamed by some as “Whole Paycheck,” being the first store in a city hit hard by poverty seems at best incongruent.

Kami Pothukuchi, associate professor of urban planning at Wayne State University, and Micki Maynard, contributor to Forbes.com and former Detroit reporter for the New York Times, joined us in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
2:28 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

We continued our look at energy in Michigan today with coal. DTE Energy's Skiles Boyd and the Sierra Club's Tiffany Hartung spoke with us about what is being done in Michigan to reduce coal emissions and move towards renewable energy.

Also, the new Whole Foods store in Midtown Detroit has garnered a lot of attention. We talked with Kami Pothukuchi and Micki Maynard about how the store has affected the area.

First on the show, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional, meaning same-sex couples who are legally married will be recognized by the federal government. The court also ruled in a case that basically makes same-sex marriage in California legal.

But what does that mean for Michigan?

In 2004, voters approved a state constitutional amendment banning recognition of same-sex marriage or similar union. What’s the future of that amendment? What changes will there be for same-sex couples legally married in another state but living in Michigan?

Larry Dubin, a professor at the University of Detroit Mercy law school and Emily Dievendorf, the managing director of Equality Michigan, joined us today to discuss the issue.

Stateside
5:43 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Horizontal hydraulic fracturing also controversial in Europe

An interview with BBC business reporter Russell Padmore.

Horizontal hydraulic fracturing has caused a boom in gas drilling in our state and country, but Michigan and the U.S. are certainly not the only places on the planet dealing with fracking. It's starting to be an issue in Europe, as well.

BBC Business reporter Russell Padmore joined us today to talk about how fracking is affecting England, France, Germany, and other countries.  

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:41 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Increased horizontal hydraulic fracturing is causing concerns in Michigan

A natural gas well.
World Resources Institute

An interview with Andy Hoffman and Abrahm Lustgarten.

Right now we have abundant supplies of natural gas because of what the U.S. Energy Information administration calls robust inshore production, there is a glut of natural gas and that means cheaper gas.

This increased supply is mostly due to hydraulic fracturing - more importantly, a newer way to use the drilling method, horizontal hydraulic fracturing. Horizontal fracking has made it easier and cheaper to extract natural gas and oil from shale deposits in the U.S. and around the globe. Horizontal fracking has meant a boom in gas drilling in the U.S. and it's meant more jobs in certain areas of the country. It’s meant less dependence on foreign sources for energy. And because burning natural gas emits about half the CO2 emissions of coal or oil, it means less of the greenhouse gases that are causing climate change. It also means families can heat their homes more cheaply.

But there are also risks and concerns. The extraordinary expansion of natural gas extraction through this use of horizontal hydraulic fracturing is causing some real concerns about risks to air and water quality.

Andy Hoffman, a professor of sustainable enterprise at the University of Michigan, and Abrahm Lustgarten, a reporter for ProPublica, joined us today.

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