Stateside Staff

DeBoer Rowse Adoption Legal Fund

On October 16th,  U.S. District Judge Bernard Friedman will be hearing a case, which challenges Michigan’s Constitutional ban on gay marriage.

The case didn’t start out that way. It started out as a court case to simply protect the futures of these three little kids who really don’t understand such things as government and lawyers and courts. They only know they have a happy home with their two moms.

DeBoer and Rowse wanted to jointly adopt their kids to better protect their futures. The State of Michigan argued, no way. They can’t. They’re not married.

Their case has become the most anticipated development in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people’s rights in Michigan. They’re involved in a Federal court case that challenges the state’s Constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.

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There’s a new report on lobbyists’ spending in Lansing. The Michigan Campaign Finance Network has looked at the numbers, and the big change: free lunches for legislators are up 48% from 2012.

Rich Robinson of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network joined us today to talk about what he’s found.

Listen to the full interview above.

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The co-hosts of It’s Just Politics were hanging out with lots of Republicans this weekend - around 1,500, in case you were wondering. 

Rick Pluta, Capitol Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network and our own political junkie here at Michigan Radio, Zoe Clark joined us today to talk about what they learned at the Mackinac Republican Leadership Conference that took place over the weekend.

Listen to the full interview above.

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Go to New York. Visit a nice restaurant. And, you just might find yourself looking over the wine list and find an entry that might be surprise you. A Michigan wine.

The Chief Restaurant Critic and Wine Writer for Hour Magazine, Chris Cook recently wrote about that surprise, and he joined us today to talk Michigan wines.

Listen to the full interview above.

http://www.commonwealthfund.org/

A brand-new report card has been released from the bipartisan Commonwealth Fund.

The report examines just how well the health care systems in each of the 50 states are working. The conclusion: if you live in a state that generally does poorly in health care, it doesn't necessarily matter what your income level is. High-income people who live in these poorly-performing states are worse off than low-income people who live in states with high health scores.

Cathy Schoen is senior vice president at The Commonwealth Fund and the author of the new report. She spoke with Cyndy Canty, host of Stateside, earlier in the day.

Listen to the full interview above.

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The new fall semester at the University of Michigan is bringing significant change.

Earlier this summer, the U of M Board of Regents said “yes” to offering in-state tuition to undocumented students as long as they meet certain criteria. All military will be allowed to pay in-state tuition, active, reserve, and honorably discharged, as well.

The vote was watched closely by advocates for young people who were brought into this country as undocumented immigrants. On such advocate is Serena Davila. Davila is the Executive Director for Legislative Affairs for the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Cyndy Canty, host of Stateside, spoke with Davila about the change in tuition.

Listen to the full interview above.

Time now for our weekly check-in with Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes. On the front-burner: The mediation talks between Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr and dozens of lawyers representing the city's creditors.

Listen to the full interview above.

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It's been an extra-magical summer in the small southwest Michigan town of Colon.

This summer brought the 77th Annual Abbott's Magic Get-Together put on by the Abbott Magic Company, which has been helping magicians work their wonders since 1934.

Cyndy Canty, host of Stateside, sat down with Greg Bordner, his father co-founded the Abbott Magic Company in January 1934, and asked just how a small Michigan town became, as it likes to say, "The Magic Capitol of the World?"

Listen to the full interview above.

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Usually we do a story when someone decides to run for office. Generally, it's not much news when a possible candidate decides against a run. But, in this case, today it is news. The headline: West Michigan Republican Congressman Justin Amash has decided he will not run for the open U.S. Senate in Michigan in 2014.

As of now, former Michigan Secretary of State Terri Lynn Land is the only declared Republican candidate.

Rick Pluta, Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

More than 1,500 works of art, with more than 160 venues, and 47 countries represented. Those are just a few statistics of this year's ArtPrize in Grand Rapids opening today with some 400,000 expected visitors to the city. Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith was on the scene, and we spoke to her as well as the new Executive Director of ArtPrize.

And, Congressman Justin Amash has decided not to run for U.S. senate. What does this decision mean for the rest of the candidates?

The University of Michigan announced earlier that they will now offer in-state tuition to undocumented students. We talked with Serena Davila, the executive director for Legislative Affairs for the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, about what this means for the students.

Also, how well are health care systems in the U.S. working? A new report by the Commonwealth Fund gave us some answers.

And, the small town of Colon in southwest Michigan has been dubbed the “Magic Capital of the World.” We spoke with one resident to find out why that is.

First on the show, our weekly check-in with Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes. And, on the front-burner? The mediation talks between Detroit's Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr and dozens and dozens of lawyers representing the city's creditors. Howes joined us to tell us more about the mediation.

artprize.org

Today was the opening day for ArtPrize in Grand Rapids. And this year, ArtPrize has a new executive director, Christian Gaines. He was formerly with the American Film Institute and IMDB.com.

Christian Gaines joined us today from Grand Rapids to talk about this new position and what the event means for the city.

Listen to the full interview above.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Alright, Michigan art lovers, it is time.

ArtPrize opened today, and for the next 19 days downtown Grand Rapids will be crammed with art from all over the world, and we the public get to decide which artist is going to win the $200,000 top prize.

This is an art show that Time magazine called one of 5 festive events you won’t want to miss in 2013, and as you might expect, Grand Rapids is buzzing.

Michigan Radio’s West Michigan reporter Lindsey Smith joined us today from Grand Rapids to talk about the show. 

Listen to the full interview above.

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It's the crunch that service groups all over Michigan are facing: funding is shrinking, even as demand for services is rising.

We wanted to see how these budget cuts are hitting service groups. What has the cost been in terms of the help they're able to offer to their community? And what strategies have they come up with to help close that gap?

Barbara Niess-May joined us today. She's the executive director of the SafeHouse Center in Ann Arbor. It's the only place in Washtenaw County that focuses on helping survivors of domestic violence.

Listen to the full interview above.

DIA

For every time Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr declares there are no plans to sell off DIA treasures to satisfy creditors, he also says, "all options are on the table."

Detroit Institute of Arts officials are leaving no stone unturned as they work to protect its collection from the storm of Detroit's bankruptcy.

We wondered, with the art world's attention focused on the DIA, how are other art museums in Michigan faring? And just how are they drawing in visitors in this digital age when most of us can look at priceless art images with just a few clicks of a mouse?

Joining us for this discussion is Bridge Magazine contributing writer Nancy Derringer, whose recent piece in Bridge has the hopeful headline: "Far from Bankrupt: Michigan art museums thrive despite economic woes."

Listen to the full interview above.

Since the Detroit bankruptcy filing, there's been lots of discussion about the works at the Detroit Institute of Art.

Could they be sold?

But, what about the state of the state's other art museums - in say, Flint, East Lansing or Kalamazoo?

On today's show we check in on just how museums across Michigan are faring in the digital age.

And there's a job crunch in Michigan. It can cost business and job growth, but it might not be what you expect -- truck-driver shortages. What it means for the state economy, later in the show.

First, when it comes to trying to wiggle out of paying for auto insurance, the creativity of some Michigan drivers seems to know no bounds. But to all of those drivers who think they're getting away with auto insurance fraud, the Michigan Secretary of State has a warning: "We're on to you."

Secretary of State Ruth Johnson is announcing the creation of a task force to fight fraud in auto insurance all across Michigan.

She joined us today.

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When it comes to trying to wiggle out of paying for auto insurance, the creativity of some Michigan drivers seems to know no bounds.

But to all of those drivers who think they're getting away with auto insurance fraud, the Michigan Secretary of State has a warning: "We're on to you."

Secretary of State Ruth Johnson is announcing the creation of a task force to fight fraud in auto insurance all across Michigan.

Secretary of State Johnson joined us today from Lansing.

Listen to the interview above.

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Detroit and its unique role in the world of design.

That's what organizers are focusing on this week with the Detroit Design Festival.

The five-day festival rolls out on Wednesday with 70 separate events representing nearly 400 artists and designers.

Matt Clayson joined us today.

Listen to the interview above.

It's officially the law of the land.

Governor Rick Snyder signed the Medicaid expansion into law today.

The expansion will provide Medicaid services to hundreds of thousands of working-poor in the state through the federal Affordable Care Act. On today's show, what the expansion means for Michigan and what's next on the Governor's and the Legislature's agenda.

And, Brandon and Bethany Foote, the couple behind the musical group Gifts or Creatures, joined us today to talk about their music.

Also, Rivertown, a $55 million proposed development along the east riverfront in Detroit, recently won approval from the Detroit Economic Development Corporation. How are developments like this possible when Detroit is bankrupt?

First on the show, in Michigan, by state law, the day after Labor Day is Back-To-School Day.

But in some 30 districts and charter schools in Michigan, kids have already been going to school because these districts and schools are experimenting with year-round school.

It's a concept getting much attention with the realization that our traditional school schedule causes most kids to forget some of the reading and math skills over the long summer break. That forces teachers to spend the first month or more re-teaching the previous year's material.

What does year-round school look like and is there a demand for it?

For the answer, we turned to the Crosswell-Lexington Community Schools in rural Sanilac County, which is offering the option of a year-round schedule.

Superintendent Kevin Miller joined us today.

User: Fabienne Kneifel/Flickr

The news of Detroit's bankruptcy filing has been relentless.

But that Chapter 9 filing does not seem to be completely stalling economic growth and development in and around downtown.

Case in point: Rivertown -- a $55 million proposed development along the east riverfront. It recently won approval from the Detroit Economic Development Corporation.

Rivertown would have townhouses, apartments and small-scale retail.

Richard Baron, chairman and CEO of real estate development firm McCormick Baron Salazar, joined us today to talk about the development.

Listen to the full interview above.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

In Michigan, by state law, the day after Labor Day is Back-To-School Day.

But in some 30 districts and charter schools in Michigan, kids have already been going to school because these districts and schools are experimenting with year-round school.

It's a concept getting much attention with the realization that our traditional school schedule causes most kids to forget some of the reading and math skills over the long summer break. That forces teachers to spend the first month or more re-teaching the previous year's material.

What does year-round school look like and is there a demand for it?

For the answer, we turned to the Crosswell-Lexington Community Schools in rural Sanilac County, which is offering the option of a year-round schedule.

Gov. Snyder / Facebook

After months of political wrangling and debate, Governor Snyder has signed the Medicaid expansion into law. The expansion will provide Medicaid services to hundreds of thousands of working-poor in Michigan through the federal Affordable Care Act.

Chris Gautz, Capitol Correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business, and Chad Livengood, Lansing reporter for the Detroit News joined us today to talk about what we can now expect. 

Listen to the full interview above.

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They call themselves "Gifts or Creatures."

That's Brandon and Bethany Foote with the song "Relicts and Ghosts" off of their new album "Yesteryear Western Darkness," their second album out from Earthwork Music.

The Lansing-based couple joined us today in the studio.

To find out more, visit http://www.giftsorcreatures.com/.

Listen to the full interview above.

Confidence in the judicial system in our state has been undermined because funding sources for many judicial campaign ads remain secret, says the State Bar of Michigan.

Bruce Courtade, president of the State Bar of Michigan, discusses "dark money" in Michigan, and why the Bar is claiming Secretary of State Terri Lynn Land made a “bad ruling” back in 2004 on campaign spending. 

Michigan State University

When you think of East Lansing, you probably don’t think about the sounds of Creole Louisiana.

But Etienne Charles might be changing that. A trumpeter from Trinidad, Charles is now an Associate Professor of Jazz Studies at Michigan State University. His latest album, “Creole Soul,” has been described as both “easy to listen to” and “intellectually sound” by The New York Times, blending sounds from the Caribbean, New Orleans and Midwestern R&B.

Despite his rich repertoire of jazz, Charles got a late start to the genre.

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It sounds like the plot of an apocalyptic Hollywood blockbuster:  the poles on the Sun are flipping.

But why is this polar flip happening? And, what does changing polarity mean for us Earthlings? We talk to MLive Meteorologist Mark Torregrossa about the sun's latest flip-flop. 

We're deep into the 2013-2013 college football season. Fans flock to the "hallowed ground" of their team's home stadium, be it The Big House for Wolverines, Spartan Stadium for MSU Fans or, maybe Kelly/Shorts Stadium for you Chips. Or, maybe, your pilgrimage takes you to other states. To Beaver Stadium in Happy Valley or Ohio Stadium or Notre Dame Stadium.

No one can argue the fact that, no matter which metric you use, whether attendance, TV ratings, revenue for the NCAA, money into the coffers of the college or university, college football is huge.

But, Michigan Radio's sports commentator John U. Bacon is deeply worried about the future of college football. He fears it may be losing its soul and, with it, the support of fans and players.

His new book is a deep-dive into the Big Ten during the 2012 college football season. It's called "Fourth and Long: The Fight for the Soul of College Football." Bacon sat down with Stateside host Cynthia Canty and spoke about his new book.

Today on Stateside, the State Bar of Michigan, which represents thousands of lawyers and judges, is calling for an end to secretly funded judicial campaigns ads in Michigan. The Bar says they want campaign expenditures to be disclosed. We' took a look at this so-called dark money coming up on today's show.

We had our regular Thursday check-in with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes. He had depositions and a White House meeting on his radar screen.

And Michigan Radio's Sports Commentator John U. Bacon talked about his latest book exploring Big Ten College Football.

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The push by fast food workers to make more than minimum wage has swept across the nation. It's raised the question: can fast-food restaurants pay their workers more than the $7.40 an hour minimum wage? If they do, will they last? Is it sustainable?

At the fast food restaurant Moo Cluck Moo, the answer is yes.

Moo Cluck Moo serves up burgers, chicken, shakes in Dearborn Heights in Wayne County.  And starting wages at Moo Cluck Moo are $12.00 an hour.

Detroit Bus Co. Facebook page

In the quest to improve life in Michigan's cities, one of the biggest challenges comes down to transportation.

And one of the most problem-plagued, dysfunctional bus systems in the entire state is in the city of Detroit, where using a bus to get from Point A to Point B can become a herculean task.

And for kids, it's an even greater challenge getting them to and from summer enrichment and after-school programs and doing it safely.

But there's a solution to that challenge which launched this summer and which may have lessons that can apply to cities all over Michigan.

It's called the Youth Transit Alliance. It's a pilot program funded by the Skillman Foundation, a public-private partnership between the Detroit Bus Company and area youth groups.

Andy Didorosi, the president and founder of the Detroit Bus Company and Nina Ignaczak, the project editor for Model D's transportation series, joined us today to tell us how it works.

Listen to the full interview above.

Al Jazeera

There is a new "eye" on the news coming out of Detroit and southeast Michigan.

Al Jazeera America was launched August 20 on cable lineups in 48 million American homes. And it has opened 12 bureaus across the nation, including a Detroit bureau.

Bisi Onile-Ere, the correspondent for the new Detroit Bureau, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

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