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Stateside
5:53 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Michigan Supreme Court refuses to rule early on right-to-work

Michigan Supreme Court
photo courtesy of the MI Supreme Court

An interview with Chris Gautz, the Capitol Correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business.

On Friday, the Michigan Supreme Court said it would not make an early ruling on the constitutionality of the state's new right-to-work law. Governor Snyder had asked the high court to decide the issue before the case made its way through lower courts.

The law was passed last December during a very controversial lame-duck legislative session. Under the law, workers cannot be forced to pay union dues or fees as a condition of employment.

Chris Gautz, the Capitol Correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business joined us today to help break it down for us.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:52 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Michigan kid wins lunch at the White House with his pizza pocket recipe

Jacob Hirsch's "picky eater pita pizza pocket" recipe was one of the 54 winners in the Kids' State Dinner 2013 competition.
http://www.letsmove.gov/

An interview with Jacob Hirsch, a winner of the Kids' State Dinner 2013 competition.

If you have ever visited the White House, you know it's an exciting memory you always treasure.

But how many of us can say we not only visited the White House, we were invited to have lunch with the First Lady of the United States?

Jacob Hirsch of Bloomfield Hills is 8 years old. Tomorrow, Jacob will be a guest at a Kid's "State Dinner" hosted by none other than First Lady Michelle Obama. It's actually a healthy lunch, part of the First Lady's "Let's Move" initiative.

Jacob won his invitation by submitting a healthy recipe in a big national competition. And out of more than 13 hundred entries, Jacob's "Picky Eater Pita Pizza Pocket" was one of 54 winners.

Jacob Hirsch joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:51 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Detroit is seeing a rise in 'pop-up' businesses

Coffee and ______ is Angela Foster's latest pop-up business.
Facebook

An interview with Brian Ellison and Angela Foster about pop-up businesses.

It used to be, when you would think of a "pop-up business," you would pretty much think of those Halloween stores that pop-up each September, or the fireworks tents each July, or the Christmas tree and wreath lots that appear each Thanksgiving.

But the pop-up is growing and temporary businesses or exhibitions are gaining traction in cities and towns where the Great Recession left many empty storefronts.

And the pop-up works on so many levels, both for the entrepreneur and the business districts and cities who can see new life being breathed into buildings and areas that have been way too quiet.

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Stateside
5:47 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Dump a ton of trash in Ottawa, pay $100 - Dump a ton of trash in Michigan, pay 21 cents

It is cheaper for Canadian trash haulers to bring their garbage to Michigan than it is to dump it on their side of the border.
Flickr

An interview with Barry Rabe, who teaches public and environmental policy at the University of Michigan.

Michigan is known for its lakes, sparkling rivers, forests, and campgrounds. And for being a great, cheap place to dump your trash, at least if you’re a Canadian waste hauler.

Consider this: It costs $64 to dump a ton of trash in a landfill in Windsor, over $100 in Ottawa, and on the U.S. side of the border, you’d pay $12.99 a ton in Wisconsin.

Here in Michigan? It costs 21 cents per ton.

And that Canadian trucker hauling the trash pays just five dollars to cross at the border.

It’s a small wonder that Michigan has become a mighty attractive destination for Canadian businesses looking to get rid of their trash.

Just why is our state so ‘cheap and easy’ when it comes to Canadian trash?

Barry Rabe teaches public and environmental policy at the University of Michigan at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, and he joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:41 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Detroit's three casinos are showing a decline in revenue

Mike Russell. Wikimedia Commons

An interview with Jake Miklojcik, the President of Michigan Consultants.

As revenue shrank and budget holes grew, the City of Detroit has turned to its three casinos for badly needed tax revenue, as well as jobs.

And at a time when an emergency manager is running the show, and bankruptcy is looming, it is not great news to hear that all three Detroit casinos posted a decline in revenue from May 2012 to May 2013.

Jake Miklojcik is the President of Michigan Consultants. He's an economic analyst, and he joined us today to talk about what’s causing the revenue drop and what can be done about it.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:36 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Stateside for Monday, July 8th, 2013

Canada is dumping its garbage in Michigan. We took a look at why it's so cheap to haul trash over the border and the political reasons making it hard to stop.

And, the rise of the pop-up: Why temporary businesses are springing up and finding success.

And, we spoke with Jacob Hirsch, the boy from Bloomfield Hills who won a trip to the White House to have lunch with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Also, Jake Miklojcik joined us to talk about why Detroit casinos are seeing a drop in revenue.

But first we talked about Friday's decision by the Michigan Supreme Court. The court said it would not make an early ruling on the constitutionality of the state's new right-to-work law. Governor Snyder had asked the high court to decide the issue before the case made its way through lower courts.

The law was passed last December during a very controversial lame-duck legislative session. Under the law, workers cannot be forced to pay union dues or fees as a condition of employment.

Chris Gautz, the capitol correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business, joined us today to help break it down.

Stateside
4:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

The history of 4th of July celebrations

The Parade Company via theparade.org

An interview with author Bill Loomis.

With the 4th of July at hand, it's a good bet many of us have a backyard barbeque in our plans, maybe catching a fireworks show or doing one of your own in your backyard.

That got us thinking about the ways Michiganders have marked the big National Holiday over the centuries, and for that, we turn to our Official Stateside Historian.

Bill Loomis writes for the Detroit News and he's the author of "Detroit's Delectable Past: Two Centuries of Frog Legs, Pigeon Pie and Drugstore Whiskey." He joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

It was dangerous! Explosions, injuries! No, not the war for Independence, but how we used to celebrate it. On today’s show, we went back a hundred years to see how Michiganders used to mark the 4th of July.

And, we spoke with Mardi Jo Link, author of the new book, "Bootstrapper: A Memoir. From Broke to Badass on a Northern Michigan Farm."

And, we looked into what’s behind the increase in backyard chicken farming here in Michigan.

Also, Andy Webb, owner of Captain Boom Fireworks in Otsego, joined us to talk about the new adjustment to the fireworks law.

And, we continued our week-long series of stories from immigrants about what America means to them. Today we talked to Koffi Itito. He fled the small West African nation of Togo in 2004. Now, he helps other refugees through his work at Freedom House in Detroit.

First on the show, to anyone who endured the dark days of the Great Recession with the near-death ordeals of General Motors and Chrysler, it seems nearly impossible to believe the "Help Wanted" sign is out at the car makers and their parts suppliers.

The Center for Automotive Research predicts the auto industry will add 35,000 jobs this year.  One auto supply executive calls it "an employee's market."

We wondered if this is a true hiring spree and if this can been seen as a return to the "glory days" of the car industry, or should we keep our collective guard up for fear of easily sliding back into the dark days of soft sales and layoffs?

David Cole, the Chairman Emeritus of the Center for Automotive Research, joined us today to discuss what’s behind these new jobs.

Stateside
4:44 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

New memoir details the struggles of a single parent living on a farm in northern Michigan

Mardi Jo Link is the author of "Bootstrapper: A Memoir."
Facebook

An interview with author Mardi Jo Link.

One of the best things about sharing each other's stories is how we can learn from each other.

And especially as Michigan has weathered the Great Recession, so many people in our state have had to face challenging periods, times when money was tight when you dreaded finding another past-due notice in the mailbox or phone call from a creditor.

Then factor in the challenges of being a single parent trying to raise a family and stretch a dollar.

That's the story Mardi Jo Link shares in her new book: "Bootstrapper: A Memoir. From Broke to Badass on a Northern Michigan Farm," published by Knopf.

Read more
Stateside
4:41 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

The auto industry is predicted to add 35,000 jobs in 2013

automotiveauto.info

An interview with David Cole, the Chairman Emeritus of the Center for Automotive Research.

To anyone who endured the dark days of the Great Recession with the near-death ordeals of General Motors and Chrysler, it seems nearly impossible to believe the "Help Wanted" sign is out at the car makers and their parts suppliers.

The Center for Automotive Research predicts the auto industry will add 35,000 jobs in 2013. One auto supply executive calls it "an employee's market."

We wondered if this is a true hiring spree and if this can been seen as a return to the "glory days" of the car industry, or should we keep our collective guard up for fear of easily sliding back into the dark days of soft sales and layoffs?

David Cole, the Chairman Emeritus of the Center for Automotive Research, joined us today to discuss what’s behind these new jobs and whether or not these good times will last.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:41 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Backyard chicken farms are on the rise in Michigan

Raising chickens in urban areas is becoming more and more common.
Flickr

An interview with Taylor Reid, the founder of beginningfarmers.org and PhD candidate in Community, Food and Agriculture at Michigan State University.

Cynthia Canty's good friend Susan and her husband are about to move from a townhouse in an Oakland County suburb to a small cottage on about an acre in another Oakland County town. One of her top priorities is to start keeping chickens in her new backyard.

Seems she is not alone. Backyard chicken-raising is on the rise across the state and across the country.

There are now ordinances allowing people to also keep chickens in Ann Arbor, Flint, Detroit, Lansing, Grand Rapids, Traverse City and many other Michigan communities.

Taylor Reid is the founder of beginningfarmers.org and he's a PhD candidate in Community, Food and Agriculture at Michigan State University. He joined us today to talk about why urban chicken raising is on the rise and what the concerns are about this practice.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:40 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Noise complaints led to prohibiting late-night fireworks in Michigan

Sarah Cwiek Michigan Radio

An interview with Andy Webb, owner of Captain Boom Fireworks in Otsego.

You don't have to look at the calendar to know the 4th of July is at hand. Just open your window and chances are you'll hear folks all over Michigan take advantage of the 2012 fireworks law, the one that allowed larger and louder fireworks to be sold and launched.

But the second year of the new state law may find things a little quieter. A raft of complaints prompted lawmakers to tweak the fireworks law, allowing local governments to ban overnight use of consumer grade fireworks on and around holidays.

Andy Webb, owner of Captain Boom Fireworks in Otsego, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:12 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Why do most people distrust their elected leaders?

Charles Ballard
MSU

An interview with Charley Ballard and Tom Ivacko.

When you think about the government – local, state, or federal - how much do you trust those leaders whom you've elected?

We certainly know that public approval ratings for Congress are at abysmally low levels. The latest Gallup poll finds 78% of U.S. voters disapprove of the job Congress is doing; only 17% approve.

Let's look more closely at what we all think about our leaders. And for that, we've raised that special 50-50 flag, that's half Wolverine maize and blue and half Spartan green and white. Charley Ballard, who directs the State of the State Survey for Michigan State University, and Tom Ivacko, who does the Michigan Public Policy surveys for the University of Michigan's Center for Local, State and Urban Policy, both joined us in the studio today.

Read more
Stateside
4:56 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

How students are reacting to the raise in tuition and interest rates in Michigan

Darrin Camilleri is the acting President of the Michigan Federation of College Democrats.
LinkedIn

College students in Michigan got some unwelcome news over the past week: tuition is going up at many universities and colleges, and interest rates on some of their loans will double.

This one-two punch of soaring costs and rising debt is being felt in many homes around Michigan.

There are more than 300,000 students in Michigan with federal loans. And the number of people taking out student loans and the amount they borrow continues to climb.

We wanted to get behind these headlines and look at just what this means to a typical college student in our state.

Read more
Stateside
4:55 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

New language on 2014 ballot could get wolf hunting banned in Michigan if passed

Michigan's gray wolf population is estimated to be 687 animals. The recovery goal for the population is between 250-300 wolves.
Tracy Brooks/Mission Wolf/USFWS

An interview with Rick Pluta.

The group Keep Michigan Wolves Protected has filed language with the Secretary of State to put another petition on the 2014 ballot. The group wants to ban wolf hunting in Michigan.

If the language is approved, the group will try and collect more than 160 thousand signatures to put the question to voters.

Rick Pluta, the Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network joined us today to discuss what this new ballot will do.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:43 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Census data show men catching up to women in number and longevity

Flickr

An interview with Kurt Metzger, the director of Data Driven Detroit.

Women of Michigan, something's going on.

Somehow, the "men's team" is gaining ground on the "women's team." Census results show a surprising trend: the state's male population is growing... and men are living longer.

Our go-to guy when it comes to crunching Census data is Kurt Metzger. He's the director of Data Driven Detroit and he joined us today to discuss the new statistics.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:41 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

Do you trust your government? What about your government? Do your elected leaders trust you?

Disapproval rates of Congress are at all-time lows - gridlock, and indecision. Can we change the dynamic, and what does it mean going forward?

And census results show a surprising trend: the state's male population is growing. We took a look at what's behind the numbers.

Also we spoke with Michael Narlock, head of Astronomy at the Cranbrook Institute of Science, about the best places to go in Michigan for stargazing this summer.

And Darrin Camilleri, President of the Michigan Federation of College Democrats, joined us to talk about increasing tuition and raised interested rates for student loans.

Also we continued our week-long series of stories from immigrants about what America means to them.

Today we heard from Linda Steinke, whose family came to the U.S. from Iran in the 1970s when her father had the opportunity to work in the auto industry.

First on the show, the group Keep Michigan Wolves Protected has filed language with the Secretary of State to put another petition on the 2014 ballot. The group wants to ban wolf hunting in Michigan.

If the language is approved, the group will try and collect more than 160 thousand signatures to put the question to voters.

Rick Pluta, the Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network joined us today.

Stateside
4:33 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Where to go and what to look for if you're stargazing this summer

User: seriousfun MorgueFile.com

An interview with Michael Narlock, the head of Astronomy at the Cranbrook Institute of Science.

For centuries and centuries, we’ve been fascinated by the night sky. As we relax into the summer months we figured we’d spend a little time taking a look at what we’ll see when we look up at the night sky here in Michigan.

Michael Narlock is the head of Astronomy at the Cranbrook Institute of Science, and he joined us today with tips and strategies for summer stargazing.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:32 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Governor Snyder continues to push for Medicaid expansion

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is pushing the state Senate to vote on Medicaid expansion.
Gov. Snyder Facebook

An interview with Governor Rick Snyder.

Governor Rick Snyder is continuing his travels around the state today in southeast Michigan to push for an expansion of Medicaid. Gov. Snyder wants to expand the program – using federal funds – to hundreds of thousands of low-income adults.

Snyder has criticized fellow Republicans in the Senate for leaving Lansing for their summer recess without voting on the measure. The state House had already approved the legislation.

Governor Snyder joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:27 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

What books should you consider reading this summer?

Flickr/Sarah Sosiak

An interview with writer and poet Keith Taylor.

Now that summer has truly taken us into her embrace, we’ve been thinking of some of our favorite summer pleasures. And it was fairly unanimous: one of the sweetest times of summer is lounging around in the sun, maybe on a beach, maybe your favorite spot on your back porch or yard, and in your hands is a good book.

Keith Taylor coordinates the undergraduate program in creative writing at the University of Michigan, he is a poet and a writer, and he is simply the best at uncovering hidden gems for us to read and enjoy.

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