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Stateside
5:29 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

The line between innovation, technology, and moral standards

Dr. Cynthia Finelli
engin.umich.edu

An interview with Dr. Cynthia Finelli.

Engineering and technology touch our lives every minute of every day. As we move into this 21st Century, technology is progressing at rates that are faster than most anyone could have imagined.

But as engineers design this new technology, what's happening at the intersection of "technology" and "ethics?” And what's the price we pay when engineers overlook that "moral compass?"

These are questions Dr. Cynthia Finelli is focused on as she helps train the engineers of the future.

Dr. Cynthia Finelli is the director of the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching in Engineering and she's a research associate professor at the University of Michigan.

And she's part of a team called E3, which stands for "Exploring Ethical Decision-Making in Engineering," a group of engineering teachers from many colleges and universities. These teachers study engineering ethics.

Dr. Cynthia Finelli joined us in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:12 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Baby boomers hold the 'key to success' for automakers

Analysts say car sales are climbing.
Lester Graham Michigan Radio

An interview with John Wolkonowicz, an independent auto analyst.

When you look at much of popular media these days, it often feels as though the advertisers of America are eyeing that young audience. If you're over 55, you could certainly be forgiven for getting the idea that advertisers and agencies don't much care what you want to buy.

Well, a new study by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute proves that, at least when it comes to buying cars, it's those often overlooked, sometimes-invisible over 55's who are doing much of the buying.

The study found the 55-to-64 year old baby-boomers are 15 times more likely to buy a new car or truck than the 18-to-24 year olds.

John Wolkonowicz, an independent auto analyst, joined us from Boston today to talk more about why baby boomers seem to hold the key to success for automakers.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:59 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, June 12th, 2013

On today's show, we found out why baby boomers seem to be key for the auto industry.

And, the author of the new book, "The Great American Jet Pack: The Quest for the Ultimate Individual Lift Device" joined us to take a look at the history of individual flight.

Also, we took a look into the ethics of technology and engineering with the help of Dr. Cynthia Finelli.

First on the show, one of the cities that has been in the headlines of late is Hamtramck.

Governor Snyder has declared that the 2.1 square mile city within Detroit is under a financial emergency and could come under the control of a state-appointed emergency manager.

But facing tough financial times is nothing new for Hamtramck. And, starting from its beginning as a home for Polish immigrants, the city continues to be one of the most diverse communities in the state.

We wanted to find out more about the unique history of Hamtramck, so we turn to someone who was born in Hamtramck. His family’s roots in the city go back to when his grandfather first arrived.

Greg Kowalski is chairman of the Hamtramck Historical Commission and he joined us today in the studio.

Stateside
5:09 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Growing concerns over the impact of Detroit pet coke piles

Sarah Cwiek Michigan Radio

An interview with Professor Nick Schroeck.

That huge pile of petroleum coke lying alongside the Detroit River is triggering a growing sense of alarm. 

You may recall, we spoke with New York Times journalist Ian Austen about the origins of this mountain of "pet coke" that's growing in Southwest Detroit. It's a byproduct of tar sands oil refining used in energy production. When mixed with coal, it can be used as a low-cost fuel.

The piles are being brought in by trucks from the Marathon Petroleum Refinery in southwest Detroit, and the pet coke is being stored by a company called Detroit Bulk Storage for the owner of the pet coke: Koch Carbon.

U.S. Congressmen John Conyers and Gary Peters and others have been voicing concern about the health and environmental risks of storing these piles of pet coke. We wanted to take a closer look at these concerns.

Nick Schroeck is a professor of law at Wayne State University in Detroit and the executive director of the Great Lakes Environmental Law Center, and he joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:08 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Bicycle businesses are booming in Michigan

Staff members of AutoBike, Inc.
evolvethebike.com

An interview with the founder and CEO of AutoBike, Sean Simpson.

As we talked about before on Stateside, there's more to the increased interest in cycling than a great hobby or way to keep fit or compete.

In addition to impacting the look of communities and the infrastructure of the state, there is also a business payoff in all of this.

Michigan is seeing a rise in cycling-related businesses.

One of those is AutoBike, located in Troy, in Oakland County. The founder and CEO of AutoBike is former General Motors engineer Sean Simpson. Sean joined us in the studio today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:07 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Detroit suffers from an 'addiction to debt' according to Kevyn Orr

Not everyone was able to make it into the meeting
Jeff Wattrick Deadline Detroit

An interview with Detroit Free Press Columnist Rochelle Riley.

The city of Detroit is “technically insolvent” and suffers from an “addiction to debt.” That’s according to Detroit's Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr, who described the city’s situation at his first public meeting last night.

About 350 people were on-hand at the start of the meeting, about 250 made it into the meeting but about 100 were left out because of over-crowding.

Detroit Free Press Columnist Rochelle Riley covered the meeting, and she joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:05 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr held his first public meeting yesterday evening. We found out what Orr had to say and what city residents thought about his message.

And, after months and months of hearing about record-low water levels in the Great Lakes, new predictions now show levels could climb some 2 feet over the summer. We spoke with Al Steinman, the Director of the Annis Water Resources Institute at Grand Valley State University to get the details.

Also, the CEO of AutoBike, Inc. joined us today to talk about how bicycle businesses have benefited from the growing interest in cycling.

First on the show, that huge pile of petroleum coke lying alongside the Detroit River is triggering a growing sense of alarm. 

You may recall, we spoke with New York Times journalist Ian Austen here on Stateside about the origins of this mountain of "pet coke" that's growing in Southwest Detroit. It's a byproduct of tar sands oil refining used in energy production. When mixed with coal, it can be used as a low-cost fuel.

The piles are being brought-in by trucks  from the Marathon Petroleum Refinery in southwest Detroit, and the pet coke is being stored by a company called Detroit Bulk Storage for the OWNER of the pet coke: Koch Carbon.

US Congressmen John Conyers and Gary Peters and others have been voicing concern about the health and environmental risks of storing these piles of pet coke.

Nick Shroke is a professor of law at Wayne State University in Detroit and the executive director of the Great Lakes Environmental Law Center, and he joined us today to discuss the issue.

Stateside
3:28 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Great Lakes are rising, according to one study

Great Lakes water levels are rising
NASA Goddard Photo and Video Flickr

There are new reports that expect Lake Michigan and Lake Huron to climb nearly two feet this summer.

One comes from the Army Corps of Engineers, which projects lake levels to rise by 20 inches. 

Al Steinman is the Director of the Annis Water Resources Institute at Grand Valley State University. 

Steinman attributed much of the rising water levels to significant rain this spring. 

"We've risen eight inches since April."

Read more
Stateside
6:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Morgage relief money becomes demolition dollars

flickr user Detroit1701 flickr.com

An interview with Congressman Dan Kildee.

Michigan will get $100 million from the federal government to tear down thousands of vacant houses and clean up struggling neighborhoods.

The money will be used in Detroit, Flint, Grand Rapids, Pontiac and Saginaw.

Democratic Congressman Dan Kildee represents Flint and he’s been pushing hard for this funding. He joined us today to discuss exactly how this money would be used.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
6:10 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

The automotive state is changing to accomodate bicycling

user kconnors morgueFile

An interview with John Lindenmayer, the advocacy and policy director for the League of Michigan Bicyclists.

Whether it’s commuters who are sick of rising gas prices, the hipsters moving into urban areas, or empty-nester baby boomers seeking fitness, the bicycle is growing in popularity. Cycling tripled nationwide from 1990 to 2009, and that growing popularity is reflected here in Michigan.

But it's not just riding for fun or fitness. Cycling can impact the way our communities look, and impact policy and infrastructure at the state and local level, as well.

John Lindenmayer, the advocacy and policy director for the League of Michigan Bicyclists, joined us in the studio. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
6:09 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Michigan filmmakers breathe new life into small-town music venue

Harmony Hill
theharmonyhill.com

An interview with Johannah Scarlet, Ray Moran and Aaron Mohr about their upcoming music festival.

It was 2007 when then-Governor Jennifer Granholm launched Michigan's film incentive program.  It led to a burst of big-league movie makers coming here, making films like Ides of March, Real Steel, Red Dawn and OZ-The Great and Powerful. And that led to a growing group of Michigan workers building careers in the film industry, from casting to grips, assistant directing, extras, actors and more.

But Governor Rick Snyder made good on his promise to cap those film incentives, believing they were not a good investment of state dollars. And as many of the movie-makers pulled up stakes, the Michigan workers were forced to either follow them out of state or build new careers here.

Johannah Scarlet, Ray Moran and Aaron Mohr chose to search for a new opportunity and stay in Michigan. They have now switched gears from making movies to hosting live music events in the tiny village of Farwell in Clare County. Their new music venue is called Harmony Hill, and coming up this Saturday there will be a big outdoor music festival called "Oh Hill Yeah," featuring Michigan bands such as Frontier Ruckus.

Read more
Stateside
6:06 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Undocumented immigrant activist inflitrates Michigan jail

Claudia Munoz detained in the Calhoun County jail
dreamactivist.org

An interview with Claudia Munoz of the National Immigrant Youth Alliance.

It is extremely rare to have someone actually seek out a situation that would end with an arrest and a trip to jail.

But Claudia Munoz did exactly that. She got herself seized as an undocumented immigrant at the Ambassador Bridge in order to see first-hand what things are like at the immigration detention center in Calhoun County near Battle Creek.

Claudia is part of the National Immigrant Youth Alliance, an activist group based in Washington. Their mission is to highlight immigration cases and pressure authorities to take a fresh look at their detention and deportation practices.

Claudia Munoz joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
6:04 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Stateside for Monday, June 10th, 2013

It's not often that people actively seek out a situation that ends up putting them in jail, but on today's show, we spoke with one woman who did exactly that in order to put a spotlight on undocumented immigrants.

And, communities all across the state are spending money to become more bike-friendly. We found out why they think this will help reverse Michigan's brain-drain.

Also, three Michigan filmmakers switched gears from movies to music, and this weekend they are hosting a big outdoor music festival in Clare County.  

First on the show, Michigan will get $100 million from the federal government to tear down thousands of vacant houses and clean up struggling neighborhoods.

The money will be used in Detroit, Flint, Grand Rapids, Pontiac and Saginaw.

Democratic Congressman Dan Kildee has been pushing hard for this funding. He joined us today from Flint.

Stateside
5:31 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Harry Potter fans flock to Michigan quidditch match this weekend

The University of Michigan quidditch team
Facebook

An interview with former quidditch player Krystina Packard.

Brooms up! This weekend in Genesee County there will be a big exhibition match of quidditch. Yes, that's the sport played by the witches and wizards of the Harry Potter novels.

Since true witches and wizards are in fairly short supply around these parts, this will be Muggle Quidditch, “muggle” being the name applied to all of us non-magical types.

College players from the University of Michigan, Michigan State, Eastern, Miami of Ohio and more will be playing the game at the Deer Run Soccer Complex in Linden Township.

Krystina Packard, a former quidditch player with Michigan State, joined us in the studio to tell us how a game that was created in the imaginative mind of author J.K. Rowling has become a surprisingly serious sport for these muggles.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:24 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

John Dingell becomes the longest-serving member of Congress

user Tqycolumbia Wikimedia Commons

An interview with John Dingell.

A piece of history is being written in the United States Congress.

Tomorrow is the day that John Dingell becomes the longest-serving member of Congress ever, surpassing the late Robert Byrd of West Virginia.

He began representing the people of southeast Michigan on December 13, 1955. And 57-and-a-half years later, he is still there.

He joined us today to talk about his experiences.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:23 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

The intergenerational 'Legacies Project' shares stories you'll want to hear

Jimmy Rhoades is one of the cofounders of The Legacies Project
LinkedIn

When Jimmy Rhoades was 26-years-old, his father was diagnosed with cancer. Rhoades was told he would have between six months and a year left with his dad. He went home, and really got to know his father.

"I found out more about his biography in the last six months of his life than in the previous 26 years," Rhoades said.

With the loss of another family member after his father passed away, Rhoades realized the therapeutic value in having your story heard. 

Read more
Stateside
5:21 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Shakespeare in the Arb kicks off its 13th season

Shakespeare in the Arb performs Much Ado About Nothing
Facebook

An interview with Katherine Mendeloff, a lecturer in the Drama Department of the Residential College.

It’s time to "Brush Up Your Shakespeare" as the Cole Porter song goes. And, while you're brushing up on your Shakespeare, you can get in touch with Mother Nature.

It's pretty common to find outdoor summer productions of Shakespeare. But for 13 years Shakespeare in the Arb has been staging the bard's plays outdoors in a different way.

Shakespeare in the Arb is kicking off its 13th season with "Much Ado About Nothing." It's presented by the University of Michigan Matthei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum, and the U of M Residential College.

Katherine Mendeloff, a lecturer in the Drama Department of the Residential College, joined us in the studio today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:20 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Detroit faces a 'Day of Reckoning'

Inside the Detroit Institute of Arts
Maia C/Flickr

An interview with Daniel Howes.

It's Thursday, which means it’s time for our weekly check-in with Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes.

This week, it seems the topic is the fact that the proverbial "Day of Reckoning" is at hand when it comes to the City of Detroit. Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr is trying to work out settlements with the city's creditors, and the treasures at the Detroit Institute of Arts could be at risk.

He joined us in the studio today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:19 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, June 6th, 2013

He's worked with 11 presidents, taken several thousand votes, and tomorrow, Michigan Congressman John Dingell becomes the longest serving member of Congress ever. We spoke with Dingell about his 57 years in D.C.

And, Shakespeare in the Arb is starting its 13th season with “Much Ado About Nothing.” Katherine Mendeloff, a lecturer in the Drama Department of the Residential College, spoke with us about the upcoming performances.

And, this weekend, Harry Potter fans are gathering in Michigan to watch college quidditch teams compete. Former player Krystina Packard joined us in the studio.

Also, a new project launched in Ann Arbor is working to bring together high school students and senior citizens to make history come alive. We spoke with the project’s co-founder and one of the participating teachers about how this has impacted students.

First on the show, it's time for our weekly check-in with Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes.

This week, it seems the topic is the fact that the proverbial "Day of Reckoning" is at hand when it comes to the City of Detroit. Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr is trying to work out settlements with the city's creditors, and the treasures at the Detroit Institute of Arts could be at risk.

He joined us in the studio today to discuss the issue.

Stateside
5:18 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Terri Lynn Land joins the race for US Senate

Michigan Republican Party Facebook

Election 2014 is coming up, and the U.S. Senate seat will be open as Democratic Senator Carl Levin retires.

Michigan Congressman Gary Peters announced last month that he will run for the Democratic nomination, but there appeared to be some hesitation on the part of Republicans.

That is, until this week, when former Michigan Secretary of State Terri Lynn Land announced she will run as a Republican in the race.

Terri Lynn Land joined us in the studio today.

Listen to the full interview above.

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