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Stateside
5:14 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Talking with Congressman, and now Senate candidate, Gary Peters

Gary Peters in his Washington D.C. office. He's hoping to move next door, to the Senate, in 2014.
Gary Peters Facebook

It's been nearly two months since U.S. Senator Carl Levin (D-MI) announced he would not seek a seventh term.

That announcement sets up one of the biggest political questions in Michigan: who will take over his seat in 2014?

Last week , three-time Congressman Gary Peters announced he will run for Levin's seat. Democrats say Peters gives them a strong candidate.

Republicans say the Congressman has supported left-leaning policies that have become unpopular in Michigan.

Congressman, and now Senate candidate, Gary Peters joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:14 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Michigan moving closer to drug testing welfare recipients

Drug test.
user publik15 Flickr

We've been following a bill that's now working its way through the State Legislature.

The House has already said "yes" and passed it. Now it's on to the Senate.

In short: the legislation would require people getting welfare to pass a drug test in order to receive benefits.

The substance abuse screening would be required if there's "reasonable suspicion" that the person is using illegal drugs.

Representative Jeff Farrington (R-Utica) sponsored the bill in the House saying the government should not pay for people's drug habits.

"People are tired of applicants getting welfare payments when they're using them for illegal drug use," said Farrington. "We want to make sure that they get on the right track, they receive their treatment going forward and they get on the right path to success."

Supporters of the bill say only people who test positive would have to pay for the cost of the drug test.

Critics say suspicion-based drug testing demonizes the poor and unfairly hurts children of addicts.

Melissa Smith is a senior policy analyst with the Michigan League for Human Services. She researched the effectiveness of these welfare drug testing programs and she joins us now from Lansing.

She analyzed how "suspicion-based drug testing" is working in other states and shares what she found with us.

What she found?

A lot of money is wasted on these programs and not a lot is accomplished.

Listen to the full-interview above.

Stateside
5:14 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Why we should talk about 'rape culture' on college campuses

College campuses educate students about sexual assault
User: t3rmin4t0r/Flickr

An interview with Jess Klein.

  When parents send their daughters off to college, they do so with their fingers tightly crossed that they will remain safe and sound.

As young women living on their own, a myriad of situations present themselves that could put women in dangerous situations, like walking home late at night and college parties.

Statistics from the Centers for Disease  Control (CDC) support parents' worries.

One in five women report having been raped at some point in their life - the figure is one in 71 for men.

So, what can be done to stop this?

Read more
Stateside
5:11 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra plays Carnegie Hall

Maestro Leonard Slatkin conducting the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.
Leonard Slatkin

It’s been 17 years since the Detroit Symphony Orchestra has graced the stage of one of the most famous concert halls in the world - Carnegie Hall.

So it was big news for Michigan’s cultural scene when the DSO became one of the symphony orchestras chosen for the 2013 "Spring for Music." It's one week, five orchestras, and six concerts at Carnegie Hall.
 
The DSO will perform two separate programs - one on May 9th, the second on May 10th.
 
The music director of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Maestro Leonard Slatkin, joined us from New York City today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:11 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Who will the Republicans put up for U.S. Senate?

U.S. Senator Carl Levin (D-MI) is not running for a seventh term.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

  Who might be the Republicans' best hope of winning Michigan's Senate seat?

Republican strategist Dennis Lennox joined us today.

We asked him why a Republican hasn't jumped into the race yet and who their ideal candidate might be.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:10 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

Stateside for Monday, May 6th, 2013

  Detroit automakers stand to lose a stunning $4 billion dollars in Europe this year. On today's show: we'll take a look at how the financial mess in Europe is effecting the domestic automakers. And, then, singer/song-writer Matt Jones stops by the studio to talk about his newest work and overcoming a challenging -year.

And colleges are holding commencement ceremonies right about now.  

What will all those graduates do with their shiny new degrees?

Based on recent surveys something like half of the graduates from our state hit the road seeking greener pastures in other states within a year of graduating. It's the Michigan "Brain Drain."

One state lawmaker wants to help stem the brain drain by offering tax credits on their student loan payments to college grads who stay in Michigan.

Could tax credits help stem the brain drain?  Or is it a band-aid that masks a deeper challenge for college graduates in Michigan?

State Representative Andy Schor joined us today. He's a freshman Democrat from Lansing and the sponsor of House Bill 4182.

Read more
Stateside
5:04 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

A freshman Representative's bill could fix Michigan's 'Brain Drain'

Andy Schor's Michigan "Brain Drain" Bill was heard in committee last Wednesday
Michigan House Democrats

 As new grads drift out of Ann Arbor after last weekend's commencement, where will they go?

Degrees in hand, they're on the job search - which doesn't mean they're staying in Michigan.

State Representative Andy Schor, D-Lansing, is the sponsor of House Bill 4182, which would provide tax credits to college graduates of public or private four-year colleges and universities in Michigan.

Read more
Politics & Government
5:04 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

Why are Detroit automakers losing out in Europe?

GM's headquarters in Detroit.
Carlos Lowry Flickr

  If you hear the word Europe, you might find yourself thinking of great places to travel, a rich history, or family roots.

If you're an auto executive and you hear “Europe,” you’ll likely sigh and take a couple of aspirin for your headache.

That's because the Detroit automakers stand to lose $4 billion in Europe this year. And with a collapse in auto sales across the pond, trying to muscle through the kinds of changes that saved the industry here in North America is a totally different challenge in Europe.

Michelle Krebs of Edmunds.com and Michigan Radio’s auto reporter Tracy Samilton discuss the bleak picture in Europe for Detroit automakers.

Listen to the full interview above.

Culture
5:03 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

'The People's Campaign' offers a helping hand

  In rural America of the 1800s, it was common for neighbors to pull together to help each other. Harvest time - barn-raisings - there was a sense of "you help me, I help you."

It's that old-fashioned image of the community barn-raising that comes to mind when you hear about The People's Campaign which launched over the weekend on Detroit's East Side.

The People's Campaign is headed-up by Sharlonda Buckman who is the executive director of the Detroit Parent Network.

She joined us to tell us more.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
3:20 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

Ypsilanti's Matt Jones finds salvation in his music

Matt Jones performing with Misty Lyn Bergeron at Michigan Radio.
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

His name is Matt Jones. He's 35 and he's based in Ypsilanti. He's been writing songs and performing around Michigan for the past 15 years. He has growing audience of fans and has received more critical acclaim.

And his story is one of overcoming personal demons and finding salvation in the thing he loves best: making music.

Matt joined us in the studio today to talk about his music.

Matt Jones on Stateside.

Click the link above to hear Cyndy's conversation with Matt.

Matt also performed for our "Songs from Studio East" series. You can check out that performance here:

You can check out more of Matt's music here: http://mattjones.bandcamp.com/

Politics & Culture
6:11 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

  On today's show, we explore the bureaucratic hurdles of the international adoption system, and how it's keeping children trapped in orphanages around the world.

Then we switch gears and discover whether our state symbol, the wolverine, ever lived here.

And Michigan Democratic Congressman Gary Peters has made it official: he will run for the U.S. Senate seat opening up with the retirement of Carl Levin.

The three-term congressman is from Bloomfield Township in Oakland County, an area important to winning a statewide race.

 The GOP has yet to announce who might run for that up-for-grabs Senate seat.

And we turn to the situation in the city of Ecorse. Officials say the financial emergency in the city has been resolved.
 
Ecorse has been under the control of an emergency manager since 2009 – when then-Governor Jennifer Granholm made the appointment.
 
Now, word comes that the city’s budget is balanced and a $20 million deficit has been eliminated.
 
But the announcement doesn't mean elected officials are getting their authority back right away. That’s because Joyce Parker – Ecorse's former emergency manager - has given the city a two-year budget that it must follow.
 
Parker – who we should note is also the emergency manager of Allen Park– joined us today.

Read more
Politics & Government
6:05 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

With 'financial emergency' over in Ecorse, Joyce Parker still watching

Joyce Parker

  State officials say the financial emergency in the city of Ecorse has been resolved.
 
The city has been under the control of an emergency manager since 2009 – when then-Governor Jennifer Granholm made the appointment.
 
Now, word comes that the city’s budget is balanced and a $20 million deficit has been eliminated.
 
But the announcement doesn't mean elected officials are getting their authority back right away. That’s because Joyce Parker – Ecorse's former emergency manager - has given the city a two-year budget that it must follow.
 
Parker – who we should note is also the emergency manager of Allen Park– joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Environment & Science
6:03 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

'The Wolverine State' without any wolverines

A wolverine.
Jeff Ford

We've got the nickname "The Wolverine State," and of course, the University of Michigan and the Wolverines are forever linked.

But the wolverine never called Michigan home.

The wolverine population in the United States is anything but big. An estimated 250-300 wolverines live in the lower 48 states.

One of the experts who devotes herself to protecting the wolverine is, in fact, a "Wolverine."

Bridget Fahey is a 1997 graduate of U-M's School of Natural Resources and Environment.

These days, Fahey is the Endangered Species Chief with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the mountain prairie region.

She joined us today to talk about wolverines.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
6:02 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

The film on international adoption, 'Stuck,' shows in Livonia tonight

A family from Denver says their adopted son was 'unstuck almost 2 years ago from Ethiopia.'

There's a special  screening tonight at the AMC Livonia 20 of the documentary "Stuck." It was an Audience Choice Winner at the Heartland Film Festival.

The film focuses on the process of international adoption and the  children and prospective parents who get "Stuck" in that process.

"Stuck" tells the story of four children and the families who want to adopt them following the children and families as they try to negotiate the bureaucratic ins and outs of the international adoption system.

Film producer Craig Juntunen joined us today along with Kendra Pinkelman. Pinkelman and her husband are trying to adopt a boy from Russia.

That adoption process came to a grinding halt when Russia banned U.S. adoptions last December.

And the Director of the Eastern Michigan Office of Adoption Associates, one of Michigan's leading agencies for international and domestic adoptions, Paula Springer also joined us. She has worked in the adoption field for some 30 years.

Listen to the full discussion above.

Stateside
3:06 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

U-M students link Michigan to Brazil through music

Kids at the Nazare orphange in Pocone, Brazil.
Pantanal Center for Education and Research

Ethan Shirley and Alex Carney both hail from the University of Michigan and are co founders of the Pantanal Music Exchange.

Shirley founded the Pantanal Center for Education and Research is a non profit organization that focuses on science, technology and sustainable community development.

Last summer, Shirley and Carney were setting up some science and technology workshops at the Nazaré orphanage in rural Brazil when the director of the orphanage mentioned in passing that there was a room full of unused instruments.

Read more
Politics & Culture
4:59 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Lots of attention gets paid to helping students navigate what comes after their formal education, but on today's show we talked to one columnist who wonders if we're doing a disservice to our kids by steering them into today's jobs - jobs that might not be available in the future.

And, engineering students at the University of Michigan get real-world experience by designing apps and video games that help autistic children.

Also, we talk with an Ann Arbor musician who was inspired by poetry and art. And we talk about how to improve voter turnout in elections.

First up, we talk with U.S. Rep. Gary Peters (D-MI 14) about easing trade restrictions with foreign nations.

On the surface, it sounds like easing trade restrictions could present new opportunities and more business for American companies such as the Detroit Three automakers, but Peters is speaking out about his deep concerns about ongoing negotiations on a new multi-lateral trade agreement.

It's called the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Congressman Peters believes letting Japan into the "Trans-Pacific Partnership" is courting real danger for U.S. auto companies.

Politics & Government
4:59 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Is the TPP a threat to U.S. auto makers?

The Detroit Three auto companies could be threatened if Japan joins the TPP
wikimedia commons

On the surface, it sounds like easing trade restrictions with foreign nations could present new opportunities and more business for American companies like the Detroit Three automakers.

But, is there a deeper danger to American jobs in these overseas trade agreements?

Michigan Democratic Congressman Gary Peters voiced his concerns about a new multi-lateral trade agreement known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Read more
Stateside
4:56 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Are we making a mistake by educating students for today's jobs?

Nursing is a hot profession today, but will it be in the future?
Kate Davidson Changing Gears

Here's a question to consider: are we doing the students of Michigan a disservice by steering them to the jobs that businesses are demanding in today's world?

It's certainly a big push for Governor Rick Snyder.

But MLive columnist Rick Haglund has some misgivings about this growing push to match courses with what businesses want in Michigan grads.

He joined us today from Birmingham, and we asked him why he thinks this approach could backfire in the long run.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:55 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

These aren't your normal video games

University of Michigan students design video games for people with disabilities
user Honey Bunny Flickr

Do your kids spend too much time with video games? Well, they might keep it up in college.

In Dr. David Chesney's engineering courses,  students at the University of Michigan create video games and apps for the greater good.

Dr. Chesney is a professor of Computer Science in the School of Engineering.

"We always try to build games for the social good, and recently we tried directing them to specific disabilities like cerebral palsy," Chesney said.

Read more
Stateside
1:47 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Do too many voters sit on the sidelines on Election Day?

Voting booths.
user eyspahn Flickr

A couple of recent columns in Bridge Magazine caught our eye and we wanted to bring the writers together to share their thoughts with you.

The subject: exercising our right to vote.

From coast-to-coast, too many Americans sit on the sidelines when it comes to Election Day.

And, looking at the City of Detroit, with its state-appointed emergency manager running things, Detroiter Karen Dumas believes that Detroiters have paid a price for what she calls a "lack of diligence."

She spelled out her thoughts in a recent Bridge column.

And Bridge staff writer Nancy Derringer reports on a group in Detroit trying to "make voting cool," especially among the young people who are starting to move into the city.

Listen to the full interview above.

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