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4:36 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, May 9th, 2013

When you grab a bottle of water at the grocery store, do you ever wonder where that water came from.

And do you really know the quality of that water? We found out if it's really better than what comes out of your tap.

And, we look at the upcoming Detroit Grand Prix , bringing auto lovers to Belle Isle, along with some badly needed cash.

And Governor Rick Snyder has signed Senate Bill 288, and that could lead to a wolf hunt in the Upper Peninsula.

His signature clears the way for the state's Natural Resources Commission to vote on a recommendation to hold a limited wolf hunt this fall in three parts of the UP.
    
The Governor told Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith that he believes the NRC will base its decision on what he called "sound scientific principles."

Stateside
4:36 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

The controversy around a wolf hunt in Michigan

endangeredspecieslawandpolicy.com

Governor Rick Snyder has signed Senate Bill 288. That could clear the way for a wolf hunt in the Upper Peninsula.

His signature clears the way for the state's Natural Resources Commission to vote on a recommendation to hold a limited wolf hunt this fall in three parts of the UP.

The Governor told Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith that he believes the NRC will base its decision on what he called "sound scientific principles."

"If you think about it, I think sound scientific principals are how we should decide these things, to make sure we are doing the proper environmental functions that protect whatever species we're talking about, so it's sustainable for the long term," said Snyder.

More than quarter of a million Michiganders  signed a petition asking to put a wolf hunt proposal on the November 2014 ballot. And the coalition called Keep Michigan Wolves Protected says Senate Bill 288 is a deliberate attempt by lawmakers to circumvent their petition effort.

The Governor's response?

Read more
Politics & Culture
5:21 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

On today's program, we explore the idea of secret work groups crafting public policy in Lansing, and how transparent Michigan's government should be.

And we look at whether expanding the lottery to the internet is a good idea.

We'll also hear how new technology being developed here in Michigan might be able to help authorities identify potential threats in airports or in large crowds.

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Politics & Government
5:16 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Just how public is our government?

Gov. Rick Snyder talks to reporters at the Lansing Center.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

How transparent should the process of our government be?

That’s the question behind the use of “work groups” or “task forces” — unofficial, closed-door committees being created in Lansing to help design and craft policy.  Following the revelation of the so-called “skunk works” education work group that was made public by the Detroit News two weeks ago, we wanted to look at how these groups operate in Lansing. Have work groups increased under Governor Rick Snyder? What’s the possible impact on our democratic system of government?

Chad Livengood from the Detroit News and Michigan Radio’s political analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the growing awareness of Lansing’s work groups, and how voters can know who or what is influencing these committees.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:05 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

On today's show: The U.S. Senate seat is open in Michigan come 2014. It's just sitting there for the taking. So, just who will take over the job opening after Carl Levin's retirement?

We'll speak with Congressman Gary Peters - Democrat - who has announced that he wants the job - and, we'll speak with a Republican strategist about why Republicans have yet to jump in the race. Just what does it mean for the GOP's chances if a candidate takes too long to announce?

And, then, later in the hour: a conversation with the music director of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra: Maestro Leonard Slatkin. He's in New York as the DSO plays Carnegie Hall.

But first we go to Lansing where we've been following a bill that's working its way through the State Legislature.

The legislation would require people getting welfare benefits to pass a drug test in order to receive those benefits. The substance abuse screening would be required if there's "reasonable suspicion" that the person is using illegal drugs.

State Representative Jeff Farrington (R-Utica) sponsored the bill in the House. He says the government should not pay for people's drug habits.

Politics & Government
4:15 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Who’s betting on an online lottery system?

Gov. Rick Snyder wants to implement iLottery, an online lottery system.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

How would you like to buy lottery tickets online?

Governor Rick Snyder bets you would.

His administration is asking for more than $3 million to launch an online lottery system called iLottery, where buyers could purchase tickets right from their computers.

But the plan has foes in both the state House and Senate, who are maneuvering to block online lottery gaming.

Dave Eggert, the Lansing reporter for the Associated Press, fills us in on the ongoing battle for digital lottery.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:48 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Building better security screening systems

Could radar be used in future screening systems?
user g7ahn Flickr

In the aftermath of school shootings, theater shootings, and bombings, the question of security screening has become real and important.

How do we balance privacy concerns and rights with the need to screen for potential threats?

A University of Michigan professor is working on that challenge: building a better security detector.

Dr Kamal Sarabondi is a professor of electrical engineering, and he's the director of the Radiation Laboratory at the University of Michigan.

He's gotten funding from the U.S. Department of Defense and is developing a long-range radar technology as a means to detect a concealed object. He explains what it is and how it differs from what we have today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:14 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Talking with Congressman, and now Senate candidate, Gary Peters

Gary Peters in his Washington D.C. office. He's hoping to move next door, to the Senate, in 2014.
Gary Peters Facebook

It's been nearly two months since U.S. Senator Carl Levin (D-MI) announced he would not seek a seventh term.

That announcement sets up one of the biggest political questions in Michigan: who will take over his seat in 2014?

Last week , three-time Congressman Gary Peters announced he will run for Levin's seat. Democrats say Peters gives them a strong candidate.

Republicans say the Congressman has supported left-leaning policies that have become unpopular in Michigan.

Congressman, and now Senate candidate, Gary Peters joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:14 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Michigan moving closer to drug testing welfare recipients

Drug test.
user publik15 Flickr

We've been following a bill that's now working its way through the State Legislature.

The House has already said "yes" and passed it. Now it's on to the Senate.

In short: the legislation would require people getting welfare to pass a drug test in order to receive benefits.

The substance abuse screening would be required if there's "reasonable suspicion" that the person is using illegal drugs.

Representative Jeff Farrington (R-Utica) sponsored the bill in the House saying the government should not pay for people's drug habits.

"People are tired of applicants getting welfare payments when they're using them for illegal drug use," said Farrington. "We want to make sure that they get on the right track, they receive their treatment going forward and they get on the right path to success."

Supporters of the bill say only people who test positive would have to pay for the cost of the drug test.

Critics say suspicion-based drug testing demonizes the poor and unfairly hurts children of addicts.

Melissa Smith is a senior policy analyst with the Michigan League for Human Services. She researched the effectiveness of these welfare drug testing programs and she joins us now from Lansing.

She analyzed how "suspicion-based drug testing" is working in other states and shares what she found with us.

What she found?

A lot of money is wasted on these programs and not a lot is accomplished.

Listen to the full-interview above.

Stateside
5:14 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Why we should talk about 'rape culture' on college campuses

College campuses educate students about sexual assault
User: t3rmin4t0r/Flickr

An interview with Jess Klein.

  When parents send their daughters off to college, they do so with their fingers tightly crossed that they will remain safe and sound.

As young women living on their own, a myriad of situations present themselves that could put women in dangerous situations, like walking home late at night and college parties.

Statistics from the Centers for Disease  Control (CDC) support parents' worries.

One in five women report having been raped at some point in their life - the figure is one in 71 for men.

So, what can be done to stop this?

Read more
Stateside
5:11 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra plays Carnegie Hall

Maestro Leonard Slatkin conducting the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.
Leonard Slatkin

It’s been 17 years since the Detroit Symphony Orchestra has graced the stage of one of the most famous concert halls in the world - Carnegie Hall.

So it was big news for Michigan’s cultural scene when the DSO became one of the symphony orchestras chosen for the 2013 "Spring for Music." It's one week, five orchestras, and six concerts at Carnegie Hall.
 
The DSO will perform two separate programs - one on May 9th, the second on May 10th.
 
The music director of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Maestro Leonard Slatkin, joined us from New York City today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:11 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Who will the Republicans put up for U.S. Senate?

U.S. Senator Carl Levin (D-MI) is not running for a seventh term.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

  Who might be the Republicans' best hope of winning Michigan's Senate seat?

Republican strategist Dennis Lennox joined us today.

We asked him why a Republican hasn't jumped into the race yet and who their ideal candidate might be.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:10 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

Stateside for Monday, May 6th, 2013

  Detroit automakers stand to lose a stunning $4 billion dollars in Europe this year. On today's show: we'll take a look at how the financial mess in Europe is effecting the domestic automakers. And, then, singer/song-writer Matt Jones stops by the studio to talk about his newest work and overcoming a challenging -year.

And colleges are holding commencement ceremonies right about now.  

What will all those graduates do with their shiny new degrees?

Based on recent surveys something like half of the graduates from our state hit the road seeking greener pastures in other states within a year of graduating. It's the Michigan "Brain Drain."

One state lawmaker wants to help stem the brain drain by offering tax credits on their student loan payments to college grads who stay in Michigan.

Could tax credits help stem the brain drain?  Or is it a band-aid that masks a deeper challenge for college graduates in Michigan?

State Representative Andy Schor joined us today. He's a freshman Democrat from Lansing and the sponsor of House Bill 4182.

Read more
Stateside
5:04 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

A freshman Representative's bill could fix Michigan's 'Brain Drain'

Andy Schor's Michigan "Brain Drain" Bill was heard in committee last Wednesday
Michigan House Democrats

 As new grads drift out of Ann Arbor after last weekend's commencement, where will they go?

Degrees in hand, they're on the job search - which doesn't mean they're staying in Michigan.

State Representative Andy Schor, D-Lansing, is the sponsor of House Bill 4182, which would provide tax credits to college graduates of public or private four-year colleges and universities in Michigan.

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Politics & Government
5:04 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

Why are Detroit automakers losing out in Europe?

GM's headquarters in Detroit.
Carlos Lowry Flickr

  If you hear the word Europe, you might find yourself thinking of great places to travel, a rich history, or family roots.

If you're an auto executive and you hear “Europe,” you’ll likely sigh and take a couple of aspirin for your headache.

That's because the Detroit automakers stand to lose $4 billion in Europe this year. And with a collapse in auto sales across the pond, trying to muscle through the kinds of changes that saved the industry here in North America is a totally different challenge in Europe.

Michelle Krebs of Edmunds.com and Michigan Radio’s auto reporter Tracy Samilton discuss the bleak picture in Europe for Detroit automakers.

Listen to the full interview above.

Culture
5:03 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

'The People's Campaign' offers a helping hand

  In rural America of the 1800s, it was common for neighbors to pull together to help each other. Harvest time - barn-raisings - there was a sense of "you help me, I help you."

It's that old-fashioned image of the community barn-raising that comes to mind when you hear about The People's Campaign which launched over the weekend on Detroit's East Side.

The People's Campaign is headed-up by Sharlonda Buckman who is the executive director of the Detroit Parent Network.

She joined us to tell us more.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
3:20 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

Ypsilanti's Matt Jones finds salvation in his music

Matt Jones performing with Misty Lyn Bergeron at Michigan Radio.
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

His name is Matt Jones. He's 35 and he's based in Ypsilanti. He's been writing songs and performing around Michigan for the past 15 years. He has growing audience of fans and has received more critical acclaim.

And his story is one of overcoming personal demons and finding salvation in the thing he loves best: making music.

Matt joined us in the studio today to talk about his music.

Matt Jones on Stateside.

Click the link above to hear Cyndy's conversation with Matt.

Matt also performed for our "Songs from Studio East" series. You can check out that performance here:

You can check out more of Matt's music here: http://mattjones.bandcamp.com/

Politics & Culture
6:11 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

  On today's show, we explore the bureaucratic hurdles of the international adoption system, and how it's keeping children trapped in orphanages around the world.

Then we switch gears and discover whether our state symbol, the wolverine, ever lived here.

And Michigan Democratic Congressman Gary Peters has made it official: he will run for the U.S. Senate seat opening up with the retirement of Carl Levin.

The three-term congressman is from Bloomfield Township in Oakland County, an area important to winning a statewide race.

 The GOP has yet to announce who might run for that up-for-grabs Senate seat.

And we turn to the situation in the city of Ecorse. Officials say the financial emergency in the city has been resolved.
 
Ecorse has been under the control of an emergency manager since 2009 – when then-Governor Jennifer Granholm made the appointment.
 
Now, word comes that the city’s budget is balanced and a $20 million deficit has been eliminated.
 
But the announcement doesn't mean elected officials are getting their authority back right away. That’s because Joyce Parker – Ecorse's former emergency manager - has given the city a two-year budget that it must follow.
 
Parker – who we should note is also the emergency manager of Allen Park– joined us today.

Read more
Politics & Government
6:05 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

With 'financial emergency' over in Ecorse, Joyce Parker still watching

Joyce Parker

  State officials say the financial emergency in the city of Ecorse has been resolved.
 
The city has been under the control of an emergency manager since 2009 – when then-Governor Jennifer Granholm made the appointment.
 
Now, word comes that the city’s budget is balanced and a $20 million deficit has been eliminated.
 
But the announcement doesn't mean elected officials are getting their authority back right away. That’s because Joyce Parker – Ecorse's former emergency manager - has given the city a two-year budget that it must follow.
 
Parker – who we should note is also the emergency manager of Allen Park– joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Environment & Science
6:03 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

'The Wolverine State' without any wolverines

A wolverine.
Jeff Ford

We've got the nickname "The Wolverine State," and of course, the University of Michigan and the Wolverines are forever linked.

But the wolverine never called Michigan home.

The wolverine population in the United States is anything but big. An estimated 250-300 wolverines live in the lower 48 states.

One of the experts who devotes herself to protecting the wolverine is, in fact, a "Wolverine."

Bridget Fahey is a 1997 graduate of U-M's School of Natural Resources and Environment.

These days, Fahey is the Endangered Species Chief with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the mountain prairie region.

She joined us today to talk about wolverines.

Listen to the full interview above.

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