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Arts & Culture
11:13 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Write A House is giving free houses to writers in Detroit

Credit Charles & Adrienne Esseltine / Flickr

What if you were a writer, a journalist, or a poet, and you were given a free house in Detroit?

You'd be an urban homesteader, living in the city and writing about it.

That's the idea behind a project called Write a House.

Journalist Sarah Cox is the co-founder of Write A House and explained how it works on Stateside.  

Listen to interview in link above.  

Weather
11:12 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Ice on Lake Superior is slowly melting

Credit User jen-the-librarian / Flickr

OK, maybe you’ve seen the picture: sunny, 80-degree weather and people lying out in the sand – maybe even getting sunburned on the shores of Lake Superior. And maybe, there in the background, huge pieces of ice still floating around in the lake.

John Lenters is a climatologist at Ann Arbor-based LimnoTech, an environmental consulting firm.

Lenters says says because of the size and depth of the lakes, it will take a while for them to warm up after the extremely cold winter.

The ice is melting, but Lake Superior warms up slowly before it hits 39 degrees Fahrenheit.

*Listen to the interview above. 

Transportation
4:50 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

4 things to know about gas prices in Michigan

Gas prices from the past at the shuttered Logan's Gas and Deli near Battle Creek.
Credit Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s roads are crumbling and some put the estimate to fix them at almost $2 billion a year.

State lawmakers are in the midst of considering raising revenue through higher taxes on gas, and that has raised a lot of debate around what we already pay at the pump.

Michigan Radio’s Mark Brush recently wrote about how gas prices in Michigan work, and he compiled a list of four things for us to consider when thinking about what we pay at the pump.

*You can listen to our interview with Brush above.

Here’s his list:

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Arts & Culture
4:34 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Literary map sees Detroit through the eyes of writers

Credit Peter Martorano / Flickr

The Literary Map of Detroit is not your typical, predictable map of the Motor City. It looks at Detroit through the eyes of writers, poets and storytellers.

The map is actually a website, with locations that are mentioned in literary works by Detroit authors.

Frank Rashid, an English professor at Marygrove college and lifelong Detroiter, created the map.

Rashid created the map to challenge the belief that Detroit’s economic and social problems stem from one simple cause, such as a politician or Detroiters themselves, by providing works from writers that provide an inside look of the city and its history. The literature of Detroit, in combination with economic and historical studies, can help understand the where the issues originate.

Rashid said the map differs from the  superficial treatment of the city in some current literature. He hopes to inspire viewers to see and think about Detroit in a new way.

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Politics & Culture
4:22 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Stateside for Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

  Once the United Auto Workers boasted a formidable membership with more than one and half million members. Today: that number is drastically smaller, almost three-fourths smaller, with 390-thousand members.

Much has been written about whether or not the UAW is dead.

But, on today's Stateside, we asked, with such dwindling numbers does it really matter? And, to whom?

There is still ice on Lake Superior in the beginning of June. What is the cause?

A literary map of Detroit as seen through the eyes of writers, author’s and storytellers provides insight of Detroit’s history.

Also, want a free house? Well, if you're a writer, and ready to move to Detroit, you might just be in luck.

But, first on Stateside…

Michigan’s roads are crumbling and people want them fixed. Some estimates say it could cost almost 2 billion dollars a year to fix them.

State lawmakers are in the midst of considering raising revenue through higher taxes on gas and that has raised a lot of debate around what we already pay at the pump.

Michigan Radio’s Mark Brush set out to sort this out for all of us. 

*Listen to full show above. 

Economy
5:05 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Michigan creates EB-5 program to attract job-creating immigrants

Detroit's first Latina council member, Raquel-Castaneda-Lopez, speaks at a press event earlier this year announcing Michigan’s intention to establish an “EB-5 regional center.”
Credit screen shot from LiveStream

It's called the EB-5 program. It's based on the employment-based 5th preference visa program, which allows foreign investors and their families to get their green cards – get permanent residency – by investing in an enterprise that creates at least 10 direct or indirect jobs in Michigan.

Private companies have been using the EB-5 program to bring immigrants into the country, but Michigan has become only the second state – after Vermont – to create a state EB-5 program. It will be staffed by the Michigan State Housing Development Authority.

Scott Woosley is the MSHDA Executive Director.

*Listen to the full show above.

Politics & Culture
5:05 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Stateside for Monday, June 2, 2014

According to a report by a former head of the state Treasury Department's Office of Revenue and Tax Analysis, Michigan has been cutting taxes over the last 20 years. That's He finds, overall, Michigan's had the smallest increase in taxes in the country as measured on a per capita basis between 1977 and 2011.

On today’s Stateside, we looked at the effect of two decades of tax cuts in Michigan, and found out whether anyone has actually benefited.

Next, we checked in with an Ann Arbor- based group that records music by people who live in struggling villages in Senegal and turns the recordings into profits that go directly back to the communities.

But first on today’s show, we got an update on Detroit’s bankruptcy.

It has been a busy few days in Detroit's bankruptcy journey. Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr and Mayor Mike Duggan were on Mackinac Island last week making their collective cases to the state's lawmakers and business leaders.

At the same time, the city's pensioners have begun to vote on the plan of adjustment, even as opponents of the “Grand Bargain” are seeking new ways to get their hands on the city's art.

Detroit News Lansing reporter Chad Livengood joined us today.

*Listen to the full show above.

Stateside
5:04 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

The latest on Detroit's bankruptcy after the Mackinac Policy Conference

Credit Peter Martorano / Flickr

Today we got an update on Detroit’s bankruptcy.

It has been a busy few days in Detroit's bankruptcy journey. Emergency manager Kevyn Orr and Mayor Mike Duggan were on Mackinac Island last week making their collective cases to the state's lawmakers and business leaders.

At the same time, the city's pensioners have begun to vote on the plan of adjustment, even as opponents of the “grand bargain” are seeking new ways to get their hands on the city's art.

Detroit News Lansing reporter Chad Livengood and Michigan Radio's Zoe Clark joined us today.

*Listen to the interview above.

Stateside
5:04 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

The new right-to-farm requirements and backyard animals

Josh Larios Wikimedia

Recent changes in the Michigan right-to farm requirements have drawn criticisms from those worried it may curtail their ability to keep bees, chickens, or other farm animals in their backyards.

But are these changes as threatening to urban farming as detractors fear?

Writer Anna Clark has looked into the revisions in the right-to farm requirements and she believes the answer is “no.”

*Listen to the full show above.

Economy
5:02 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Report finds tax cuts have not been helping Michigan's economy

IRS Form 1040.
Credit stockphotosforfree.com

Michigan has been cutting taxes for the past 20 years. The key selling point has been that slashing taxes will create economic prosperity.

A new report by the former head of the state Treasury Department's Office of Revenue and Tax Analysis, Douglas Drake, says these tax cuts have instead drained Michigan of economic life, with our per-capita income rank tumbling, and our unemployment rate way above the national average.

Charles Ballard is an economist from Michigan State University.

*Listen to the full show above.

Stateside
4:54 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Ann Arbor group records Senegalese music for struggling villages

Griots and musicians from six villages came to record with Community Voice International in Sare Bidji, Senegal.
Credit Community Voice International

The music of the Keur Daouda Cisse village in Senegal has been recorded for Community Voice International.

They are just one of 10 communities that has been recorded for the organization. It's an Ann Arbor-based group that records music by people who live in struggling villages in Senegal and turns the recordings into profits that go directly back to the community.

The Founder and Executive Director of Community Voice International, David Bleckley, joined us today.

*Listen to the full show above.

Politics & Culture
8:26 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, May 29, 2014

First on Stateside, Gov. Rick Snyder joined us from the Mackinac Policy Conference, followed by Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes.

The prevalence of social media has changed a lot in our world, and in the wake of graduation season social media may affect job prospects for applicants. Having social media profiles that are professional may be the key to landing a job. 

University of Michigan researchers have developed a new app for smartphones that can detect mood swings in bipolar patients via voice analysis, so that patients can get the help they need. 

In the midst of all of the recalls, General Motors is approaching its five-year anniversary of declaring bankruptcy. 

*Listen to the full episode above. 

Stateside
4:33 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

GM approaches 5 years since bankruptcy

Credit John F. Martin / Creative Commons

At 8 a.m. on June 1, 2009, General Motors filed for Chapter 11 reorganization. That filing in the bankruptcy court in Manhattan was the start of a painful and historic journey for General Motors. 

Five years later, after a massive government equity investment, General Motors is doing well, although it has been rocked recently by the ignition switch recall controversy, and a blizzard of other recalls. 

Let's take stock of what GM has done in the last five years, and see if the prevention of job and income losses was worth the cost to taxpayers. 

Sonari Glinton is NPR's business reporter, and he joined us on Stateside. 

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:33 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

New app listens to bipolar patients, detects mood swings by voice analysis

The PRIORI app listens for voice inflections that indicate mood swings.
Credit uofmhealth.org

The National Institute of Mental Health tells us that some 5.7 million American adults struggle with bipolar disorder. 

A critical part of managing the disorder is the ability to sense when the mood swings are about to happen – something the patient isn't aware of – and get that patient to a physician straight away for help.

A research team at the University of Michigan is working on a smartphone program called PRIORI. It detects mood swings through voice analysis of phone conversations, while still protecting the patient's privacy. 

Dr. Melvin McInnis is one of the researchers. He's a psychiatrist and a bipolar specialist, and he joined us on Stateside. 

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:31 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

How to ensure your job application is social media savvy

A well developed LinkedIn profile and a professional social media presence could make all the difference in the job hunt.
Credit user: Chris Messina / Flickr

The graduation ceremonies are over, the caps and gowns stored in the back of the closet, and the photos of college grads and proud family members are posted on Facebook. 

Now comes reality for new college grads: the job search. 

And in this digital world packed with social media, the old-fashioned one-page resume and cover letter might not cut it anymore. 

What do recruiters and companies want to see from applicants? 

For advice, we turned to someone who has been a career counselor for 13 years at the University of Michigan School of Information. Joanna Kroll is the director of career development, and she joined us on Stateside. 

*Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:28 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Gov. Snyder joins us from the Mackinac Policy Conference

Credit Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Governor Rick Snyder joined us on Stateside from the Mackinac Policy Conference to talk about minimum wage, the economy, and other issues being covered at the conference.

Then, Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes joined us.

*Listen to the full interviews above. 

Stateside
7:59 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Many people who have full-time jobs qualify for food stamps

We keep hearing that companies are looking for workers to fill high-skill, good-paying jobs. Why are some full-time workers in Michigan qualifying for food stamps?
Credit American Panel

Four years into the recovery from the Great Recession, what kinds of jobs are most available?

A recent report from the National Employment Law Project finds the poor economy has replaced good jobs with bad ones. 

Additionally, a recent analysis done for Bridge Magazine looked at the fastest-growing jobs in Michigan. Bridge's analysis found that many full-time workers will be paid so little that they'll qualify for food stamps.

We keep hearing that companies in Michigan are looking for workers to fill  high-skill, good-paying jobs. Is this not true? 

Stateside's Cynthia Canty spoke with Charles Ballard and Gilda Jacobs. Ballard is an economist at Michigan State University and Jacobs is the president and CEO of the Michigan League for Public Policy. 

Listen to the interview by clicking the link above. 

Stateside
7:19 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

The chairs of both major parties chime in from the Mackinac Policy Conference

The Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.
Credit Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

  The 2014 Mackinac Policy Conference began today at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.

Political and business leaders are gathering to discuss the major issues and challenges facing Michigan, and to hear from guest speakers.

Statewide elections are just five months away, so both parties have a lot of work to do between then and now.

We got the views from the Michigan leaders of both parties.

Joining us from Mackinac Island, we welcomed the chair of the Michigan Republican Party, Bobby Schostak, and the chair of the Michigan Democratic Party, Lon Johnson.

*Listen to the interviews above.

Politics & Culture
7:12 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, May 28, 2014

  Many in state government tout the fact that more jobs have been created in the past 10 years, but these are not necessarily high wage jobs with benefits; sometimes not even enough of a paycheck to raise a family of four above the poverty line.

On today’s Stateside, what does it mean if the economy is creating a majority of low-wage, unskilled jobs?

Later in the show, we listened to the winners from Michigan Radio's Great Michigan Read "One Minute" story-writing contest. The theme for the contest was "Hidden branches of your family tree: Unexpected stories that changed the way you think of yourself or your family."

But first we get an update on the happenings at the Mackinac Policy Conference.

Stateside
6:52 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

The oldest video store in the US is in Royal Oak, but now it's closing

Thomas Video in Royal Oak is closing their doors.

Thomas Video opened in 1974, and was the first store in the country to sell films. 

On Stateside, we spoke with Jim Olenski, the owner of Thomas Video about his business and why it's closing. 

According to Olenski, the store has been losing money for a long time, partly because of the rise in online movie streaming options, like Netflix. 

To hear Cynthia Canty's interview with Olenski, click the link above.   

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