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Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
 
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
 
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
 
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
 
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
 
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
 
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
 
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
 
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
 
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
 
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
 
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
 
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
 
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
 
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways to Connect

A recall petition for Flint Mayor Karen Weaver.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A recall petition targeting Flint’s mayor reaches a milestone this week.

Recall organizer Arthur Woodson declined to comment last week on the status of the campaign. However, in the past Woodson has said volunteers have collected more than 6,000 signatures since a judge cleared the way for recall petition process to begin in April.

Flint Mayor Weaver, Lansing Mayor Bernaro, and Ret. Brig. Gen. Michael McDaniel stand next to the lead pipe.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Flint’s pipe replacement program faces a critical deadline at the end of this week.

By Friday, Flint needs to replace its 2,037th lead or galvanized service line.

That would be approximately 7% of the estimated number of suspect pipes tied to the city’s lead tainted tap water crisis.

The mandated 7% threshold is part of the federal Lead and Copper Rule.  

A car sits in the flooded parking lot of Midland's downtown farmers' market.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

As floodwaters begin to recede, government officials are assessing the damage in Midland and Isabella counties. 

Storms dumped more than seven inches of rain on parts of mid-Michigan last week, flooding homes and washing out roads.

“In Midland County alone, there’s been 116 roads affected,” says Mark Bone, president of the Midland County Board of Commissioners. “There’s a lot of roads out there we’re still gathering the information, but there’s a lot of damage.”

Getting to work or school is going to be a problem in the areas affected by the flooding.

ADAM J.W.C. / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

AAA is predicting nearly one and a half million Michiganders will travel more than 50 miles during the upcoming Fourth of July holiday weekend.

AAA-Michigan spokeswoman Susan Hiltz credits various factors, including an extra-long holiday weekend this year.

“The last time we had travel volume this big was about 15 years ago,” says Hiltz, “So it’s definitely big news for our state and great news for the travel industry.”

But Hiltz cautions more people traveling means Michigan’s highways will be bulging during the Independence Day holiday weekend.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint City Council is defying state and federal government officials, as well as the city’s mayor, and is putting off a vote on a drinking water contract for another two weeks.

“This was a matter of millimeters,” says Dr. Donald Scholten, Hurvley Medical Center trauma surgeon, of how close the knife came to slashing arteries in Lt. Jeff Neville's neck.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A Flint airport police officer injured in a suspected terrorist attack this week is expected to go home after spending the weekend recovering at a local hospital.

Lt. Jeff Neville was stabbed in the neck at Flint’s Bishop International Airport Wednesday morning.    Investigators say 49-year-old Amor Ftouhi used a knife he purchased as he travelled from his home in Montreal to Flint.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan State University plans to press incoming freshmen to sign up for more courses.

MSU President Lou Anna Simon says studies show first-year college students who take 30 credits their freshman year are more likely to graduate in four years.

“If you take more credits, no matter your preparation the first year, you’re going to be able to graduate higher,” says Simon, “Student success is really important because you’re investing a lot of money and the value of your degree is when you finish.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan State University trustees clashed today  over a trustee’s recent outing of a whistleblower in a sexual assault case involving the school’s football program.

MSU Trustee Mitch Lyons has come under fire for his comments on a Tuesday radio interview that former player Auston Robertson reported a January sexual assault incident in a meeting with Mark Dantonio.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The East Lansing city council has approved a tentative deal paving the way for a $132 million development project that would change the look of the college town’s downtown.

The 12-story complex will include hundreds of apartments and retail space.   

Mayor Mark Meadows hopes the Center City District project will attract more older people to East Lansing’s downtown.    

“Now someone can open a retail space that doesn’t just cater to somebody who’s 18 to 24 years old,” says Meadows.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s mayor is the latest to call on the city council to sign-off on a plan to keep Flint’s tap water flowing from Detroit.

Back in April, Flint Mayor Karen Weaver announced she wanted her city to continue to get its tap water from the Great Lakes Water Authority. The agreement has support from various stakeholders, but so far not the Flint city council.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Fewer insurance companies will be offering health care plans in Michigan through the Affordable Care Act marketplace this fall.

Since Obamacare began, Michigan insurance regulators have vetted the companies willing to offer health care plans in the state.  This year, they’ll have fewer companies to vet. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A defense attorney wants a court to limit prosecutors’ future public comments about the Flint water crisis criminal cases.

Lawyers took part in a probable cause conference today in Flint.

Attorney James White represents former Flint city public works director Howard Croft, who’s facing numerous charges, including involuntary manslaughter.

(l to r) Former Flint Emergency Managers Gerald Ambrose and Darnell Earley, and former city employees Howard Croft and Daugherty Johnson.
Steve Carmody, and State of Michigan / Michigan Radio

A Genesee County courtroom will see another hearing in the Flint water crisis later today.  

The probable cause hearing will look at issues related to a variety of charges against former emergency managers Darnell Earley and Gerald Ambrose and former city employees Daugherty Johnson and Howard Croft.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The president of the Flint city council says it may be time to review the council’s ethics policy after another council member was jailed for a probation violation.

Two Flint city council members have spent time behind bars in the past two years.

Kerry Nelson is the Flint city council president. He says the councilmen’s legal issues may lead to changes in their ethics code.

“About the ethics part, we have to really look at that and determine what this community is really looking for and what it needs,” says Nelson.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan farmers are among those criticizing President Trump’s plan to impose new business and travel restrictions on Cuba.

President Donald Trump is clamping down on some commerce and travel between the United States and Cuba, but leaving intact many new avenues President Barack Obama opened.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Wayne State University researchers say active seniors face a growing risk.

People over 55 are encouraged to get out and exercise more.

But Wayne State researchers says there was a 45% increase in older Americans showing up in emergency rooms with broken noses and other facial fractures in recent years.

Flint city hall
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Flint city council today voted to override the mayor’s veto of next year’s city budget.

The dispute over a miniscule amount of money threatened to leave Flint without the ability to pay city workers next month.   

It’s the latest in a series of squabbles over city spending between the council and Mayor Karen Weaver. 

Attorney General Bill Schuette
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

New charges in the Flint water crisis are connected to the Legionnaires’ disease outbreak.

Five current and former government officials are now facing involuntary manslaughter charges in the Flint water crisis. The charges are in connection with a Legionnaires' disease outbreak during the height of the crisis. Legionnaires’ disease is a serious form of pneumonia caused by bacteria.

KANDYJAXX/CREATIVE COMMONS

Michigan’s unemployment rate fell a half percentage point in May.

Michigan’s jobless rate fell to its lowest level last month since December of 2000 to 4.2%.  

“These numbers should encourage all Michiganders to continue to work hard and keep our foot on the gas,” Gov. Rick Snyder said in a written statement. “We are moving forward on a great path toward our future.  The state's continued commitment to workforce development along with the lowest unemployment rate our state has seen in nearly 17 years proves that.”

Lansing's city hall
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing’s outgoing mayor wants to sell city hall and find a new home for the city's offices.    

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero today formally asked for proposals from businesses interested in turning Lansing City Hall’s downtown location into a hotel, office space, residential units or retail space.  He’s also asking for a plan to relocate city offices elsewhere.

aerial photo of the Great Lakes
National Oceanic and And Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Environmentalists and their allies in Congress are stepping up their efforts to fight proposed cuts to federal Great Lakes funding and the EPA budget.

President Trump proposed deep cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency’s budget, as well as effectively eliminating federal money for Great Lakes restoration projects.  The Trump budget would shift the financial burden of maintaining the Great Lakes onto the eight states in the region.     

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Flint city council Monday night delayed a vote on extending the contract with the city’s drinking water supplier.

Flint has been getting its tap water from the Great Lakes Water Authority since October, 2015. The switch to GLWA ended an 18-month experiment that had the city get its drinking water from the Flint River, with disastrous results.

a moose being released
Michigan Department of Natural Resources

The moose population in the western Upper Peninsula appears to be rebounding after taking a dip a few years ago.

Moose were reintroduced into the western U.P. in the 1980s. Their range there covers about 1,400 square miles in parts of Marquette, Baraga, and Iron Counties. 

The moose population in the area grew to 451 in 2013 before dropping down to 285 in 2015.

But Michigan Department of Natural Resources spokesman John Pepin says the just completed aerial survey counted 378 moose.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Centers for Disease Control is out with a new national study on Legionnaires' disease and health care facilities.

It points to plumbing in hospital, nursing homes and other health care facilities as potential sources for the disease.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new study says as we age, friendships become more important to happiness than family ties.

William Chopik is an assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s a new study that identifies what parts of the Great Lakes might be most at environmental risk if there’s an oil spill.

Oil is transported through the Great Lakes region by pipeline, train and ship.  

Jerome Marty is the president of the Society of Canadian Limnologists.  The society studies inland waterways.     

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

If the Federal Reserve raises interest rates as expected later this week, one economist says Michigan’s economy could take a hit.

The Fed is expected to hike interest rates by 25 basis points to 1.00-1.25 percent at its June 13-14 meeting.

Robert Dye is Comerica Bank’s chief economist. He expects the Fed board will approve a quarter of a percentage point increase in the prime rate when it meets this week. It would be the second hike this year.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new tax break for redeveloping blighted land in Michigan is now law.

Gov. Rick Snyder signed the bill Thursday as he sat in the gutted lobby of a 120-year-old office building in downtown Saginaw. The Berringer building has sat unused for years as a series owners have tried and failed to renovate it.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report finds many of Michigan’s state lawmakers have been penalized for not properly filing their campaign finance reports.

The Michigan Campaign Finance Network scoured through state records and found fifty percent of current state lawmakers have paid fines for failing to follow Michigan’s campaign finance reporting requirements.

Executive Director Craig Mauger says most paid small amounts, while a few had to pay thousands of dollars.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A lengthy order from a federal judge is allowing part of a wide-ranging Flint water crisis lawsuit to go forward. 

Plaintiffs are Flint residents Shari Guertin, her child and Diogenes Muse-Cleveland.  The suit claims a variety of state and local officials, government agencies, and private contractors’ actions caused their drinking water to become contaminated with lead and actively concealed the problem.

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