Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
 
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
 
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
 
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
 
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
 
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
 
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
 
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
 
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
 
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
 
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
 
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
 
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
 
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
 
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways To Connect

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s disagreement over who should be picking replacements for two soon-to-be-vacant Flint City Council seats.

The councilmen are leaving after being elected to other offices.

Flint emergency manager Darnell Earley says he is looking at the options, which may include selecting new council members himself.

“That is an option that will be reviewed in addition to other options that are also available,” says Earley.

Several council members say they would rather the emergency manager let the council decide appointments like it has in the past.   

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Republicans may hope to deliver the state to the GOP presidential nominee in 2016, after sweeping nearly all of Tuesday’s statewide races.    

Republicans won races for governor, attorney general, secretary of state, along with numerous congressional races. Democrats held on to the U.S. Senate seat on Tuesday’s ballot. 

That might leave Republicans with the feeling Michigan may be ready to slide into the GOP column in the 2016 presidential race.

But Bill Ballenger of Inside Michigan Politics thinks that might be unrealistic.    

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Developers signed an agreement to build a quarter-billion dollar housing and retail complex in Lansing today.

Now they just have to figure out how to build it in a floodplain.

The Red Cedar Renaissance project is intended to transform an old golf course on Lansing’s east side into shopping and dining mecca with a mix of apartments and parkland. 

Developers plan to spend $200 million on the project. Another $76 million is earmarked for dealing with the problem that has long stalled development plans:  flooding.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Republican congressional leaders and President Barack Obama are talking about trying to find common ground moving forward.

Flint Congressman Dan Kildee says Tuesday’s election results showed voters are dissatisfied with the way things have been run in Washington.

But Democrat Kildee says Republicans should be careful how they read the results.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Now that Republicans have strengthened their control of the Michigan Legislature, one analyst expects a fight to repeal the state’s prevailing wage law.

Republicans picked up four seats in the state House on Tuesday, expanding their majority to 63 of the 110 seats. Republicans also added a state Senate seat.The GOP will hold a 27-to-11 margin in the Senate when the next session begins in 2015.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Flint Police Department is using a new tool to crack down on prostitution: Facebook. 

The department plans to post the photos of people arrested on prostitution charges on its Facebook page.

Police Chief James Tolbert says his department has been trying to curb prostitution in Flint. But he says repeated arrests and sweeps have not eliminated the problem.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Voters in Grand Rapids, Flint and Kalamazoo approved changes to their city charters.

Kalamazoo voters approved proposals that will change the way their mayor and city commissioners are elected. The mayor will be elected separately from the rest of the city commission and commissioners will serve longer terms.

Flint voters split on six proposed changes to the way their city runs. Voters rejected proposals to eliminate the city’s ombudsman office, the city’s civil service commission and several departments.   

USFWS

Michigan voters rejected a pair of referenda on state laws authorizing a wolf hunt in the Upper Peninsula.

Wolf hunt opponents celebrated tonight.  

“The people of Michigan have shown that they don’t want the trophy hunting and trapping of wolves,” says Jill Fritz with the group Keep Michigan Wolves Protected.

But this may just be a pyrrhic victory for wolf hunting opponents. The results of Tuesday’s vote amount to a non-binding referendum.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

An eyesore in downtown Lansing may finally have a brighter future.

A prominent Lansing developer is offering $1 million for the Oliver Towers. The former apartment building has sat largely vacant for more than a decade. It’s located on prime real estate in the heart of downtown Lansing, a block from the state Capitol building.

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero today announced a prominent Lansing developer, George F. Eyde Family LLC, has agreed to buy the building.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Lansing Board of Water & Light has chosen a longtime city firefighter as its new emergency operations manager.

Trent Atkins is the city's assistant fire chief.

BWL was heavily criticized for its response to an ice storm last December. More than 40,000 BWL customers lost electricity in the wake of the Dec. 21 ice storm. Thousands spent 10 days or more waiting for the lights to come back on.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan voters will decide races for governor, a U.S. Senate seat, members of Congress and other elected offices on Tuesday. 

But many won’t bother to vote on non-partisan races and questions on the ballot.

Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson says many voters just forget.

“Some people when they vote for one party or another, which is about 60% of the population, they don’t realize that there is more to the ballot,” says Johnson.

The long campaign for Michigan governor comes to an end today.

The candidates are making one final push before voters have their say on Election Day on Tuesday.

The candidates for governor are both trying to build momentum heading into tomorrow’s election.

Democrat Mark Schauer spent the weekend riding in a recreational vehicle, traveling from city to city, from the Upper Peninsula to Jackson. He says it’s a “blitz to the finish”.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Major renovations to Lansing’s downtown baseball stadium are costing more than expected.

City officials recently learned the renovations to the nearly 20-year-old ballpark would cost $3 million more than expected.

Bob Trezise is the president of the Lansing Economic Area Partnership. He says the problem is that the economy is getting better.

“The economy is rebounding and there aren’t enough construction firms and construction workers,” says Trezise. “So I think all construction projects are facing this ordeal right now.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint voters will decide on Tuesday if they want to make changes to the way their city government works.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Thirty students from Michigan fire departments, sheriff’s offices and other public safety agencies have spent the past two weeks learning about fire.

An old farmhouse served as a learning laboratory on Thursday for the fledgling fire investigators. Different rooms of the empty home south of Lansing were set on fire; the students had to figure out exactly how those fires were started.

Lenny Jaskulka is a specialist sergeant with the Michigan State police. He says there’s a lot to learn to become a certified fire scene investigator.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A controversial conference promoting creationism takes place at Michigan State University tomorrow.

The Oklahoma-based Christian group behind the conference says university students should not be taught solely the Theory of Evolution.

Mike Smith is the founder of the Creation Summit. He insists the goal is not to ban the teaching of evolution, only to make room for a biblical view of the origins of life on Earth.

“It would be good if the students could hear from both sides and draw their own conclusions,” says Smith.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report finds patient safety varies widely across Michigan.

A Washington D.C.-based group looked at how hospitals across the U.S. handled problems like mistakes in the operating room, drug mix-ups and bed sores.

23 of 79 Michigan hospitals surveyed in the report earned an “A” grade in patient safety.  A half-dozen Michigan hospitals received D’s.  No Michigan hospital received an “F” for patient safety.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today’s announcement that General Motors plans to spend $300 million in Michigan is good news not only for GM employees, but also for auto parts suppliers.

GM had previously announced the automaker's plans to invest $240 million in its Warren transmission plant. The plant will make the electric drive unit for the next-generation Chevy Volt. 

This Halloween, ‘trick or treaters’ may be greeted by more than the usual scary sights and sounds in Michigan.

Many homes will have teal colored pumpkins on their doorsteps. 

The teal pumpkins are a sign that that house will be handing out special treats to children with food allergies.

Veronica LaFamina is with the group ‘Food Allergy Research and Education’ or FARE.   She says one in 13 children have a serious food allergy.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

While all the attention on the November election has centered on statewide races for governor and Congress, there are other issues on the ballot.

Voters in several Michigan cities are being asked to make changes to their city charters in next month’s election.

For example, Kalamazoo voters are being asked if they want to make major changes to their roughly century-old city charter.

Kalamazoo voters elect their city commissioners every two years. The top vote-getter serves as mayor.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The next round of Obamacare sign-ups start next month.

Insurance companies have until November 5th to decide which of the plans they submitted, and were approved by state and federal regulators, to offer beginning November 15th.

Andrea Miller is with the Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services. She says the department’s Health Insurance Consumer Assistance Program website can help consumers start planning for picking or renewing their insurance policy.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

This week’s attack on the Canadian Parliament building raises questions about security at all government buildings.

On Wednesday, a lone gunman shot and killed a soldier standing guard at the national war memorial in Ottawa. The gunman was later shot and killed inside the parliament building.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

By this time next year, state officials hope to be ready to move into a new $22 million center to manage Michigan’s future emergencies.   

Ground was broken yesterday for the new State Emergency Operations Center. The center will serve as a command center to coordinate various local, state and federal agencies at times of emergency.

The old center has been activated several times in the past 12 months to coordinate the state response to floods, ice storms, and other natural disasters.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The University of Michigan athletic director is slashing student ticket prices for next fall’s football season.

U of M students were in near revolt earlier this fall, not only because of the school’s struggling football team, but also the higher prices they had to pay to watch a game at the Big House.   

The athletic department has agreed to slash prices for next season.  

The price for a student ticket package for all seven home games next fall will cost a third less than this year. The school’s also working on reduced pricing for students with financial need.

Heidelberg Project

A new report lists public art in Detroit and Toledo among the most endangered in the United States.

The Heidelberg Project in Detroit and the works of Greek-American artist Athena Tacha in Toledo are on the list compiled by the Cultural Landscape Foundation. The group works to preserve and protect notable U.S. landscapes.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report says a quarter of Michigan homeowners are underwater on their mortgages – and that’s a big improvement.

Back in 2012, roughly half of Michigan homeowners owed more on their mortgages than their homes were worth.

Daren Bloomquist of Realty Trac says Michigan, like the rest of the nation, has seen steady improvement in home values since the end of the recession.

@billclinton

Bill Clinton will be campaigning with Democrats in Flint tomorrow.

The former president is just the latest big-name Democrat to push for votes in Michigan. First Lady Michelle Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have made campaign stops in Detroit to rally the Democratic Party base in recent weeks.

President Barack Obama is expected to visit Michigan before Election Day.

One analyst says Democrats are bringing in big names in an attempt to boost turnout in next month’s election.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There are several major projects going on in Detroit these days. 

The M-1 RAIL line and a new hockey arena are among several projects attracting hundreds of millions of dollars into Detroit’s city center.  

But what about Detroit’s neighborhoods?   

The Kresge Foundation plans to spend up to $5 million to give a boost to Detroit neighborhoods.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A United Nations team says the city of Detroit is violating human rights by shutting off water to those who can’t pay their bills.

Some 27, 000 customers have had their water cut off during the first nine months of 2014. Detroit launched the water shutoff program as part of efforts to deal with the city’s financial problems.  

Narconon

State law enforcement and health officials will hold a summit on heroin addiction in Michigan Monday.

Heroin use has grown because of demand created by prescription drug abuse and cheap heroin coming across the border with Mexico.

“(Prescription drug abuse) leads to greater heroin abuse because people want to continue that high,” says Lt. Joseph Thomas, Michigan State Police post commander in Lansing.

Thomas says high school students are becoming heroin users in larger numbers.  

Pages