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Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
 
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
 
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
 
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
 
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
 
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
 
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
 
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
 
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
 
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
 
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
 
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
 
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
 
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
 
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways to Connect

Recall organizer Alex Harris (right at podium) could not convince a panel of Genesee County officials to approve his petition language against Flint Mayor Karen Weaver (left)
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

An effort to recall Flint’s mayor has been derailed.

It didn’t take long for the Genesee County Board of Electors to dispatch the petition, maybe two minutes.

The extremely short meeting ended after recall organizer Alex Harris admitted he didn’t have evidence of his first claim against Flint Mayor Karen Weaver that she didn’t pay her water bill.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

We may soon see a draft proposal for how Michigan will handle more than two billion dollars in Medicaid funding earmarked for mental health.

The Snyder administration caused an uproar earlier this year when it backed a plan to further privatize the public nonprofit mental health system by turning over $2.4 billion in state funding to Medicaid HMOs.

Mental Health groups said this would put control of the money into the hands of out-of-state, for-profit insurance companies.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This week, the Genesee County Election Board  will decide whether to approve language for a recall petition against Flint mayor Karen Weaver.

Organizer Alex Harris has run recall efforts against two previous Flint mayors, Woodrow Stanley and Don Williamson. Stanley was recalled.  Williamson stepped down before a recall vote.

Harris himself has run unsuccessfully for seats on the Flint city council and school board.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Monday, some Michigan fast food workers and others are expected to walk out of their minimum wage jobs.

Strikes are planned in Detroit and other Michigan cities, as well as around the country.

Pastor W.J. Rideout is one of the organizers of the D15 campaign pushing for raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour.

“You will see us all over,” says Rideout, “and it’s going to have a great big large impact. It’s going to blow the minds of people.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

If you've ever driven down a pot-hole strewn road, or needed  a filter just to drink your tap water in Flint, you know just how crappy parts of Michigan's infrastructure are right now. 

Now a special commission is expected to deliver a report to the governor next week, outlining what needs to be done to address the state's growing infrastructure needs.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan officials are fighting a court order to start delivering bottled water directly to some Flint homes.

But local activists say that water is needed now, even as the case is appealed to a higher court.

Earlier this month, federal judge David Lawson ordered the state and the city of Flint to deliver cases of bottled water to homes without working water filters.  The filters are needed to screen out lead in the drinking water.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Money talks - and in 2016, it also wins elections. In 91% of state house races this year, the candidate with more money won. 

That's according to analysis by the Michigan Campaign Finance Network. Executive Director Craig Mauger compared the election results with financial reports.  

“In the other 8 races where the candidate...who had less money won, it was often very close.  Both candidates raised a lot of money,” says Mauger.

McLaren Hospital
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Genesee County has recorded its 15th case of Legionnaires Disease of 2016.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services says the latest case of the serious respiratory disease was reported in a male patient at Flint’s McLaren Hospital.

A Genesee County health official says the man is recovering from major surgery unrelated to Legionnaires. 

None of the Legionnaires cases in Genesee County reported this year have been fatal.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A Kansas City-based developer is buying nearly 260 acres of former General Motors land in Lansing.

The vacant land is being sold by the Racer Trust, which is disposing of GM properties separated from the automaker during its 2009 bankruptcy. 

Chad Meyer is the CEO of NorthPoint Development. He says the company plans to redevelop the land for industrial use, but declined to give specifics or a timetable.

“It’s typically [the] more manufacturing investment intensive [the] project is, the longer it takes to get those details worked through,” says Meyer.

Former Ingham County Prosecutor Stuart Dunnings III.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Former Ingham County prosecutor Stuart Dunnings will spend a year in jail for misconduct in office and engaging the services of a prostitute.

He was sentenced today on the misdemeanor charges he pleaded guilty to back in August. Originally, Dunnings was charged with more than a dozen prostitution-related counts.

His arrest earlier this year stemmed from a federal investigation into human trafficking.

Prosecutors say Dunnings paid women for sex over several years.

A Royal Oak middle schooler who admits to placing a noose is a school bathroom will not be in class Monday.

Royal Oak’s school superintendent released a statement Sunday saying the unidentified student admitted to placing a noose inside the middle school bathroom on Friday.

Superintendent Shawn Lewis-Lakin says the district “will not tolerate intimidation, threats, harassment or bullying.” 

Water faucent in Flint.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

This week, delinquent residential water customers in Flint are facing a choice: pay up or their service may be cutoff.

The city of Flint has had some success getting commercial water customers to pay up past due accounts using a carrot and stick approach. Pay up and continue to get a state credit on their bills or risk losing water and sewer service. More than ¾ Flint commercial water customers are now up to date on their water and sewer bills. There are a few, including two apartment complexes, that are facing shutoffs.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Environmental Protection Agency is giving the city of Flint and the state of Michigan until early next year to get its plans in place for switching to the KWA water pipeline.

Eventually, the city of Flint’s tap water will come from the Karegnondi Water Authority pipeline. But the EPA says there are a few things that have to happen first.   

Mistakes made the last time Flint tried treating its own drinking damaged pipes with leached lead into the tap water. 

National Guardsmen delivered bottled water in Flint earlier this year.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The state of Michigan is asking for a stay of a federal court order that bottled water be delivered to Flint homes.

U.S. District Judge David Lawson issued an injunction last week directing the state of Michigan and city of Flint to begin delivering cases of bottled water to city residents without working water filters.     

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Tens of thousands of hunters will soon head into Michigan’s woods for the start of firearm deer season in Michigan. State officials expect a slightly larger deer harvest this year.

Hunters face different challenges in different parts of Michigan: not enough deer in the Upper Peninsula, antler-restrictions in northwest Michigan and chronic-wasting disease in central Michigan.

But Drew Youngedyke, with the Michigan United Conservation Clubs, says the moon may also issue. He says experts predict this week’s brighter than normal moon may change the feeding habits of some deer.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s senior U.S. Senator says there are some things that Congress has to address when it returns to work this week.  

Sen. Debbie Stabenow says her top priority during Congress’ lame duck session will be lining up federal money for Flint.

“We have a promise that was made to me by the Speaker of the House and the Republican Majority Leader that before the end of this year we would pass the money that’s critical to fixing the pipes in Flint,” says Stabenow.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s mayor says the city will do everything it can to abide by a federal judge’s order that bottled water should be delivered to households in need.   

Flint residents have been relying on water from distribution centers for nearly a year, since lead contaminated the city’s tap water. But what has become a daily chore for many in Flint can be too taxing for the elderly and disabled.

Mayor Karen Weaver says the city will reach out to the state for help, though she says bottled water is still only a “temporary fix.”  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The city of Flint is warning its delinquent commercial water customers that it’s time to pay up or risk being shut off.

City workers were out Friday posting shutoff notices on commercial properties with past due accounts.   Apartment complexes are among those getting the notices.

“What these landlords are doing is wrong,” Mayor Karen Weaver says. “Some owners haven’t paid the city of Flint for utility services since 2015.”

The city is trying to avoid shutting off water service which would force renters out.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Across Michigan, people paused to honor the nation’s military veterans.

This morning, veterans fired a volley in honor of those buried at the Great Lakes National Cemetery in Holly.

Several hundred people braved a cold, stiff wind as speakers extolled the virtues of service by the nation’s soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines. 

Retired Col. Kevin Pratt praised the nation’s military who serve in places around the globe.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A U.S. District judge is ordering the government to ensure that every Flint household has safe drinking water. That means home delivery of bottled water.

Federal judge David Lawson issued his order Thursday.

“In modern society, when we turn on a faucet, we expect safe drinking water to flow out,” writes Lawson in his order. “Relief is intended to provide a rough substitute for the essential service that municipal water systems must furnish: delivery of safe drinking water at the point of use.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A spike in foreclosure filings in Michigan is raising eyebrows.

Michigan saw a 38% spike in home foreclosure filings in October over the previous month.

It’s the sharpest month-to-month jump since the foreclosure crisis of the Great Recession.

Daren Blomquist is with Attom Data Solutions. He says it’s too soon to suggest a new foreclosure crisis is brewing.

“We’re actually still below that pre-recession, pre-crisis level in Michigan, even with this jump in October,” says Blomquist.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Medical marijuana growers in Lansing may soon have to register with city, if they use an “excessive” amount of electricity.

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero is proposing an ordinance to require people who continuously use 5000 kilowatts of electricity to register with the city.   

“We have seen a number of cases where the growing equipment used to cultivate medical marijuana overloads the electrical circuits in the home,” says Bernero. “This, of course, creates a fire hazard.”

Marijuana advocates collected more than 300,000 signatures earlier this year, only to have them rejected for failing to meet a state rule on collecting signatures.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan marijuana advocates say legalization may be an “easier sell” after ballot victories in California and other states on Tuesday.

MI-Legalize executive director Jeff Hank is feeling good these days.

“The next election’s already started for us,” Hank says with a laugh.

Voters in Midland cast ballots for Republicans, Democrats and Libertarians on Tuesday.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s Libertarian Party didn’t win many races Tuesday, but the party received more votes than it has in the past.

Libertarian Presidential candidate Gary Johnson picked up nearly 170,000 votes in Michigan. Many local candidates did very well too. Some getting more than 5% of the votes cast in their races.

“These are not wins,” says Bill Gelineau, Michigan’s Libertarian Party chairman. “This doesn’t mean that we’re sitting in the Legislature. But it does mean that we’re becoming a bigger and bigger part of the conversation.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette is tight-lipped about whether his office will join a federal anti-trust probe into the proposed merger of DuPont and Midland-Based Dow Chemical.

Michigan Republicans watch returns Tuesday night.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Tuesday night’s victories came after a contentious year for Michigan’s Republican Party.

Party leaders were sharply divided for months over Donald Trump as their presidential nominee and the direction of the party.

Now State Republican Party Chairman Ronna Romney McDaniel admits this has been a difficult year, her first as state party chair.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Voters in Flint and Lansing approved renewals of their public safety millages.

Flint police chief Tim Johnson says renewing the millage will help expand the number of officers on Flint’s streets.

“For the last probably four or five months, I’ve really been stretching the Flint police officers across the board and I don’t want them to hit no burnout stage,” says Johnson, “but I can see that coming if we don’t get some more officers in there.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Justice Department will monitor the polls in three Michigan cities tomorrow. 

The federal monitors will be in Detroit, Dearborn Heights and Hamtramck.

The Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division plans to deploy more than 500 personnel to 67 jurisdictions in 28 states.

The monitors will be there to enforce federal voting rights laws.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s some mystery about who’s trying to rally support for Libertarian Party candidates in two Michigan state House races.

In recent weeks, fliers promoting the Libertarians starting showing up in mail boxes at homes in the 61st (Portage, MI) and 91st (parts of Muskegon County) districts.   The fliers tout the Libertarians conservative credentials.   But the fliers don’t say who’s behind them. 

"Vote here" sign
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Some Hillary Clinton supporters are trying to convince third party voters in Michigan to “swap” their votes with Democrats in states where the presidential race is not considered close.  

TrumpTraders.org is a website connecting toss-up state Green and Libertarian voters with anti-Donald Trump voters in “safe” states like California.

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