Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.


What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways to Connect

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

State lawmakers are looking at the effectiveness of a Michigan State Police program aimed at reducing violent crime.

Since 2012, through the Secure Cities program, state troopers have helped cities like Detroit and Flint with day-to-day patrol and investigations.

On Wednesday, Capt. Gene Kapp told the state Senate Appropriations Committee the program is working in some of Michigan’s most violent communities.

Photo of Gov. Rick Snyder
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Genesee County health officials insist a court order restricting communication with state health officials is not preventing them from investigating cases of Legionnaires Disease.

The court order is related to the Attorney General’s investigation of the Flint water crisis. 

The Snyder administration is challenging the order.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Two-time Olympic boxing champion Claressa Shields returned home to Flint this afternoon to a hero’s welcome.

“When I say two-time, you all say champ!” Shields yelled, leading her own cheers at Flint’s Bishop Airport, and the crowd willingly followed her lead.

A federal report says improperly treated Flint River water was a “plausible” cause of skin rashes suffered by city residents.

People in Flint have been blaming painful itchy rashes on the city’s tap water. Many pinpoint the development of their skin irritation to the city’s switch to the Flint River as its tap water source. Now a panel of experts for the most part agrees.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Work begins this week on replacing damaged lead service lines in Flint.

There’s also a little science going on as well.

Three contractors hired by the city to replace up to 250 service lines are contacting Flint homeowners to get their permission to do the work.  

Wayne State University researchers will also be contacting the same Flint homeowners to ask if they can test the water before and after the contractors do their work.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Members of Congress remain on their usual summer break.     

Michigan Rep. Dan Kildee hopes money for Flint’s water crisis will be near the top of the agenda when Congress returns to work after Labor Day.

The Flint Democrat admits there are some other pressing needs that also need to be addressed, in particular the Zika outbreak and Opioid epidemic.

“Our effort will be to not get through another budget cycle, as we go into the fall budget deliberations, without addressing Flint,” says Kildee.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint residents are celebrating local hero, boxer Claressa Shields, who won her second gold medal on the final day of the Rio Olympics.

A standing room-only crowd watched Shields’ fight at Flint’s Berston field house, where Shields learned to box.  A picture of Shields wearing her gold medal from the 2012 London Olympics hangs above the front door of the field house.  

All through the middleweight fight, the crowd cheered and Shield’s sister Briana shouted at her to “knock out” her opponent, Nouchka Fontjin of the Netherlands.

Packing up school supplies.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

More than a thousand backpacks are on their way to Flint school children.

This past week, volunteers unloaded a moving van filled with backpacks.

Rhetta Hunyady, with the Flint and Genesee Chamber of Commerce, says they want to get these much-needed school supplies into the hands of children whose parents might not otherwise be able to afford to buy them what they need for school.

“And to let Flint kids know that people here in our community and outside of our community really care about who they are and helping them to be successful,” says Hunyady.

Boy eating popcorn.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint boxer Claressa Shields is one win away from defending her Olympic title.

Flint’s Berston Field House echoed to sounds of Claressa Shields’ fans as she dominated her opponent in Friday’s semi-final.  

The 21-year-old Flint native won a unanimous decision over Dariga Shakimova of Kazakhstan. Shields now faces Nouchka Fontijn of the Netherlands in Sunday’s Gold-medal bout.  

Shields won gold in the 2012 London Games. She can win a second gold medal if she defeats the boxer from the Netherlands on Sunday.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Contractors will soon start replacing lead service lines at more than 200 Flint homes.  But first they need the homeowners’ permission.

The city has hired three companies to fully or partially remove hundreds of service lines.  Representatives of those three companies (WT Stevens Construction Inc., Johnson & Wood Mechanical and Goyette Mechanical) will begin fanning out in specific neighborhoods targeted because their residents are particularly at risk from lead exposure. 

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Six state workers accused of criminal wrongdoing in the Flint Water Crisis are getting their state paychecks once again - and Flint’s mayor is not happy that.

The six suspended state workers are charged with a total of 18 felony charges. They were initially suspended without pay, but their pay was reinstated this week.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver doesn’t think the six should be getting a state paycheck.

“It makes you question what people’s priorities are,” Weaver told reporters today.  

Flint residents paused today to watch local boxer Claressa Shields take to the ring at the Rio Olympics.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint boxer Claressa Shields returned to the Olympic boxing ring today with an overwhelming performance.

The defending Olympic women’s middleweight champion pummeled Russia’s Yaroslava Yakushina to easily win the quarterfinal bout.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Surgeon General says a long-awaited federal study of skin rashes in Flint should be released “very soon”.

Surgeon General Vivek Murthy was in Flint today meeting with local doctors and government officials.

He says they discussed many issues related to Flint’s lead-tainted tap water.

But one issue that remains a major source of controversy and pain is skin rashes.

People in Flint have been complaining about itchy skin rashes for several years.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm is part of the team planning Hillary Clinton’s move into the White House if she wins the presidency in November.

The Clinton campaign announced its White House transition team this morning.

Clinton tapped former U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to lead her White House transition team. Salazar will chair a team that includes Granholm, former National Security Adviser Tom Donilon, and longtime Clinton allies Neera Tanden and Maggie Williams.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing residents will decide in November if they want to renew a public safety and road millage.

The Lansing City Council approved putting the millage renewal on the ballot Monday. 

The millage raises nearly $8 million annually and costs the average Lansing homeowner about $200 a year.

Back in 2011, Lansing voters narrowly approved a millage increase to pay for police and fire, as well as road improvements. Voters had rejected it six months before.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s Democratic Party leader is accusing Republicans of “shielding” Gov. Rick Snyder from accountability for the Flint water crisis.

Brandon Dillon is the Michigan Democratic Party chairman. At the first of a series of news conferences today, Dillon spoke in Flint about the need to not let the governor “off the hook.”

“Anybody, whether they were a state employee or a political appointee right up to the governor himself, need to be held accountable,” Dillon said, “And the Republican Legislature has so far has been shielding him at all costs.”

Congressman Moolenaar said this approval comes at a good time, following the release of a study this month that showed almost twice as many of Flint’s water lines may need to be replaced than originally thought.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

This week, Flint officials hope to ink contracts with three companies to begin removing lead service lines.

The service lines have been a major source of lead in Flint’s drinking water. But of the thousands of lead service lines in the city, to date, only 33 have been replaced.

Final agreements are expected to be signed this week with the companies hired to replace about 250 service lines. Plans are to fully replace 100 lines. Another 150 will involve partial replacement. Homeowners may be notified later this week that their service lines will soon be replaced.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s ongoing water crisis is on the minds of some participants ahead of this week’s Back to the Bricks auto show.

Back to the Bricks is expected to draw up to 500,000 people to downtown Flint to see thousands of classic cars and trucks.

Founder Al Hatch says some car clubs have expressed concern about Flint’s lead tainted tap water. But he’s not worried.  

“Car people don’t come to a car show to drink water,” says Hatch, “If anything, car owners are going to go for an adult beverage.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The federal emergency declaration for the Flint water crisis ends Sunday.

One big change will be who’s paying for all the bottled water and filters being handed out to Flint residents.

The feds have been picking up 75% of the cost, with the state chipping in 25%.  

Now the state will have to pay 100% of the costs. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Officials are asking Michigan utilities to be ready in case there are any problems with getting enough electricity to consumers today.  

The Midcontinent Independent System Operator, or MISO, issued a reliability alert in Michigan after a fire at a DTE power plant overnight.

Flint city council President Kerry Nelson addresses the board overseeing Flint's transition out of receivership.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The panel in charge of Flint’s exit from state oversight says the city council isn't ready yet.

The Receivership Transition Advisory Board has extended the end of council’s probation period from October to December.

The board cites the council’s ongoing conflict with Flint’s mayor over a trash collection contract.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

People in Flint may get good news about about lead tests for their water tomorrow, though many probably won’t believe it.

Thursday morning, researchers from Virginia Tech will release the results of the third round of testing on Flint’s drinking water. The researchers have conducted hundreds of tests on the tap water of the same dozens of Flint homes.

A year ago, the first round revealed the city’s tap water was contaminated with lead. 

The second round of testing conducted earlier this year showed improvement, but levels were still above the federal action level.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A judge has agreed to consolidate the criminal cases against eight defendants related to the Flint water crisis.

Genesee District Judge Tracy Collier-Nix agreed to consolidate the criminal cases.  The cases involve current and former employees with the departments of Environmental Quality and Health and Human Services. The ruling only applies through the preliminary exam phase.

A spokeswoman with the Michigan Attorney General’s office calls the move “procedural”.  AG office spokeswoman Andrea Bitely says, ”All cases were consolidated for judicial economy.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Update: 5:15 pm Monday, August 1st:

On Monday, city officials reached an interim agreement with Republic to resume trash pickup, starting August 2. The arrangement will remain in place until August 12. Officials say trash collection will be delayed by one day for the rest of this week; it should be back on schedule by the start of next week.

A meeting of the Receivership Transition Advisory Board (RTAB) is scheduled for August 10th to decide who will perform trash pickups permanently.

Sunday July 31st:

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The head of Michigan’s state Democratic Party says his party is largely unified coming out of this week’s Democratic National Convention.

State chairman Brandon Dillon spent a lot of time during the four-day convention trying to calm and cajole Bernie Sanders delegates and supporters in Michigan’s delegation, not always successfully.

Still, Dillon says the news media has overstated the number of Sanders backers who plan to bolt the Democratic Party.

"Here's what I know: We have to stop Donald Trump!" former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm told the DNC.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Speaking at last night’s Democratic National Convention, former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm said Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton understands what the U.S. needs. 

“Our next president knows that our nation is a village. That we are one family. And in a family, no one gets left behind,” says Granholm. 

Granholm cited the Flint water crisis as an example. “When Flint’s water poisons its children, it hurts all of us.  These are our children. We are all Flint!” she told the DNC audience.

Henrietta Ivey works two minimum wage jobs and has a hard times making ends meet.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A Detroit home care worker stood in the spotlight at tonight at the Democratic National Convention.

Henrietta Ivey works two minimum wage jobs. She brought her campaign to raise the minimum wage to the main stage at the DNC.

“For me and all home care workers all across America, and my family, this is personal,” says Ivey, “In Michigan, we are ‘fighting for 15.’  A $15 minimum wage and a union … because no working American family should have to be forced to live in poverty.”

Democrats put raising the minimum wage to $15-an-hour in their party platform.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On the final day of the Democratic National Convention, U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders met with Michigan delegates, where he talked about Flint water and Donald Trump.

The crowd in the overflowing hotel ballroom started chanting his name before Bernie Sanders entered.

Sanders delegates and supporters had front row seats and cheered the former presidential candidate several times, though not when he talked about the need to vote for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

The Vermont Senator touched on a few Michigan issues.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Mayor Mike Duggan talked about Detroit’s recovery (and took a shot at Donald Trump) during last night’s Democratic National Convention.

Mayor Duggan used his time at the podium to tout Detroit’s recovery.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s lead tainted drinking water has been a crisis for more than a year.  

Now it’s also national political issue.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver strode to the podium at the Democratic National Convention last night after delegates watched video tracing the history of the crisis dating back to April of 20-14.

Once at the podium, Weaver stated the situation bleakly.

“The problems in Flint are not over,” Weaver told the packed sports arena. “The water is still not safe to drink or cook with from the tap. Our infrastructure is broken, leaking, and rusting away.”