Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
 
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
 
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
 
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
 
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
 
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
 
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
 
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
 
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
 
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
 
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
 
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
 
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
 
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
 
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways To Connect

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

This may be a pivotal week for efforts to get Flint’s mayor’s race back on track.

The state House may vote this week on a bill that would allow Flint to hold an August primary for mayor. 

A screw up by the city clerk meant no candidate filed their petition signatures on time.    

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Flint Institute of Arts is opening its door to city teachers.

It’s been several years since Flint had a comprehensive arts program. 

The FIA is giving more than 400 Flint teachers free family museum memberships. 

Michigan Attorney General's office

A former priest, teacher and wrestling coach at a Michigan Catholic school has been charged with sexually assaulting several boys more than three decades ago.

State Attorney General Bill Schuette says 75-year-old James Rapp was arraigned Thursday in Jackson District Court on 13 counts of criminal sexual conduct.
Schuette says the investigation started in 2013, when two men came forward with allegations of past abuse.

Rapp was assigned to Jackson Lumen Christi High School at the time. He was told to leave in 1987, following allegations a student was molested.

Rapp was sentenced to prison in 1999 for sexually abusing teenage boys in Oklahoma.

He was jailed Thursday pending a June 26 preliminary examination. He’s being held on a $1 million bond.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing Bishop Earl Boyea is calling on Catholics in the mid-Michigan diocese to help the poor. Specifically, he wants them to focus on poor people living in Flint. 

Flint is part of the 10-county diocese. But Boyea feels too many Catholics ignore Flint and its needs.

Decades of economic decline and population flight has left Flint with a poverty rate well above the state average. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

State lawmakers want Flint’s city clerk to get more training and supervision.

Or she can resign or be replaced.   

The demands are part of a bill to let Flint hold a mayoral primary in August. 

The city clerk threw the mayor’s race into chaos when she gave the candidates the wrong filing deadline.

Diocese of Lansing

Lansing Bishop Earl Boyea will be in Flint tomorrow to announce a major outreach by the Catholic Church to poor people in the city.

Faith in Flint is being touted as a “major initiative” to support Catholic Church efforts to help the poor in Flint.

The church’s new effort is part of Pope Francis’s call to focus more attention on the needs of the poor.

Flint has a higher percentage of its population living below the poverty line than the rest of Michigan.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A serious health threat to the state’s wild deer population has been detected in mid-Michigan. 

A six-year-old doe found in Haslett last month has tested positive for chronic wasting disease. 

The neurological disease is always fatal.  The disease is transmitted through saliva and other bodily fluids.   The disease is fatal to deer, elk and moose. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Like many Michigan cities, Saginaw has been struggling to deal with blight and crime. At least in Saginaw, the struggle appears to be paying off.

A study released today finds major crimes (arson, aggravated assault, criminal sexual conduct, homicide, robbery, burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft) decreased 54% between 2005 and 2014. The number is expected to be lower this year. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The clock is ticking for Flint mayoral candidate Eric Mays to find enough validate signatures to guarantee a spot for him on the November ballot.

Flint voters are electing a mayor this fall.     

Councilman Eric Mays fell 48 signatures short of the 900 needed for a spot on the ballot. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

People across Michigan are taking time today to remember those who’ve died serving in the US Armed Forces.

Thousands of people lined the streets in Dearborn for that city’s 91st annual Memorial Day parade. 

Further north in Flint, a much smaller observance of the holiday took place.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero says the city council is “flirting with disaster."

The council voted tonight to override Bernero’s veto of a change the council made to his city budget plan. 

The council rejected the mayor’s desire to hire an inspector general to oversee Lansing’s utility. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new poll shows parents are hesitant to talk to doctors about their children’s behavioral challenges.

Temper, anxiety and concentration can be major behavioral health issues for children. But a new Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health shows a large number of parents don’t talk about it with their pediatricians.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Saginaw fire department faces deep cuts in a proposed budget going before the city council Monday night.

The budget calls for laying off 13 firefighters, reducing the department from 51 to 38 officers. Two of Saginaw’s four fire stations would also close.

An expiring federal grant is the reason for the cuts. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Lansing city council will have to muster six votes to override a mayoral veto when it meets Monday night.

Mayor Virg Bernero issued a veto a few days after the city council passed the city budget for the next fiscal year.

The veto applies to the council’s decision to spend $200,000 to hire an independent firm to audit the Lansing Board of Water & Light.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint police spent part of this past week reaching out to the city’s teenagers.

"It’s all about safety,” Police Chief James Tolbert told students at Flint Southwestern Classical Academy.   Tolbert spoke during a session on things the teenagers can do to avoid trouble.

MOCAD

A unique art exhibition opens this weekend at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit.   When the show closes in August, the main exhibit will have grown.

New York artist Rob Pruitt has been producing a new portrait of Barack Obama every day since the President was inaugurated in 2009. More than 2000 to date and growing by an additional 2 x 2 square foot portrait a day.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

“We have to right-size this school district.”

That’s what outgoing interim Flint schools superintendent Larry Watkins said tonight, after the school district voted to close three more schools.

Closing the three elementary schools will save the district an estimated $7 million over the next seven years.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Wednesday was not an ideal day to plant a garden. 

A chilly day with frost in the forecast overnight. 

But hundreds of people in Flint were more than ready to dig in the dirt.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Oakland County Sheriff Mike Bouchard says politicians in Lansing and Washington are not listening to the needs of law enforcement.

Bouchard says police officers are a popular political target.

“I’m frustrated by the constant peppering of law enforcement from both the Far Right and the Far Left,” says Bouchard. “The Far Right seems to think we’re part of the NSA, and the Far Left wants to disarm us.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan is getting a small share of a multi-million dollar settlement.

Sprint and Verizon have agreed to a $158 million national settlement over unauthorized charges on cell phone bills.

Verizon Wireless has agreed to pay $90 million and Sprint $68 million to settle charges that the mobile giants allowed phony charges on their customers' monthly bills.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Lansing city council has rejected the mayor’s plan to keep a closer eye on the city’s utility. 

The Lansing Board of Water and Light’s management has been making changes since it was heavily criticized for its handling of a major winter snow storm and power outage in 2013.

The Hekmati family

The United States Senate has passed a resolution calling on Iran to release a Flint man.

Amir Hekmati has sat in an Iranian prison cell for more than three years. The former U.S. marine denies the spying charges for which an Iranian court convicted him.

The lawmakers on Monday called on Iran to free Saeed Abedini, Amir Hekmati and Jason Rezaian, and cooperate with the U.S. government to locate and return former FBI agent Robert Levinson, who is believed to be missing in Iran.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Some controversial changes to Lansing’s utility go before the city council Monday.

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero thinks his office should have greater oversight of the Board of Water and Light.

Sue McVey / Flickr

Flint’s games will go on.

Flint school district students have competed against their peers from Hamilton, Ontario for more than a half-century in a variety of sports.

Last year, the financially troubled school district decided to end its funding, putting the future of the games in doubt.

Giggles for Mayor

Flint’s messed-up mayor’s race has taken another bizarre turn.

You don’t normally hear a mayoral candidate threatening to literally eat one of his political rivals on election night. But Flint’s mayor’s race this year is hardly normal.

“I will try to feast on that pig at my victory party. He’ll be invited VIP,” joked city councilman and mayoral candidate Wantwaz Davis. 

Flint attorney Mike Ewing says he decided to launch a write-in campaign to elect “Giggles the Pig” after a screw-up in the Flint city clerk’s office meant all mayoral candidates missed the filing deadline.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan house flippers were busy in first three months of 2015.

In house flipping, homes are bought to be immediately turned around and sold again.  

About 5% of the single-family homes sold in Michigan from January through March were flipped.  Nationally, only 4% of single family homes sold in the first quarter were flipped.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

More than 80 Americorps members will spend part of the next few years helping Flint school children. 

The national service program named Flint as one of ten communities nationwide that will participate in its Operation Americorps. Similar grants have already been announced in New York,  Tucson, Arizona and Pawtucket, Rhode Island. The program combines three different parts of Americorps. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

State lawmakers are taking aim at elk and moose poachers in Michigan.

Lawmakers are considering tripling the fine poachers pay if they are caught illegally killing elk or moose in Michigan. Fines will also rise for bear and eagles.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Tuesday, Flint voters will pick members of a special city charter review commission. There are 13 names on the ballot.  

Mayor Dayne Walling says the nine-member board will have a lot to consider to update Flint’s more than 40-year-old city charter.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Flint mayor’s race is even murkier today.

It appears the one candidate that did file his petitions before a state deadline may not have enough valid signatures.

Other Flint mayoral candidates missed the filing deadline because the city clerk gave them the wrong date.

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