Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.


What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways to Connect

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The division between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in Michigan’s delegation to the Democratic National Convention is getting noticed.

Minnesota Congressman Keith Ellison half-jokingly asked, “Am I in the middle of something?” when several Michigan delegates started arguing in the middle of his speech to the delegation this morning.

Sanders delegates, complaining about the treatment of their candidate by the DNC, and Clinton delegates, growing tired of hearing complaints from Sanders delegates, have grown increasing at odds. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A top state official does not expect divisions over the Democratic Party’s pick for president will affect the party’s chances of winning control of the state house in November.

This could be a pivotal year for the Michigan legislature and who controls the lower chamber. But this is also a presidential election year, with most of the attention focusing on what’s at the top of the ballot.

Michigan helped put Hillary Clinton over the top last night, officially making her the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee.

“The next president of the United States, Hillary Clinton,” U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow said as she delivered Michigan’s official vote at the Democratic National Convention. 

Stabenow says she was overcome by emotion seeing her party choose the first woman to be a major party presidential nominee.   

Clinton delegate Sunny Sahu expects now the divisions within the party can heal.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Former Governor Jennifer Granholm says tonight’s roll call vote will give Bernie Sanders supporters a chance to heal.

Sanders delegates booed the mention of Hillary Clinton’s name during the first day of the Democratic National Convention.

Granholm says the Sanders supporters are dealing with a type of grief one gets when, after passionately backing a candidate, you must deal with their losing the election.  

“They got to take some time to be able to absorb that and see it turn,” Granholm told reporters.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The head of Michigan’s Democratic Party is asking his delegates to not boo speakers at tonight’s Democratic National Convention.

Monday, it seemed whenever Bernie Sanders supporters were booing DNC speakers, television networks panned over to the Michigan delegation. 

Sanders supporters in the Michigan delegation defaced pro-Hillary Clinton signs and heartily booed the mention of her name.

This morning, as the delegation sat down to breakfast, Michigan State Party Chairman Brandon Dillon asked the delegates to be more respectful tonight. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Detroit’s mayor says he plans to strike a very different tone in his speech to the Democratic National Convention this week than the tone at last week’s Republican National Convention.

Mayor Mike Duggan says he was surprised to be asked to speak to the Philadelphia convention.

Duggan says he was “horrified” by Donald Trump’s GOP presidential acceptance speech last week in Cleveland.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Union members have been a key voting demographic in Michigan for decades.

Historically, they’ve been a reliable voting bloc for Democrats. But in 2016, the Trump campaign hopes to change that. 

Hillary Clinton can pretty much write off Joe Kinder’s vote. He’s a retired Ford UAW worker.   

“As far as Clinton goes, she can’t be trusted," says Kinder. "I wouldn’t vote for her."

Kinder, like other members of organized labor, believes the North American Free Trade Agreement, signed by former President Bill Clinton, was a bad deal for American workers.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Tammie Lewis sat in her seat crying as Bernie Sanders finished his speech to the Democratic National Convention last night. Sanders spoke about what the campaign had achieved. Lewis could only think of what she has lost.

“I’m just upset,” Lewis said as tears streamed down her cheeks, “Nothing’s going to change.  He was my only hope."

Other Bernie Sanders delegates from Michigan sat stone-faced as their candidate extolled the virtues of Hillary Clinton.  

Melissa Arab stood holding a pro-Hillary sign she had altered to read STOP HER.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Democratic National Convention starts today.

There are some Michiganders in Philadelphia this week hoping to change the all-but-certain outcome.

A rag tag caravan of cars, vans and campers rolled into the Parvin State Park campground in southern New Jersey just after 10 o’clock Saturday night.

Almost immediately a group of Bernie Sanders supporters picked up guitars and started singing.

The campground in south Jersey is about as far from Philadelphia as these Sanders supporters are from voting for Hillary Clinton in November.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell says Democratic National Committee chairwoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz needed to resign her job. 

Revelations that the DNC under Wasserman-Schultz’ leadership tried to undermine Bernie Sanders’ campaign led to her announcement Sunday to step down.

Dingell says Wasserman-Schultz is a friend, but the Florida congresswoman had to go.

Trump supporters at the RNC
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Republican National Convention is over.  

Now the Trump campaign must gear up for the general election in Michigan.

During the primaries, the Trump campaign operated with a very small staff. But the campaign’s top man in Michigan says that’s changing. 

“We’ll be bringing in a lot of experienced people,” says Scott Hagerstrom, the Trump campaign’s Michigan state director. “As soon as they hit the ground they can hit the ground running.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s Republican leaders are moving on from this week’s national convention with issues to address.

State Party Chairwoman Ronna Romney-McDaniel says support is coalescing around Republican nominee Donald Trump. But she says the refusal of some of Trump’s former rivals to endorse him is a problem. 

“Bush, Kasich and Cruz, those are the ones that are not coming around. I understand it was a tough primary.   But if they don’t lead, it hurts our party,” says Romney-McDaniel. “Hopefully they’ll grow up soon.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Today, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder finally made it to Cleveland, in the final hours of the Republican National Convention.

As a band played “Takin’ Care of Business," Snyder walked around a second floor room in the Cleveland main library, talking to Michigan delegates to the RNC.

Until this event, the Republican governor had not attended any part of his party’s biggest event. Snyder insists he has other priorities in Michigan.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Donald Trump’s strength among white, blue collar, male voters powered him to victory in the Republican primaries, including Michigan’s.

But can expand his hold on this key demographic group?

Wednesday was a sunny day in downtown Cleveland and the food trucks were doing a brisk business. Joseph Albrecht was among those waiting their turn. He works construction. He says he used to have his own business, until Obamacare came along.

Now he’s planning to vote for Donald Trump.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s Ted Cruz supporters liked what their candidate had to say at last night Republican National Convention.

They didn’t like that Donald Trump supporters booed him off the stage.

State Senator Patrick Colbeck sat on the convention floor listening to Cruz as the Texas senator outlined his vision for America, but didn’t endorse Trump.

Republican National Convention
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s House speaker says he doesn’t want the focus on Donald Trump to take away from the Republicans' need to protect their majority in the state House in November.

Republicans hold a nearly 20-seat majority in the state House: 63 Republicans, 45 Democrats and two vacant seats. Some of those seats are in safe Republican districts and others in are safe Democratic districts

But House Speaker Kevin Cotter says 15 to 20 seats may be in play in November’s general election. He says the Republican Party will need to invest its campaign money wisely to maintain its majority.

Sen. Oren Hatch, R-Utah.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A day after Republicans nominated Donald Trump for president, Michigan’s GOP leaders are being urged to rally behind their nominee.

U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, originally backed Jeb Bush. Then Marco Rubio. Now, he’s backing Donald Trump.

Speaking to Michigan’s delegation to the Republican National Convention this morning, Hatch told Michigan’s Republicans it's time they do the same.

“And even if you don’t like Donald Trump, you got to get behind him and do it enthusiastically,” Hatch said, “because guess what the alternative is … it couldn’t be any worse.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

You’ll hear the phrase “build the wall” repeated often during this week’s Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

But it’s that type of rhetoric that may cost the party some votes in Michigan.

Voting for the first time can be intimidating.

So to make it a little easier, a small group of people gathered in a community center gymnasium on Saginaw’s south side recently to vote for their favorite Coney dog.

“So there’s One, two, three hot dogs … coney dogs to choose from,” organizer Debbie Vasquez tells the crowd.

Michigan delegates to the Republican National Convention
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan played a curious role in last night’s confirmation of Donald Trump as the Republican Party’s presidential nominee.

People were scratching their heads after Michigan state Republican Party chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel said this when the roll call of the states reached Michigan:

“Madame Secretary, Michigan passes,”  Romney-McDaniel announced, drawing confused looks by some in the delegation. 

Romney-McDaniel says she was asked, five minutes before Michigan was scheduled to announce how the state’s 59 delegates would vote, to pass.

Michigan's delegates have a good view of the Quicken Loans Arena, not quite as close a view of the main stage itself.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Republicans raising money for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign are hearing the word ‘no’ from some Michigan donors.

Trump’s initial intent to self-fund his campaign, along with his rejection of the party’s establishment, has turned some donors off.

David Nicholson’s family have a long history of donating to Republican candidates.

The family gave thousands to the Jeb Bush and John Kasich campaigns early on.  Nicholson is attending the Republican National Convention as an alternate Kasich delegate,

Gov. John Kasich, R-OH, posed for photos with Michigan delegates after their morning meeting in Akron.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan delegates say they are disappointed Ohio Governor John Kasich did not endorse Donald Trump for president when he met with them today in Akron.

Kasich was among the 16 other Republicans who ran and lost to Trump in the Republican primaries and caucuses.

John Kasich is skipping the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this week.  He is attending a few satellite events like the one this morning with the Michigan delegation in Akron, Ohio. 

  Michigan delegates to the Republican National Convention are focused on picking a presidential nominee.  

But some of them are also thinking about the Michigan governor’s race in 2018.

The house band at the House of Blues played oldies Sunday night while Michigan delegates mixed and mingled.  

The event was one of many during the lead-up to the four-day Republican National Convention in Cleveland. It was hosted by Lt. Gov. Brian Calley.

"This country needs to learn how to pay its bills, protect its borders [and] invite in legal immigrants." Judi Schwalbach said.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Republican leaders insist their party is united, despite Monday’s unrest on the floor of the Republican National Convention.

Anti-Donald Trump forces had collected enough signatures to force a roll call vote on the party’s official rules. But supporters of the presumptive nominee, Donald Trump, circulated a form enabling delegates to remove their names.

GOP officials say delegates from Maine, Minnesota and the District of Columbia pulled their names from petitions calling for a state-by-state roll call vote on the rules. That short-circuited the anti-Trump move.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s drinking water crisis took center stage at the Republican National Convention today, if only for a moment.

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette is the only Michigander scheduled to speak from the podium during the convention’s four-day run at the Quicken Loans Arena.

Gov. Chris Christie, R-NJ, spoke to the Michigan RNC delegation at their hotel in Cuyahoga Falls.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s delegates to the Republican National Convention cheered a former rival to Donald Trump when he called for all Republicans to back the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was an hour late getting to the Michigan delegation meeting at a hotel in Cuyahoga Falls, but his message to the delegates was in tune with the sentiment with most in the room.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

  In Cleveland later this morning, a coalition of Muslim groups plan to hold a news conference to "Challenge the GOP’s  'Politics of Fear'."

Concern about growing islamophobia has led to a push to get more Muslim Michiganders to the polls in November. 

Last month, services at mosques in Michigan were crowded with people observing Ramadan.

On the final Friday of Ramadan, as worshippers gathered at a mosque in Canton, they were greeted by volunteers trying to get them registered to vote.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s Republican delegates get down to work Monday, after spending the weekend partying in Cleveland.

Cleveland has been rocking all weekend with Republican Party parties.

Michigan delegates spent part of Sunday at the House of Blues, a party hosted by Lt. Gov. Brian Calley. But Calley says they’re ready to get started.

“We’re really excited about the energy in the room,” says Calley. “The delegation is ready for this convention to get inspired about this election season so we can win in November.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A Michigan Republican delegate who's trying to stop Donald Trump from getting the nomination at the GOP Convention insists the fight isn’t over.

Wendy Day looks at the “Dump Trump” movement in football terms.

And it’s a game now deep in the fourth quarter.   But it’s a game where the Trump faction has scored all the points.

They have the votes and the convention rules committee blocked an effort to let delegates change their vote.

Still Day isn’t throwing in the towel just yet.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s selection of Indiana Governor Mike Pence as his running mate is getting approving nods from Michigan delegates in Cleveland.

Trump announced his decision over his favorite medium: Twitter.

Work crew replacing a lead service line in Flint.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The city of Flint plans to move ahead with plans to remove more lead service lines.

Pipes connecting homes to city water mains are a prime source of lead in Flint’s drinking water.

But so far, of the thousands of suspect service lines under city streets, only 33 have been replaced. 

Now Mayor Karen Weaver says she’s asking the city council to approve contracts with two Flint companies (Goyette Mechanical and WT Stevens Construction, Inc.) to remove 250 service lines as part of a new pilot program.