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Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
 
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
 
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
 
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
 
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
 
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
 
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
 
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
 
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
 
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
 
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
 
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
 
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
 
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
 
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways to Connect

Michigan State University

Former Detroit Tigers great Kirk Gibson plans to talk about dealing with obstacles when he addresses Michigan State University graduates during commencement ceremonies later today.

“Hopefully I’ll give them some insight in how to deal with that and move on and be productive and accomplish their goals,” says Gibson.

Gibson is facing a major obstacle himself as he battles with Parkinson’s disease.

He was diagnosed with the progressive neurological illness two years ago. 

Doctor's office
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Relieved Republicans have pushed their prized health care bill through the House. The mostly party-line 217-213 vote advances a bill that addresses their longtime pledge to erase the 2010 Obama health care law.

“Today, I voted to keep the promise I made to the voters of my district to rescue Americans from the collapsing health care law that has raised premiums and deductibles and replace it with a better health care system,” says Rep. John Moolenaar, R-Midland.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The state of Michigan has dropped charges against one of the government officials charged in connection with the Flint water crisis.

Mike Glasgow is Flint’s former utilities director. He appeared in court today, where a judge agreed to dismiss a misdemeanor charge against him.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Many Flint residents are upset that the city has started threatening to put liens on homes that are delinquent on their water and sewer bills.

Last month, the city of Flint sent out notices to more than 8,000 water customers.  The notices advise customers to either pay their delinquent water bills, or the city will put a lien on their home.   The delinquent bills amount to nearly $6 million.   

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s been an uptick in money being seized by U.S. Customs officials in Michigan.

U.S. Customs agents at Michigan’s international airports and border crossings have seized $4.4 million since last October. That’s an 8% increase over the same period a year ago.

wind turbines
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

DTE is looking to focus its wind energy development beyond Huron County after voters there rejected proposals to expand the number of wind turbines in their county.

Huron County has more wind turbines that any other county in Michigan. That's thanks to the favorable winds that make that part of the Thumb ideal for wind energy projects.  

But on Tuesday, voters overwhelmingly rejected two proposals to add dozens more. One of the proposals would have let DTE erect up to 70 additional wind turbines.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Auto companies posted their second consecutive monthly sales decline in April.

Some analysts believe this is a sign the automakers’ seven-year winning streak is coming to an end.

Since 2010, Ford, General Motors and other automakers have seen their monthly sales grow and grow. Automakers sold a record 17.55 million vehicles in 2016.  

However, the car companies have been relying more and more on discounts and deals to bring buyers in.   But even that hasn’t been enough lately.

Case in point: April, which was not a good month for the auto companies.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The proposed merger of Midland-based Dow Chemical and DuPont has cleared another regulatory hurdle.

Chinese regulators are giving the merger ‘conditional’ approval.   The condition is DuPont divest some of its research and development department, along with assets tied to pesticides and herbicides used in rice.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

On Tuesday, voters across Michigan will decide whether to renew local taxes that fund public schools.

And voters in one Michigan community will be asked to vote for a millage renewal, that they’ve already rejected twice.

The state closed the Buena Vista school district in 2013.   Its students were divided among three other districts, including Saginaw public schools.

Since then, Buena Vista voters have twice shot down a renewal of a school millage on local businesses.

'Wind farm' takes on a new, and for some uncomfortable' meaning in Huron County
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The future of wind turbines in Huron County goes before voters Tuesday.

The county already has the largest number of turbines in Michigan, with 475 turbines already operating.   

Tuesday’s ballot questions would open the door to another hundred or more.

That’s not what farmer Robert Gaffke wants.  

He raises cattle and sheep on his 200-acre organic farm in Port Hope.    Gaffke doesn’t have any turbines on his property, but says the turbines are slowly spilling across the property line on his neighbor’s land.   The blades make a noticeable wooshing sound.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Marijuana legalization advocates will rally at the state capitol Monday, as they plan to try and get a legalization question on the state's 2018 ballot.   

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new Michigan State University survey finds most Americans remain ignorant of the signs of mental illness and drug use.

The survey found most Americans can't recognize anxiety, don’t know what to do about depression and don’t recognize prescription drug abuse as a treatable problem.

MSU professor Mark Skidmore says, while more education is needed, progress is being made.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The next phase of Flint’s lead pipe replacement gets underway this weekend.

To date, slightly more than 850 service lines have been replaced, as part of the city’s response to pipes leaching lead into Flint’s drinking water.

The goal this year is 6,000.  

“With more work crews in the field starting next week, service lines to 900 homes will be replaced each month, so we’ll really start making progress,” says Flint Mayor Karen Weaver. 

People loading cases of bottled water into an SUV
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

All nine state water distribution sites will remain open for at least another month in Flint.

A settlement of a lawsuit gave the state the option to close two of the sites starting in May.

But Mission Flint spokeswoman Tiffany Brown says the number of people picking up cases of bottled water at each of the sites is still high enough to warrant keeping them open.

Brown says Flint residents would receive plenty of notice if the decision to close one or more the sites is made. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Today, people in Flint marked the anniversary of the start of the city’s drinking water crisis.

It was three years ago, when Flint officials pushed the button switching the city’s tap water source from Detroit to the Flint River.  Improperly treated river water damaged pipes, which then leached lead into the drinking water.

Since then, Flint’s lead-tainted drinking water has drawn national attention and local protests.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Today marks three years since the city of Flint’s drinking water source was switched, creating the city’s lead-tainted tap water crisis.

In a Genesee County courtroom this morning, attorneys representing two former state-appointed emergency managers and two city of Flint employees took part in a court hearing concerning criminal charges against them.

In all, 13 current and former state and city officials face a variety of charges, including neglect of duty and misconduct in office.  Two have agreed to cooperate with prosecutors, in exchange for lesser punishment. 

A gavel
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Three years after they toasted Flint’s ill-fated switch to the Flint River, several former officials will be in court Tuesday.

Former state-appointed emergency managers Darnell Earley and Jerry Ambrose, along with former city officials Howard Croft and Daugherty Johnson, are charged with “false pretense," among other things.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Today, a judge put a recall campaign against Flint’s mayor back on track.

Circuit Court Judge Geoffrey Neithercut says Genesee County election officials were correct when they approved language in a recall petition against Mayor Weaver.    

The petition language cites the mayor signing a contract to hire a new trash hauling company for the city of Flint in response to an 'emergency.' A court later issued an injunction blocking the city from hiring Rizzo Environmental. 

Pre-schoolers playing at a table.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This week, the city of Flint will mark the third anniversary of its ill-fated drinking water switch. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A Genesee County judge is scheduled to hear arguments Monday concerning a recall petition targeting Flint’s mayor.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver has been in office for a year and half.    

There have been several efforts to recall her from office. But so far only one has received the green light from the Genesee County Election Commission.

City of Flint

A program to mow and maintain vacant lots is having a side effect in Flint: lower crime rates in those neighborhoods, including assaults, burglaries and robberies.

A Michigan State University researcher compared crime data to neighborhoods with active “clean and green” abandoned lots. He says his survey of crime stats from 2005 to 2014 shows crime rates decline as “clean and green” lots take hold.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new study shows Michigan’s air quality continues to improve, but the American Lung Association warns those gains could be lost. 

The association’s "State of the Air" report finds ozone and particulate pollution is declining nationally, and in Detroit and Grand Rapids in particular.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This week, Flint Mayor Karen Weaver will outline her plan for the source of her city’s tap water.

On Tuesday, Flint’s mayor will be joined by federal, state and local officials to release her recommendation for the City of Flint’s long-term primary and back-up water sources.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

As the weather gets warmer, health officials in one Michigan County are urging residents to be aware of the danger of Legionnaires' disease.

Legionnaires' disease is a respiratory infection that can turn deadly.

Between 2014 and 2015, 12 people died of Legionnaires in Genesee County.  In all about 90 people fell ill.    Numbers declined sharply in 2016, but the number of cases was still higher than normal.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan health officials are dealing with a second case of measles.

The unidentified adult appears to have contracted the serious viral infection from the first patient. The first patient is a child who lives in southeast Michigan. Both are recovering.

The two are not related. Researchers say the two were passengers on the same international flight last month.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

People walking near part of the Flint River will see, and likely smell, a major dredging project this summer.

About a quarter mile segment of the Flint River will be dredged to remove tons of soil contaminated with coal tar from a gas plant that closed a century ago.    The plant operated from the mid-1800’s to the late 1920’s. Consumers Energy bought the old coal plant back in the 1920’s.   

Jim Innes with the MDEQ is the project manager.    He says coal tar does present a potential health issue for people.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Last night, Gov. Rick Snyder officially opened a new center aimed at increasing business between Michigan and China.

The Michigan-China Innovation Center’s goal is to encourage Chinese companies to invest in Michigan. 

Snyder says he’s met with representatives of several Chinese companies in recent weeks. He sees the trading partnership improving.

“I hope it’s easier in some fashion over the longer term, but we’re seeing a continuation good business flow in both directions,” says Snyder.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

U.S. Sen. Gary Peters (D-MI) wants to see the Trump administration put pressure on Russian President Vladimir Putin over his support of the Syrian government.

Putin criticized last week’s U-S air strike on a Syrian airfield, where a chemical weapons attack was launched on a Syrian city.

The Michigan Democrat says President Trump should pressure his Russian counterpart to drop his support of  Syrian Preisdent Bashar al-Assad, who Peters describes as a “war criminal’.

ZH2 badge
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

U.S. Army officials are touting the potential of a new prototype vehicle from General Motors.

The Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 is powered by a hydrogen fuel cell and is whisper-quiet.  Army officials say it may be especially helpful for special forces in need of a stealthy vehicle.   

U.S. Sen. Gary Peters was on hand as GM officials literally handed over the keys to Army researchers. The Michigan Democrat praises the technology in the vehicle.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A museum dedicated to honoring Michigan women is moving to a new home, near to the food court in a Lansing area shopping mall.

Last week, movers were busy loading cardboard boxes at the Michigan Women’s Historical Center and Hall of Fame.   For 3 decades, the museum has called the Cooley Haze House home.   But the building, overlooking downtown Lansing from its perch next to General Motors Grand River assembly plant, is showing signs of its age. 

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