Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
 
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
 
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
 
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
 
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
 
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
 
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
 
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
 
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
 
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
 
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
 
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
 
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
 
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
 
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways to Connect

Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

A legislative panel investigating the Flint water crisis will hear a report tomorrow about how serious the problem might be in the rest of the state.

The Michigan Infrastructure & Transportation Association and Public Sector Consultants released a report last month on Michigan’s water infrastructure. 

Mike Nystrom with MITA says the report found Michigan is up to a half billion dollars short annually of what it should spend on water infrastructure.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Expanded Medicaid coverage starts in Flint today.

The expanded Medicaid coverage was approved in response to the Flint water crisis.

Medicaid will cover Flint residents up to 21 years old and pregnant women. 

Dr. Eden Wells, Michigan’s Chief Medical Executive, says they’ve been “waiting for this day for a long time.”

“This city’s residents have been exposed to lead in their water,” says Wells, “This requires long-term access to good, comprehensive primary and specialty healthcare.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Time is running out for the petition drive to recall Governor Rick Snyder.

A spokesman says the Stop Snyder petition drive has collected around 400,000 signatures. 

a sink
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The effort to get Flint residents to flush their pipes daily moves into its second week this weekend.

But it’s not known if people are doing it.

“Run your water for five minutes a day. In the kitchen. In the bathroom,” Nicole Lurie told reporters at a news conference this week.  Lurie leads the federal response to Flint’s water crisis.

She says running the water will help flush lead particles out and allow chemicals to get in that will heal the damaged pipes.   

The campaign to get Flint water customers to run their water every day started last Sunday.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report suggests it’s getting harder to get reproductive health care at Michigan hospitals.

A series of hospital mergers in recent years means more hospitals in Michigan are part of a Catholic health system.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Ten community health centers in Michigan are getting million dollar federal grants to expand.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says the money will pay for renovations and expansion. By expanding, the health centers will be able to provide more primary and preventative health services to people with little access.

The department’s Dr. Nicole Lurie toured the Genesee Community Health Center today. What she saw was a center bulging at the seams.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A former Flint city official has agreed to cooperate with federal and state investigations of the city’s water crisis as part of a plea deal. The deal may also shield him from punishment.

Mike Glasgow oversaw the city’s water supply as lead levels rose after Flint switched its tap water source to the Flint River.

He’s one of three officials charged in connection with Flint’s water crisis.  

Glasgow appeared before a judge today.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

President Barack Obama will visit Flint tomorrow to get an update on the city’s drinking water crisis.

In Flint, thousands of children under the age of six have been exposed to high levels of lead in their drinking water, creating problems that could last a lifetime.

But there’s a new effort underway to try to help children most at risk.   

For weeks, teachers and other volunteers have been knocking on doors in Flint.

On Monday, they once again fanned out across a south-side neighborhood.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

An internet giant is stepping in to help Flint with its water crisis.

Google is giving the University of Michigan and U of M-Flint $150,000, through its charitable arm, to develop technological solutions to help Flint deal with medium- and long-term issues tied to the water crisis.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

State health officials are warning of a growing outbreak of salmonella in Michigan.

Since the beginning of March, there have been 20 cases of salmonella in Michigan directly tied to people handling baby chicks and ducklings. Six people ended up in the hospital.   

According to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, symptoms of salmonellosis include diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and abdominal cramps.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The state panel examining Flint's lead tainted water is looking at the pipeline deal that some say was the catalyst of the crisis.

Genesee County Drain Commissioner Jeff Wright walked the panel through the history of the Karegnondi Water Authority pipeline.

Wright believes he answered most questions about why the region needed the new pipeline and why the KWA doesn't deserve any blame for Flint's water crisis.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s a new effort to help Flint school children and teachers deal the stress of the city’s lead tainted drinking water.

Yoga classes were held at two Flint schools last week.

Mark Williams is with Gaia, an organization that promotes Yoga and inner peace.

“You know, as you make your way through life, you have these tools in your back pocket, now you have a chance of succeeding better,” says Williams.

Williams says more yoga outreach efforts are planned.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The state's bottled water distribution operation in Flint is nearing a milestone.

The state will soon open two new community water distribution centers in Flint. Three opened last month. The centers are manned by paid workers. 

MSP Capt. Chris Kelenske leads the state's emergency response to the Flint water crisis. He says as more paid workers come online the National Guard will begin pulling out.

"We’ll continue to see a scaled down version as we’re getting community members hired and brought in,” says Kelenske.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Next month, a secluded treasure in the heart of Flint will open its doors to the general public.

The 100 year old Applewood estate was the home of Charles Stewart Mott, an auto industry pioneer and philanthropist.   The estate sits a short distance from Flint’s cultural district.

For decades, only the fortunate few had the chance to enter.

“It is a great Flint treasure that has been somewhat under-utilized,” says Megan McAdow, the Collections & Exhibitions Manager for the Ruth Mott Foundation.

However, that’s changing.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s top civil rights officials held their first a public hearing on the Flint water crisis today.

Dozens of Flint residents told their stories to the Michigan Civil Rights Commission.

“This is not a black or white thing,” Flint resident Tony Palladino testified, “because this water is killing all of us.”

Other speakers complained about racism, water rates, real estate red-lining, and Gov. Rick Snyder.

The commissioners noted a task force set up by Gov. Snyder called Flint’s water crisis an example of “environmental injustice."

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s a push on to get more young kids in the Flint area signed up for early childhood education programs.

The state Legislature approved special funding to expand early childhood education programs in Genesee County, as part of the state’s response to Flint’s lead-tainted drinking water.

Lisa Hagel is the superintendent of the Genesee Intermediate School District. She says many three- and four-year-olds would benefit from the education and nutrition program, but they don’t know where those kids are.

money
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s U.S. senators are trying again to get $172 million in federal funding for fixing Flint’s damaged water system. 

Senators Gary Peters and Debbie Stabenow announced today they have included the money in the Water Resources Development Act. The U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee is expected to consider this legislation this week.

Stabenow, D-Mich, says she’s glad they’ve “found a new path forward to get urgently-needed help for families in Flint and other communities across the country with serious lead and water issues.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Flint police department is taking a more aggressive stance on crime.

Standing before a conference table piled high with guns, drugs and $18,000 cash, Flint Police Chief Timothy Johnson says a new unit has spent the past few weeks cracking down on street crime.

“This would have been on the streets if it wouldn’t have been for the efforts of the Crime Area Target team,” says Johnson. “There’s probably a lot more out there than we have on this table. I’m quite sure it is.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

“They poisoned the wrong city, everybody!” one speaker shouted at today’s rally at Flint city hall to mark the second anniversary of the city’s mishandled switch to its namesake river as its drinking water source.

In 2014, the city started getting its tap water from the Flint River as part of plan to save the city millions of dollars. But the river water was not properly treated with anti-corrosives. As a result, the corrosive river water damaged city pipes, which continue to leach lead into the drinking water. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A group of Flint water activists is starting a new charity to help people not reached by government and other groups.

Organizer Lee Anne Walters says Community Development Organization’s first priority will be to help people who find they can’t pay medical bills tied to Flint’s lead tainted drinking water.

“It’s something that needs to be done. It’s a great need in the community. And so this is where we feel we fit best right now,” says Walters. 

Walters says their initial goal is to raise $1 million, though she admits the need is much greater.

On April 25, 2014, Flint officials toasted each other as they flipped the switch to the Flint River.
WNEM-TV

Today marks the second anniversary of Flint’s ill-fated switch to the Flint River for the city’s drinking water source.

The river water was not properly treated with anti-corrosive chemicals, and the highly corrosive river water damaged pipes and fixtures, which continue to leach lead into the city’s drinking water. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A governor’s task force is urging state lawmakers to approve more money to deal with the Flint water crisis.

The Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee approved a resolution during its weekly meeting today, asking Michigan lawmakers to speed up the budget process.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

State officials want Flint’s elected leaders to make a decision “soon” as to whether the city will hook up to the new KWA pipeline.

But city officials say there are questions that need to be answered first.

Construction of the new Karegnondi Water Authority pipeline from Lake Huron to Genesee County should be complete this summer. But more work must be done to connect the city to the new pipeline and that may take months. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Members of Michigan’s congressional delegation see today’s criminal charges as just a step in the right direction.

On a conference call with reporters, U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint, welcomed the filing of criminal charges against two state regulators and a Flint city employee in the Flint water crisis.

“But it would be incomplete if that justice did not also include those who did this to Flint … meaning the state government,” says Kildee.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s Attorney General is making what his office is calling a “significant” announcement in his Flint water investigation Wednesday

It's expected criminal charges will be announced.

Attorney General Bill Schuette launched the investigation three months ago into whether any state laws were broken in the Flint water crisis.

A series of decisions designed to save money by switching Flint’s drinking water source resulted in the city’s pipes being damaged. The pipes continue to leach lead into the city of 100 thousand’s drinking water. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A federal judge may have dealt a serious blow to people suing over the Flint water crisis.

U.S. District judge John Corbett O’Meara dismissed the class-action suit after finding the claims made by Flint residents couldn’t be resolved in federal court. 

At issue are claims made by the plaintiffs in the case that their constitutional rights and state law were violated by being required to pay for water that turned out to be tainted with lead. They believed that would fall under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver is “not impressed” by Governor Snyder’s pledge to drink only Flint water for the next 30 days. 

The governor made the pledge to drink filtered Flint water yesterday.

“I’m going to start drinking that tonight and do that for the next 30 days … when I’m at work and at home,” Snyder told reporters on Monday. The governor says he wants to be a “role model” to show filtered Flint tap water is safe to drink.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan State University researchers are predicting a good year ahead for the state’s tourism industry.

MSU’s Sarah Nicholls predicts a 3% increase in tourist traffic, and a 5% increase in spending.

Nicholls says Michigan tourism has rebounded well from the Great Recession, with year-over-year tourism spending up between 2-3% each year over a 4-5 year period.  

“Back in 2009, hotel occupancy across the state was around 48%. We’re now back up to 60%,” says Nicholls.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Governor Rick Snyder is pledging to drink filtered Flint tap water for the next 30 days. 

People in Flint don’t trust that special filters are enough to clean lead from their tap water. In many homes, the level of lead in unfiltered tap water is well above the federal action level of 15 parts per billion. 

In Flint today, the governor encouraged city residents to trust the filters. Snyder says he filled up several gallon jugs today at a home with a lead service line that has tested above the federal action level for lead in the past.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder does not appear to like a state Senate plan to close two prisons and lease a private prison.  

A Senate subcommittee approved the plan last week as a way to save $15 million.  

Snyder asks,“If you’re closing prisons, why lease another?”

“I view this as part of the normal budget process…..that wasn’t part of our budget recommendation,” Snyder told reporters.

Senators are proposing closing prisons to save money as Michigan’s prison population declines.  

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