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Auchter's Art: Our immigration laws are out of whack with our nation's ideals

Jan 19, 2018

On Monday this week, while our nation celebrated the life and principles of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., immigration officials were actively deporting a family man from Lincoln Park, Michigan.

Jorge Garcia came to America 30 years ago when he was a 10 year-old boy, brought by undocumented family members. He built his life here: a wife and two teenage children (all US citizens), a home, a career as a landscaper, and a law-abiding, tax-paying member of the community.

The last piece of that American Dream puzzle was full citizenship, which he pursued for years spending $125,000 in legal costs. But it wasn't enough to keep him from being deported.

You can read a full story from the Detroit Free Press here.

Many people would consider this story a tragedy.

Many others would certainly not feel great about it, but point to the fact that the law is the law.

(A few lost all empathy at reading the Hispanic name "Jorge Garcia." Let's just leave them out of this.)

The issue then is one of alignment.

Are we a nation that exemplifies Reagan's "Shining City upon a Hill" or are we a nation of dedicated rule followers?

Well, in fact, we are both. And we need to be both.

Well, in fact, we are both. And we need to be both.

We need to have ideals and virtues and lofty goals. We also need to respect the rules and laws we have created. But they need to align.

And clearly in Mr. Garcia's case, we are way out of alignment.

The laws need to be updated so we can say we are the best nation in the world and actually be the best nation in the world.

It's deeply unfortunate that every worthwhile movement in our nation's history seems to require martyrs. Dr. King certainly was one for the civil rights movement.

Mr. Garcia and his family now find themselves candidates for the immigration reform movement.

Let's pray that a brief separation is all that is required from them to achieve reform.

John Auchter is an independent, freelance cartoonist. His views do not necessarily represent those of Michigan Radio, its management, or its license holder, the University of Michigan.