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Auchter's Art: These policies look awfully familiar

Aug 11, 2017

I've been observing this game of Michigan politics long enough now that I can definitely detect patterns. 

This is quite useful for editorial cartooning, but makes me insufferable at cocktail parties:

"...and so those are just a few of my many observations regarding governmental paradigm shifts in post-industrial Midwestern states. Wait, where are you going? I have more keen insights to share! You shouldn't gulp your drink like that!! Why are you running?!!!"

Fortunately for other people, I don't go to cocktail parties.

One pattern is that governors from Blanchard to Engler to Granholm and now Snyder end up trying to land the big fish. Despite whatever good intentions they might have had at first for growing the economy (investment in education and infrastructure for Democrats, reducing barriers and fostering small-business growth for Republicans), they all fall for the seduction of the mega-deals that promise thousands and thousands of jobs. I'm guessing it feels like an opportunity for a legacy.

Often, however, the legacy is not a good legacy — especially for the mega-deals because they take a lot of tax money (credits, abatements, packages) to make them happen. It's really difficult to tell whether they are worthwhile. In Wisconsin, Governor Scott Walker is trying to pull off a deal with Foxconn to build an LCD screen factory by offering $3 billion in incentives. The payback (assuming all goes well) would be in (wait for it) 25 years!

Okay, maybe the deals Governor Snyder wants to cut will turn out fine. But the language he's using is very similar to the language Governor Granholm was using a decade ago. And didn't Snyder originally run on a platform to get state government out of "picking winners and losers"? I guess it's hard to remember that stuff when you're concentrating on landing that big fish.

John Auchter is an editorial cartoonist. Views expressed in his cartoons are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of Michigan Radio, its management or the station licensee, The University of Michigan.