Details of the $46.7 million in federal transit money coming to Michigan

Oct 18, 2011

We reported last week about the federal money coming to the state, and Sarah Hulett reported on more details released yesterday.

In case you missed it, here's how the $46.7 million from Federal Transit Administration’s Alternatives Analysis, Bus Livability, and State of Good Repair grant program is broken up in Michigan:

  • $2 million to the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments - to study transit options in a 5.9-mile section of the Woodward Avenue corridor between Eight Mile and Fifteen Mile Roads.
  • $6.9 million to the Blue Water Area Transportation Commission - to replace the existing Quay Street Transfer Center with one that is more centrally located in downtown Port Huron. The project will consolidate the transfer center over a smaller area. 
  • $4 million to the Capital Area Transit Authority - to repair and replace aging buses in its fleet.
  • $2 million to the Macatawa Area Express Transportation Authority - to replace its aging bus facility with a new energy efficient facility.
  • $6 million to the Thunder Bay Transportation Authority - for phases one and two of a new administration and maintenance facility. A new circulation and ventilation system is planned for this facility to reduce the harmful emissions from the diesel bus fleet.
  • $746,770 to the Michigan Department of Transportation - for public transportation bus equipment projects across the state in rural and small urban areas.
  • $8.2 million - to the Mass Transportation Authority in Flint - to purchase hybrid buses to replace city buses. $3 million of the $8.2 million will go toward replacing commuter buses with CNG coaches.
  • $3.8 million - to the Ann Arbor Transportation Authority - to purchase clean diesel buses with hybrid-electric components to increase bus service along the Washtenaw Avenue Corridor. $1.2 million of the $3.8 million will go toward studying transit alternatives in the 8.5-mile crescent-shaped corridor extending from northeast Ann Arbor through the University of Michigan (UM) North and Central Campus, through the UM South Campus to Briarwood Mall near I-94. 
  • $607,200 - to the City of Grand Haven/Harbor Transit - to purchase additional vehicles to allow the expansion of service into a nearby township not currently served by transit. 
  • $5 million - to the Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation - to replace buses in its fleet with hybrid biodiesel/electric buses. 
  • $6.8 million - to the City of Detroit Department of Transportation - $6 million to replace buses, $518,291 to rehabilitate a number of buildings at its Coolidge Terminal, and $320,000 to develop an asset management system that will more effectively track the condition of its fleet, facilities and equipment.
  • $600,000 - to the Interurban Transit Partnership - to study the 12-mile Allendale corridor along Lake Michigan Drive/M-45 connecting the Grand Valley State University Allendale campus, the Standale/downtown Walker area, the GVSU Pew Campus, and downtown Grand Rapids.

Of the eight Great Lakes states, New York received a bigger share of the $928.5 million awarded in total by the federal government's transportation grant program.

Here are the totals  for the states in our region:

  1. New York - $164.1 million
  2. Pennsylvania - $67.2 million
  3. Illinois - $53.1 million
  4. Michigan - $46.7 million
  5. Wisconsin - $20.0 million
  6. Ohio - $12.3 million
  7. Minnesota - $10.6 million
  8. Indiana - $6.5 million