In this morning's news...

Aug 25, 2011

Lawmakers Busy in Lansing

The state Legislature has approved a measure that would mean higher health care costs for some teachers and local government employees. “The bill would require local governments to pay no more than 80 percent of their employee health care costs, or limit the payment to $15,000 a year per family.  The measure now heads to Governor Snyder for his signature,” Laura Weber reports.  State lawmakers also gave final approval to legislation that would create stricter welfare limits. The Associated Press reports:

Residents involved in roughly 12,500 welfare cases in Michigan could lose benefits under a stricter, four-year lifetime limit… The welfare limit already has been approved as part of the state budget that kicks in Oct. 1. Lawmakers plan to put the cap in a separate state statute to help implement the budget plan. The state's current four-year limit on welfare benefits would expire Sept. 30 unless the Legislature revises or extends the limitations. The revised welfare limits have fewer exemptions than the four-year limit now in state law.

Medical Marijuana No Longer Legal?

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette says he'll inform the state's 83 county prosecutors about a court decision that bans the commercial sale of medical marijuana, the Associated Press reports. From the AP:

Schuette says the appeals court ruling empowers local authorities to shut down marijuana dispensaries. The businesses typically allow people with medical marijuana cards to sell pot to others who also have cards. The appeals court said Wednesday that such shops are illegal. Schuette says it's a victory for people who don't want pot dispensaries in their communities.

Home Prices Continue Slide

Michigan home prices are still sliding, thanks to banks selling foreclosed homes and short-selling others. “Realty Trac reports 40 percent of all home sales in Michigan between April and June involved banks either selling foreclosed homes or short-selling other homes that were on the verge of being repossessed. That percentage is up slightly from the beginning of the year and the same time last year,” Steve Carmody reports.