In this morning's news...

Dec 13, 2011

Detroit Stops Paying Some Bills

In order to fund its payroll, Detroit has delayed paying some of its vendors and contractors, the Associated Press reports. From the AP:

City Council President Pro Tem Gary Brown told the Detroit Free Press… that the delays allow the city to fund its payroll…  Mayor Dave Bing's office acknowledged that it's delaying some payments but says the intention is to fully compensate everyone. Bing has said Detroit faces a $150 million budget deficit and a projected $45 million cash shortfall... Michigan Treasury officials have started a preliminary review of Detroit's finances, a possible first step to an emergency manager's appointment.

Snyder Doesn’t Want ‘Right-to-Work’

Governor Rick Snyder says he is still against right-to-work laws in Michigan. The Governor told WJR radio that, “he doesn't want to repeat the experiences of Wisconsin and Ohio, where anti-union measures have been extremely divisive.Snyder says Michigan has taken steps to encourage job growth that will be more useful than a right-to-work law, such as significantly cutting business taxes effective Jan. 1. He adds many of the new jobs being created in Michigan aren't in unionized industries anyway,” the Associated Press reports.

Lawmakers Face To-Do List as Year Wraps Up

A fight could be brewing at the state Capitol over funding an exchange that would allow people and businesses to comparison-shop for health insurance, Laura Weber reports. From Weber:

The state is supposed to create the exchange as part of the new federal health care overhaul requirements. Republicans have debated whether funding the health insurance exchange would be showing support for the new federal health care law. Republican state Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville says it’s one of a handful of pressing questions that should be settled this week before the Legislature begins a month-long winter break. The Legislature is also still debating whether to allow more K-12 charter schools, and whether to overhaul the state’s workers compensation rules. And a lingering question remains whether the state House will vote to dramatically alter Michigan’s no-fault insurance laws.