In this morning's news...

Jan 6, 2012

ACLU Files Suit

The American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan has filed suit against Governor Snyder over the state’s new law that bans domestic partner benefits. Sarah Cwiek reports:

Snyder signed the controversial law just before Christmas. It prohibits school districts, counties and other public employers from extending health insurance coverage to employees’ unmarried domestic partners. State universities are exempt. The ACLU filed suit on behalf of four couples. The group says the ban is 'wrong, discriminatory, and unconstitutional' because it singles out gays and lesbians. A federal Appeals Court struck down a similar Arizona law recently. Snyder and other backers say the law is just another in a series of measures to address 'the spiraling costs of health care.'

Detroit Budget

With a state financial review underway for the city of Detroit, Mayor Dave Bing yesterday unveiled a new ‘financial and operational restricting plan.' “It highlights cost savings from 1,000 imminent layoffs, overdue payments from the Detroit Public Schools district and a corporate tax increase that Bing says will mitigate a cash shortfall,” the Associated Press notes. And, Michigan Radio’s Sarah Hulett explains, “The mayor’s plan includes $360 million in savings over the next year and a half. But some city council members  say they’re skeptical. The mayor plans to present his proposal to a state review team next week. That review team could recommend an emergency manager take over the city finances.”

NAIAS to Stay in Detroit... For Now

The North American International Auto Show will remain in Detroit for the next five years. “The deal signed today by auto show and Cobo Center officials should reverse years of suggestions that show sponsors might take their business elsewhere,” Sarah Hulett reports. “A regional authority took control of Cobo away from the city two years ago. The move paved the way a $278 million renovation of the aging facility. The auto dealers who put on the show had warned the city could lose the auto show if renovations were not made,” Hulett explains. The auto show opens to the public January 14.