Oakland Co. asks judge to put Detroit water dept. in hands of regional committee

Jan 27, 2011

Update January 27, 4:18 p.m.:


 


Detroit Mayor Dave Bing says it’s “ludicrous” to suggest that the city give up control of its massive water system.


Legislation at the state Capitol, and a motion filed this week in federal court, would do just that.


Mayor Bing says he plans to examine the system’s problems, and he plans to fix them.



"I’m not here to defend past practices. I’m not here to defend the management, on a historical basis. My job here today is to look forward."


Bing says people think Detroit is in a weak position, and they’re trying to take advantage of that.


 


Update January 27th, 8:24 a.m.:


Wayne County Executive Robert A. Ficano has issued the following statement regarding the current situation with the DWSB:

"Today, we met as regional leaders to discuss Mayor Bing's plans for DWSD. It was a very productive meeting, containing very open and pointed discussion of the serious challenges within the department.  I am disappointed in the filing by the Oakland County Drain Commissioner, as this action contradicts the spirit of the discussion earlier today.


I believe in giving the Mayor an opportunity to explore the current operation, correct the mistakes and practices by the previous administration, and allow him to move forward and put in place accountable, transparent operation.


I believe now is not the time to be divisive, but to work cooperatively."


January 26th, 6:10 p.m.:


Oakland County is asking a federal judge to create a regional committee to oversee Detroit’s massive water system. It’s the latest development in a long-running dispute between the city and the suburbs over the scandal-plagued department.


John McCullough is the Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner. He says some $200 million are expected to be spent upgrading the system in the coming year.



"And since 60 percent of these corrections are going to be paid for by suburban customers, it really provides an effective way of the entire region to weigh in as to the proposed solutions and how those costs will be addressed."


The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department has been under federal oversight since the late 1970s because of Clean Water Act violations.


Late last year,the Justice Department identified 13 scams in which water department contracts worth tens of millions of dollars were allegedly steered to a friend of Detroit’s former mayor, Kwame Kilpatrick.