Politics & Culture
5:02 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Stateside for Monday, November 18th, 2013

When we talk about Detroit's bankruptcy filing, the point seems to almost always be made that this is historic. That Detroit is the largest city in U.S. history to seek bankruptcy protection. But, that was almost not the case. In the mid 1970's New York City was on the brink of financial crisis. On today's show: What can Detroit learn from New York's comeback?

And, as of today, the University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers will no longer sell sugar-sweetened drinks. It's a not-too-subtle push to get healthy, but is it taking away our choice as a consumer? Is it going too far?

Also, the Michigan Women's Hall of Fame has just announced its latest list of inductees. We took a closer look at one of these influential Michigan women.

First on the show, Republicans in Lansing are split over whether people who bankroll so-called “issue ads” should be allowed to remain anonymous.

Issue ads attack or support politicians or causes without using what are called “magic words" like “vote for” or "oppose." Unlike campaign ads, the money behind issue ads can be anonymous.

But, late last week, Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson proposed new rules that would require disclosure of issue-ad donations.

Johnson said, too often, issue ads are just thinly disguised political ads, and people should know who is paying for them.

But, many Republicans disagree. In fact, within hours of Johnson's proposal, the GOP-led Senate acted quickly to amend a campaign finance bill that would make Johnson's new rules illegal.

Rich Robinson, Executive Director of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network, and Jonathan Oosting, Capitol reporter for MLive.com, joined us today.