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Morning Edition

Weekday mornings from 5:00 - 9:00 a.m.

Every morning on Michigan Radio, Doug Tribou hosts NPR's Morning Edition, the most listened-to news radio program in the country. The show brings listeners up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, interviews and coverage of arts and sports. Heard regularly on Morning Edition are many familiar voices in public radio, including news analyst Cokie Roberts, Michigan Radio's Jack Lessenberry, and sports commentator John U. Bacon, as well as special features like It's Just Politics and StoryCorps

Person on bicycle riding in an urban area.
Thomas Hawk / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A few weeks ago in Portage a pickup driver struck a cyclist from behind. The cyclist died. That case has Michigan’s bicycling community thinking of another crash that happened in August 2016. That's when a driver tried to pass another car on a rural road west of Ann Arbor, but hit and killed triathlete Karen McKeachie who was riding a bicycle in the opposite direction.

flooded street in Midland
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

As people in Texas and Louisiana struggle to deal with the impact of Harvey, the storm is also generating new conversations about how to deal with flooding in other parts of the country.

Mid-Michigan is still recovering from floods in late June, and many Michigan cities have had problems in recent years.

Rush our traffic on US-23
YouTube Screen grab / MDOT

For most people, a speeding ticket means a grumpy day and a painful check to put in the mail. But for Michigan drivers, it often means paying the original ticket, plus another fee assessed by the state.

Depending on the violation, that fee can be assessed more than once over a number of years, and those fees can snowball. Right now, more than 317,000 Michiganders owe an average of around $1,800 in driver responsibility fees. If they can’t pay up, they risk having their driver's license suspended.

sign that says "vote here"
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Radio Morning Edition Host Doug Tribou and Senior News Analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the results of yesterday's primary elections in Detroit, Flint and Pontiac. 

child holds onto a fence that surrounds a refugee camp
User Jordi Bernabeu Farrús / Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A small group of children fleeing violence in their home countries is stuck in limbo. They've been paired with American foster families, including some in Michigan.

But they can't come to the U.S. because of President Donald Trump's revised travel ban, which affects people from six predominantly Muslim countries and temporarily bans all refugees. 

The children are part of the unaccompanied refugee minor program, which was created in the 1980s to help thousands of displaced children from Southeast Asia. 

aerial shot of buildings, soccer stadium
Rossetti

Wayne County is a step closer to letting its unfinished jail in Detroit become a $1 billion development that would include a pro soccer stadium. The county is working to finalize details with businessman Dan Gilbert. In exchange for the jail site, Gilbert would construct a new criminal justice center near I-75 in the city.

Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the deal and whether major league soccer would be successful in Detroit. 

buildings in downtown detroit
Flickr user ifmuth

The riots of July 1967 are not at the root of the problems that lead to Detroit’s decline. However, they do provide an exclamation point in the much larger story about the struggles the city has now faced for decades, including unemployment, poverty and decaying infrastructure.

For our series, "Summer of Rebellion," Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with Wayne State University professor Robin Boyle about the legacy of that time period. Boyle has taught urban planning at Wayne State University for the past 25 years. He's also done extensive research on the Detroit and other Midwestern cities dealing with population declines. 

Black and white shot of destroyed buildings in Detroit in 1967.
The Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library

As part of our series, "Summer of Rebellion," Michigan Radio Senior News Analyst Jack Lessenberry shares his memories of the unrest in Detroit in July 1967 with Morning Edition host Doug Tribou. They also discuss the role that week's events played in Detroit's larger decline.

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Almost everyone agrees that good teachers are important for our children. However, how those teachers should be compensated can lead to heated debates. Take, for example, the one that just happened over the new teacher retirement system approved in the latest state budget.

Michigan Radio’s Jennifer Guerra is taking an in-depth look at how we go about paying teachers in Michigan and what it means for teacher performance and retention in the state. 

Capitol Building in Lansing, MI
Matthileo / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A group called Voters Not Politicians is trying to get a question about gerrymandering on the 2018 statewide ballot. Gerrymandering refers to the process of drawing voting districts to favor certain politicians or populations. Their plan would create a 13-member citizens panel to oversee redistricting. It would be made up of five independent voters, four Democrats, and four Republicans. 

Senior political analyst Jack Lessenberry talks to Morning Edition host Doug Tribou about how this ballot initiative could change current voting districts.

black and white photo of people rioting in downtown Detroit
Walter P. Reuther Library: Wayne State University

Describing events is tricky business. It’s something we do a lot in the news, and one word can completely change the tone of a story. 

Michigan Radio is marking the 50th anniversary of the unrest that happened in Detroit with a two-week series on "Morning Edition" and "Stateside." But what do we – and should we – call the events of 1967? And how do those choices affect our view of this important part of Michigan’s history?

An artists' vision of Little Caesars Arena.
Olympia Entertainment

Last month, Detroit city council approved $34.5 million in bonds to help pay for the Pistons move to Little Caesars Arena. That property-tax money would have gone to schools, but will now be reimbursed to the teams' owners. Now, the NBA and the companies that own the Detroit Pistons and Red Wings have been added to a federal lawsuit against Detroit's public school district.

Activist Robert Davis filed the lawsuit. He says Detroiters should've been allowed to vote on how their tax money is used. Senior political analyst Jack Lessenberry tells "Morning Edition" host Doug Tribou whether he thinks Davis has a chance of winning the case. 


exterior of kalamazoo county courthouse
Charles W. Chapman / Wikimedia Commons, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en

More than 1,800 rape kits had gone untested when the state attorney general’s office announced the results of a survey last year. That survey included all of the counties in Michigan except Wayne County. Last month, Kalamazoo County tested 194 rape kits. Some of them were 30 years old.  The testing cost the county $144,000 in state funds.

Michael Dorausch / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Trump administration has created a commission to investigate allegations of voter fraud. States have been asked for detailed voter information. Michigan's Secretary of State Ruth Johnson says she'll comply with some of the requests, but will not send Michiganders' personal information.  “Morning Edition” host Doug Tribou and senior political analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss Johnson’s response to the request.


all terrain vehicle driving on dirt road
ATVist / CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)

Many Michiganders are about to head up north for a long holiday weekend. When they arrive, some travelers will use public land for hiking, biking, horseback riding and driving off-road vehicles or ORVs. Fans of ORVs will soon have a lot more options. Thousands of miles of state forest roads are about to open up to them in the northern part of the Lower Peninsula.

A road sign says "Share the road."
Flicker user Richard Drdul / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

While preparing for our "Sharing the Road" series, we asked Michigan Radio listeners to share some of their thoughts about improving bike safety in the state.

car and bicyclist riding side by side in the road
Flicker user Richard Masoner / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

This week marks the anniversary of the crash that left five bicyclists dead in Kalamazoo County. In 2016, a total of 38 cyclists in Michigan lost their lives in crashes involving motor vehicles. That's a 10-year high, according to state data.

Spartan stadium
Flickr/Ken Lund / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Three Michigan State University football players have been charged with sexual assault stemming from an incident in January in which they allegedly sexually assaulted a woman on campus. 

Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior political analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the this case and others, including former Olympic gymnastics and MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar.

Man in bike gear standing with bike
Photo by Chris Fry Gobble / Courtesy of Paul Gobble

One year ago today, nine bicyclists headed out for a 28-mile ride in Kalamazoo County. They were part of the Chain Gang – a group that has been organizing weekly rides since 1999. 

Person on bicycle riding in an urban area.
Thomas Hawk / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Tomorrow marks the anniversary of the crash in Kalamazoo County that left five bicyclists dead and four others seriously injured. The riders were all members of the Chain Gang, a group that organizes weekly rides in and around Kalamazoo. 

flickr

For the first time since he's been governor, the leaders from the state House and Senate have signed a target budget agreement without Rick Snyder's input. House Speaker Tom Leonard and Senate Majority Leader Arlan Meekhof want to close the pension system for new Michigan teachers and only offer a 401k. Governor Snyder's not a fan of that idea.

lower half of gymnast on balance beam
Flickr user James Thomas / Creative Commons

Former Olympic gymnastics and Michigan State University sports doctor Larry Nassar will be back in district court in Mason today. He'll face some of the women and girls who claim he sexually abused them while he was supposed to be treating their injuries.

satellite map of Michigan, the Great Lakes
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

The Trump Administration released its proposed federal budget. The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative would get zero dollars if the plan is approved as is. Over the past seven years, it received $2.2 billion in funding to preserve the Great Lakes.

Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss how that cut could affect Michigan residents.

Michigan still has one of the highest rates of juvenile lifers in the country.
Thomas Hawk / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A Senate subcommittee has passed a budget cutting the Department of Corrections' budget by $40 million. The department says that would mean cutting jobs and programs to fight recidivism. Both Republicans and Democrats want to see lower prison populations.

Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss whether this plan could get bi-partisan support.

female softball player getting ready to pitch
Library of Congress / Public Domain

Softball teams from the Big Ten, including Michigan State and the University of Michigan, open their conference tournament in Ann Arbor today.

Next month, thousands of fans will attend the NCAA Women’s College World Series in Oklahoma City. In 2020, softball will return to the Olympics after a 12-year-hiatus.

It’s a far cry from softball’s early days when top female and male players often had to move to find a company-sponsored team with a travel budget so they could play in a big tournament.

exterior of the Michigan state capital
Pkay Chelle / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

On May 9, State Representative John Kivela was found dead in a Lansing home from an apparent suicide. The Marquette democrat's death marks the third time in the past year a House member has died. Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss reactions from the Michigan State House. 

Car accident
Daniel X. O'Neil/Flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

If you’re a driver in Michigan, it's not exactly breaking news to hear that our auto insurance rates are some of the highest in the country. Drivers in Detroit pay the most. One study estimated an average of $3,400 annually. By comparison, the national average is about $900.

Vintage postcard "Greetings from Grand Haven, Michigan."
Boston Public Library Tichnor Brothers collection / Wikimedia Commons

This time of year a lot of people start thinking about summer vacations. If you’re like many Michiganders, when you’re planning a week or two off, you might find a cottage or a beach house to rent online. Airbnb, VRBO and HomeAway are a few of the most popular short-term rental websites.

University of Michigan Professor Rosina Bierbaum says scandals like Flint's water crisis have eroded public trust in the safety of drinking water
Courtesy of Raiz Up

Three years ago this week, officials switched Flint's water source to the Flint River, sparking the water crisis there. The river wasn't properly treated, and began corroding lead water pipes, which then leached lead into the drinking water.

Senior News Analyst Jack Lessenberry talks to Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou about why it took the city so long to listen to residents' concerns. 

Detroit Public Schools Community District sign
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

The Detroit Public Schools Community District school board has chosen Nikolai Vitti as its first permanent superintendent. Vitti grew up in Dearborn Heights and is currently the superintendent in Duval County, Florida.

Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and Senior News Analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss what the district's new pick means for Detroit schools. 

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