Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Politics & Culture
5:10 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, April 10, 2014

The average gas mileage of new vehicles sold in the U.S. has steadily been improving, and greenhouse gas emissions are at an all-time low. The Environmental Protection Agency also recently set new emissions standards, scheduled to be phased in between 2017 and 2025, that will reduce the amount of sulfur found in gasoline.

But is the slow and steady climb in fuel economy and emissions enough? On today’s show, we ask if the Obama administration's 2016 and 2025 fuel efficiency goals setting the bar too low?

Then, a new documentary film brings us the story of the Great Lakes as seen through its ice.

And, last month, Gov. Snyder confirmed a financial emergency existed in Royal Oak Township. Can other communities learn from Royal Oak’s situation?

Also, the Share Art Project is a collaborative effort among artists at the Buckham Gallery, students and the Genesee Valley Regional Center. We spoke to a Buckham board member about the program and an upcoming exhibit.

First on the show, there have been two big developments this week in the high-stakes showdown over Detroit's pensioners, its art treasures and creditors, who hope bankruptcy judge Steven Rhodes will pressure the city to put those art treasures on the table.

There's a lot to try to sort out. So, as we do each Thursday, we spoke to Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes.

Stateside
5:09 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

New documentary explores why ice is important to the Great Lakes

Executive producer and director Bill Kleinert.
Credit Facebook

Those of us who live in Michigan grow up with an ingrained awareness of the Great Lakes. We drink their water, sail and swim in them, build homes and cottages on their shorelines, and live with the weather they help produce.

The Great Lakes are an economic power-player. They contribute one trillion dollars to America's gross national product. And let's not overlook that $4 billion Great Lakes fishing industry.

A new documentary film brings us a unique look at the Great Lakes. PROJECT: ICE explores the crucial role that ice has played and continues to play in shaping and maintaining Michigan's most important resource.

The executive producer and director of PROJECT: ICE, Bill Kleinert, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

*Support for Arts and culture coverage on Stateside comes in part from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Stateside
6:02 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

"The Joe's" days as the home of the Detroit Red Wings are numbered

For the past 35 years, "Hockeytown" in Detroit has meant the on Detroit's Riverfront.  But " The Joe's" days as the home of the Detroit Red Wings are numbered.

The Wings are headed north to the Cass Corridor area between downtown at Midtown.

A new $450-million, 18,000 seat arena is on the way for Wings owner Mike Ilitch,  perhaps as early as the 2016-2017 season.

And what's drawing fire from critics like my next guest is the fact that the stadium deal has the public covering nearly 60% of the sticker price the Ilitches will get all the revenues from the new stadium, and the whole deal was unveiled publicly the week after Detroit declared bankruptcy.

Bill Bradley is a columnist at Next City, where he covers economic development in cities. He dug into the new Wings arena in a piece for nextcity.org. It's title? "Red Wings Stadium Upset! Why Taxpayers are Losing--Again--in Detroit."

Stateside
5:50 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, April 9, 2014

A new $450-million hockey arena is on the way for the Red Wings in Detroit. Sixty percent of it is being paid for by taxpayers.

Will that investment from the city pay off? And what lessons can we learn from other similar deals around the nation?

And we talk about diversity on college campuses. Are mixed-race students counted?

Also, raising the federal minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 an hour, and closing the pay gap between men and women; those are key parts of the 2014 midterm election campaign for Democrats.

Stateside
5:40 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Fruit farmers all over Michigan are getting an idea of what winter has done to orchards

Credit user tami.vroma / Flickr

With winter finally behind us, hopefully fruit farmers all over Michigan are getting an idea of what the snow, ice and cold has done to orchards, vineyards and fields.

Knowing that the early spring warm-up of 2012 was devastating to most of Michigan's fruit-growers, we wondered if the rough winter has them just as worried now as they were two years ago.

Ken Nye of the Michigan Farm Bureau joined us.

Listen to the full interview above.

Made in Michigan
8:45 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Carhartt got its start in Michigan, and stayed in Michigan

Carhartt was made in Michigan.
Credit Carhartt / Facebook

Carhartt got its start in southern Michigan when the company's founder, Hamilton Carhartt, set out to make the best pair of overalls he could for railroad workers.

The company is still family owned and remains in Michigan.

We spoke with the company's current CEO, Mark Valade. He's Hamilton Carhartt's great-grandson.

Listen to our interview with him above.

Stateside
8:14 am
Wed April 9, 2014

U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow talks minimum wage and the gender pay gap

U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow
Credit USDAgov / Flickr

Sen. Stabenow talks about the gender pay gap.

Raising the federal minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 an hour, and closing the pay gap between men and women; those are key parts of the 2014 midterm election campaign for Democrats.

Michigan has one of the biggest gender-based pay gaps in the nation. That's according to a new report by the National Partnership for Women and Families. 

The study says women who work full-time in Michigan earn 74 cents for every dollar men make. While some say the gap isn't that big, it's clear that women are often paid less than men.  We spoke with U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow, who co-sponsored a bill that sought to address the gender pay gap. The U.S. Senate voted down that bill after our interview with Stabenow. Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
8:05 am
Wed April 9, 2014

How do institutions go about counting "diversity"?

When it comes to diversity, who counts?

That's the challenging question raised by my next guest in a piece she wrote for the Huffington Post.

Borne out of some important insights that dawned on her as she stood in front of a class and really listened to her students.

Martha Jones is a professor of history, law, Afro-American and African studies at the University of Michigan.

We spoke with her about her piece.

Listen to the interview above.

Stateside
7:59 am
Wed April 9, 2014

How Michigan stacks up when it comes to elections

Credit Flickr

How is Michigan doing on the elections front? Click on the link to listen.

The Pew Charitable Trusts' latest Elections Performance Index looked at all 50 states and the District of Columbia to measure how well they conducted their elections. Wait times at polling stations, problems with registration or absentee ballots, and voter turnout were just some of the things examined.

So how did Michigan do? We talked to Sean Greene, research manager for The Pew Charitable Trusts, to find out.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:10 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Unmarried women voters may be crucial in the upcoming fall elections

Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

As Michigan's August 5 primary and November election draw closer, there are some very tight races shaping up.

The Cook Political Report says four congressional Republicans are in tight races. Representatives Dan Benishek in the 1st, Tim Walberg in the 7th, Justin Amash in the 3rd and Kerry Bentivolio on the 11th districts are in very competitive races. Add to that the race to fill Democrat Carl Levin's Senate seat and the race for governor. All of these, according to Cook, are among the most competitive races in the country.

So who are the voters who could most influence the outcome of these races, depending upon whether they stay home or go to the polls?

For the answer we turned to Page Gardner, president of the non-profit and nonpartisan Voter Participation Center. She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:10 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Stateside for Tuesday, April 8, 2014

A former Republican state representative says he was on the "wrong side of history" when he opposed same-sex marriage during his time in Lansing 10 years ago. On today's show, Chris Ward, former representative from Genoa County talked about the gay marriage ban and the future of the Republican Party.

Then, we spoke with a very talented Flint rapper about his music and raising the profile of the Flint community.

We heard from writer Deidre Stevens about the Ca-Choo Club, a very unique way to attract allergy sufferers to Sault Ste. Marie.

Also, as Michigan's Aug. 5 primary and November election draw closer, there are some very tight races shaping up. Who are the voters who could most influence the outcome of these races, depending upon whether they stay home or go to the polls?

First on the show, yesterday was the deadline to file objections to the disclosure statement spelling out Detroit's plan to climb out of its bankruptcy hole.

And yes, objections poured in – long lists of objections to the disclosure statement.

Detroit News reporter Chad Livengood joined us today to tell us who's objecting, why, and what comes next.

Stateside
3:50 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Flint singer/songwriter Tunde Olaniran creates fresh new music

Tunde Olaniran and Cynthia Canty in the studio.
Credit Facebook

An interview with Flint artist Tunde Olaniran.

Don't make the mistake of thinking that fresh new music – rap, electronic and more – comes out of Detroit.

Listen to what's coming out of Flint.

Tunde Olaniran is a Flint artist: singer, songwriter, rapper, electropop, rock. Tunde is attracting lots of attention, including a glowing review in the New York Times for his new EP, Yung Archetype.

Tunde Olaniran joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:50 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Who objected to Detroit's disclosure statement?

Yesterday was the deadline to file objections to the disclosure statement spelling out Detroit's plan to climb out of its bankruptcy hole.

And yes, objections poured in – long lists of objections to the disclosure statement.

Detroit News reporter Chad Livengood joined us today to tell us who's objecting, why, and what comes next.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:49 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

The fresh air of Sault Ste. Marie once made it a popular destination for allergy sufferers

The Soo Locks in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.
Credit USACOE

We've been hearing from the experts that, thanks to the great winter and our friend the polar vortex, this is going to be quite a year for allergy sufferers.

Perhaps it might be time to revive The Ca-Choo Club.

The Ca-Choo Club was a very unique way to attract visitors to Sault Ste. Marie.

Beginning in 1928, it welcomed allergy sufferers who turned up to breathe that clean, cool, pollen-free air that swept in off Lake Superior.

Writer Deidre Stevens dug into the history of this quirky Ca-Choo Club for Michigan History magazine, and she joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
2:37 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Former Republican state representative says he was wrong to oppose same-sex marriage

Chris Ward in a photo for a 2008 cover story in Dome Magazine.
Credit Dave Trumpie - trumpiephotography.com / Dome Magazine

Former Michigan State Rep. Chris Ward talks about why he regrets his vote on same-sex marriage.

It is never too late to offer a public "mea culpa" for taking a political action that you later believe was a serious mistake.

That's the idea behind a recent entry on the blog Republicus.

Former Republican State Rep. Chris Ward wrote the post declaring that he'd been on the "wrong side of history" when he opposed same-sex marriage during his time in Lansing.

Read more
Politics & Culture
5:53 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Stateside for Monday, April 7, 2014

House Republicans have come up with an annual $500 million solution to fixing Michigan's horrible damaged roads. Kathleen Gray of the Detroit Free Press joins us to discuss the proposition. 

A Clinton Township man was senselessly beaten and robbed on Detroit's east side after stopping to help a 10-year-old boy who stepped into oncoming traffic. Steve Utash is now in a medically induced coma. Rochelle Riley of the Detroit Free Press joins us to try and understand this crime. 

A neighborhood church in Metro Detroit has closed its doors about 91 years. St. Henry's parish numbers have fallen so low that the church is closing. Stateside's Kyle Norris grew up attending the church, and she joins us today to share her story.

Read more
Investigative
5:43 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Clinton Township man remains in coma after severe beating

Steve Utash was attacked on Detroit's East Side.
Credit Peter Martorano / Flickr

A Clinton Township tree trimmer is still in a medically induced coma today. He was beaten by a mob on Detroit's east side after he stopped to help a child who had stepped into the path of his truck. 

Detroit Police say Steve Utash was not at fault, that he'd been obeying the speed limit. And after 10-year-old David Harris stepped out in front of his pickup truck, Utash did the right thing: He got out to help the boy. 

That's when he was attacked by the mob who beat him severely and robbed his truck. 

Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley joins us now to try to make sense of this seemingly senseless crime.

Listen to the full interview above.

Economy
5:42 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Northern Michigan faces a labor shortage

The Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island could face labor shortages.
Credit David Ball / creative commons

As we salute spring and bid a none-too-fond farewell to the snow and sub-zero temps, you may be making your plans to visit Northern Michigan. 

And that is where businesses like Mackinac Island's Grand Hotel, other resorts, golf courses, restaurants and marinas are facing the challenge of a labor shortage. 

Ken Winter wrote about the problem recently for Dome Magazine. He'll tell us why it's such a problem for Northern Michigan Hospitality businesses, like the Grand Hotel, to find enough workers.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Economy
5:41 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

The Arab American News examines small business ownership

Arab American restaurants and businesses in Dearborn, Michigan.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

As the city of Detroit seeks pathways back to economic health, small businesses are seen as a key. And there can be no conversation about small business owners in Detroit without involving the Arab-American community. 

Most of the grocery stores, convenience stores and gas stations in Detroit are owned by Arab-Americans.

And, historically, the relationship between these store owners and their largely African-American customers has been not without its tensions. 

Which is why a recent editorial in The Arab American News caught our eye, and we wanted to share its message with you. 

We're joined now by Osama Siblani, the publisher of The Arab American News.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Environment & Science
5:35 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Michigan's maple syrup farming is sweet for the economy

A maple tree is tapped for syrup.
Credit mi-maplesyrup.com

The first farm crop to be harvested in Michigan is ready. 

Michigan ranks number five in maple syrup production each year, and according to the Michigan Maple Syrup Association, that sweet syrup helps pump nearly $2.5 million into Michigan's economy each year.

But there are plenty of maple trees in Michigan that are not being tapped. So we wondered, if we have all these trees, why aren't more people making maple syrup?

Michael Farrell's book is called The Sugar Makers Companion: An Integrated Approach to Producing Syrup from Maple, Birch, and Walnut Trees.

Farrell joins us today.

Listen to the full interview above. 

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