Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Food
3:52 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

A morel mushroom recipe from a café in Cadillac

Morel mushrooms spring from the ground in Michigan.
Credit State of Michigan

Listen to Chef Hermann Suhs cooking up morels in his kitchen at Hermann's European Café in Cadillac, Michigan.

This audio postcard was produced by Tom Carr.

Here's the recipe for "Fettuccine Morello a la Chef Hermann"

Ingredients:

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Stateside
7:32 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

New study shows drivers don't trust connected vehicles

A few years ago, most of us would not know what the phrase "connected vehicles" meant. Today, the technology is being used in more vehicles, in hopes of cutting down on accidents and traffic jams. 

A new study from the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute finds that even as the public welcomes the prospect of safer driving, they are still worried about being hacked and preserving their privacy. 

We were joined by the researchers who conducted this study. 

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
7:29 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Tecumseh Brewing Company is MILE's first crowdfunding success

Tecumseh's downtown historic district.
Credit user: Notorious4Life / Wikipedia

There's no shortage of talk about issues that divide our state lawmakers, so let's focus on something that virtually every lawmaker agreed was good for Michigan: our intrastate investment crowdfunding law. 

It zipped through the state House and Senate with just one "no" vote and was signed into law late last year by Gov. Rick Snyder. All of that happened in just four months. 

It's called the Michigan Invests Locally Exemption (MILE). It's a way of providing capital to existing and start-up businesses. We talked about this new intrastate crowd funding law a couple of months ago here on Stateside. 

Today, we look the first success story from MILE – the first business to reach its crowd funding campaign goal. 

The Tecumseh Brewing Company used MILE to crowdfund its way to $175,000. 

Kyle Dewitt is the co-founder of the Tecumseh Brewing Company  and Chris Miller is the coordinator of the Downtown Development Authority and Economic Development in Adrian. They joined us on Stateside today.

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Politics & Government
7:24 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Hearings continue for Detroit recovery plan

Credit user: {megan} / Flickr

The newly-formed state House committee on Detroit's recovery and Michigan's future continued its hearings today.

At stake is exactly what the state's role should be in helping Detroit out of bankruptcy, and whether the state will kick in $195 million to the "grand bargain" to shore up pensions and protect the city's art collection. 

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes, joined us. 

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
7:20 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Rouge Rescue seeks volunteers for annual river cleanup

An aerial photo of the River Rouge.
Credit Library of Congress

If you ever want proof that individual actions can make a big difference in our environment, look no further than the Rouge Rescue – the yearly cleanup organized by the Friends of the Rouge River

Since 1986, the volunteers of Friends of the Rouge River have been working to protect and improve the river. Right now they're in the midst of the annual Rouge Rescue, and looking for willing helping hands. 

Cyndi Ross, the program manager of Friends of the Rouge River, joined us. 

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Politics & Culture
9:45 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, May 14, 2014

A power company wants to bury low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste less than a mile away from Lake Huron in Kincardine, Ontario.

Now a scientist who once worked for the nuclear waste facility is speaking out. He says some of the materials that would be stored underground are hundreds of times more radioactive than what was told to governmental officials. What do these new findings mean for the Kincardine project and the Great Lakes?

Then vintage trailer fans from around the country are heading to Camp Dearborn this weekend for the Tin Can Tourists' Annual Gathering. We talk travel trailers with them later in the show.

But first, we check in on Congressman John Conyers. He turns 85 this Friday, and the ballot snafu is likely not the birthday gift that Congressman Conyers would have wished for.

He’ll be filing an appeal with the state after yesterday's announcement by Wayne County Clerk Cathy Garrett that he did not have enough valid signatures on his nominating petitions to be on the August primary ballot.

Garrett says only 592 of the necessary 1,000 signatures are valid. Many signatures were disqualified because the people collecting the signatures were not registered voters. According to law, that voids the signatures they collected.

If his appeal to the state fails, Conyers is talking about mounting a write-in campaign for the primary.

All of this has those who have watched John Conyers since he was first elected to Congress in 1964 thinking about his "epic journey" through the decades, and what an ending to a career this could be.

Michigan Radio's political commentator Jack Lessenberry joined us today to talk about this.

Stateside
9:43 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

"Tin Can Tourists" hold 17th annual gathering in Michigan

A 1954 Spartan Royal Manor.
Credit Tin Can Tourists / Pinterest

They call themselves the Tin Can Tourists. They're folks who celebrate the travel trailer – the vintage travel trailers – the kind that grandma and grandpa might have used.

This weekend the Tin Can Tourists are holding their 17th annual gathering at Camp Dearborn in Milford.

Forrest Bone is the head of the Tin Can Tourists. And he told us today that his group actually dates back to 1919.

*Listen to our interview with above.

Stateside
9:43 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

U of M's Ross School of Business holding "Positive Business Conference" this week

UM's Ross School of Business.
Credit UM

Words of encouragement, like “think positive,” can be flung around with little thought when we face challenging situations.

It's something we hear so often that it's easy to tune out.

But there is real power in those words: The power to make our workplaces better and more effective.

This week, The Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan is holding its first-ever Ross Positive Business Conference.

Chris White leads the Center for Positive Organizations at the University of Michigan, and he joined us today.

*Listen to our interview with above.

Stateside
9:29 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Jack Lessenberry weighs in on the John Conyers ballot snafu

Congressman John Conyers.
Credit Photography Courtesy of www.conyers.house.gov

Congressman John Conyers turns 85 on Friday, but a petition-gathering snafu is likely not the birthday gift Conyers would have wished for.

He’ll be filing an appeal with the state after yesterday's announcement by Wayne County Clerk Cathy Garrett that Conyers did not have enough valid signatures on his nominating petitions to be on the August primary ballot.

Garrett says only 592 of the necessary 1,000 signatures are valid. Many signatures were disqualified because the people collecting the signatures were not registered voters. According to law, that voids the signatures they collected.

If his appeal to the state fails, Conyers is talking about mounting a write-in campaign for the primary.

All of this has those who have watched John Conyers since he was first elected to Congress in 1964 thinking about his "epic journey" through the decades, and what an ending to a career this could be.

Michigan Radio's political commentator Jack Lessenberry joined us today to talk about this.

*Listen to the interview above.

Arts & Culture
5:19 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Detroit's Eastern Market still one of the top authentic urban experiences in the U.S.

Credit Lester Graham Michigan Radio

It's one of the most authentic urban experiences in the country: Detroit's Eastern Market.

These days, the Eastern Market is a six-block area just east of downtown Detroit, and it's been feeding people since 1891.

But there's a much longer history of public markets in Detroit. We spoke with food historian Bill Loomis, who wrote about this for Michigan History Magazine.

Stateside
5:15 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

How do Brighton schools deal with severe weather?

Credit user doodlepress / creative commons

Emergency sirens sounded across much of Southeast Michigan during thunderstorm and tornado warnings yesterday, just as many schools were letting students out for the day. This caused  some parents to wonder: What’s being done with my kid?

We talked with Greg Gray, the superintendent of Brighton Area Schools, about how the district dealt with Monday's severe weather.

Stateside
5:05 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Michigan is running out of money to loan to struggling schools

The Muskegon Heights school district is one system that has experienced "severe financial stress." They received more than $12 million from this loan board.

There's a state law that gives a special board up to $50 million that can be loaned to struggling school districts.

The long-term, low-interest loans are supposed to help these districts restructure and pay down their debt.

But this emergency loan board has already given out $48 million. That’s 97% of the money that was supposed to last until 2018.

How did this happen? And is there a way for struggling school districts to get back on their feet without needing an emergency manager or having to ask for another loan?

Jeff Guilfoyle with Public Sector Consultants joined us today to talk about this problem.

*Listen to the interview below.

Politics & Culture
4:32 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Stateside for Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Stateside for Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Things aren't going so hot when it comes to school finances in Michigan.

The state has basically run out of money to loan to struggling schools through 2018. The reason is because so many districts need help.

Today, we'll hear how we got to this point and what could be done to change the way schools use and receive state funds.

Then young people are not only driving less than teens did a generation ago, they aren't even getting licenses. We'll find out what driving less means for the auto industry and the future of how we get around.

First up, Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr was in Lansing today. He testified before the newly-formed House Committee on Detroit's Recovery and Michigan's Future. 

*Listen to the program above.

Stateside
4:24 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

New poll shows majority think Detroit is on the wrong track

A new poll reveals how Michiganders feel about helping Detroit's financial recovery.
Credit user: {megan} / Flickr

New polling out just this morning sheds some light on how folks who live outside of Detroit feel about this possible settlement, in which money would go from Lansing to Detroit.

As part of the Detroit Journalism Cooperative, Michigan Radio's Lester Graham and Sarah Cwiek have been poring over the results of our Epic MRA poll. They joined us to discuss how people feel about the state giving money to help Detroit's recovery. 

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:23 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Bills propose that Michigan will contribute $195 million to Detroit

A House committee is debating a package of bills in which the state would contribute millions to Detroit.
Credit JSFauxtaugraphy/Flickr

Detroit emergency manager Kevyn Orr was in Lansing today. He testified before the newly-formed House committee on Detroit's recovery and Michigan's future. 

The committee will begin debate on the package of bills that would have the state contributing close to $195 million to the city. 

With Detroit's bankruptcy heading toward a July trial over Orr's plan to eliminate the city's debt, state lawmakers are fast-tracking the package of bills. They hope to get the bills to the House floor for a vote as early as next week, and eventually onto the governor's desk by early June.

MLive Capitol reporter Jonathan Oosting was at today's session, and he joined us from Lansing. 

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Made In Michigan
3:16 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Gerber has roots in Michigan

Gerber baby food fill the shelves of most baby food aisles.
Credit user: ParentingPatch / Wikipedia

One of the longest lasting durable brands on the store shelves in America is Gerber. 

Its Michigan's roots have been strong since the very beginning, in the town of Fremont.

The Gerber family came to Michigan in the mid-1870s, and by 1928 they began manufacturing baby food under the name Gerber Products Company. 

Aileen Stocks, head of integrated marketing for Gerber, joined us today to explore the company's Michigan roots.

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Politics & Culture
3:47 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Stateside for Monday, May 12, 2014

The Severstal steel plant complex in Dearborn has been cited 37 times for violating its current state air quality permit. Now the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality says it had set some standards too high. Two Detroit lawmakers have asked the EPA to step in.

Today, we heard more about what the recent permitting process could mean for the people who live around the Severstal facility.

And we checked in with the veterans and dog lovers who have joined forces to honor the state's war dogs.

Also, there is all sorts of political news coming out of Lansing and Detroit - from the political fate of a long-time Michigan Congressman - to a political move by a top Republican to derail a ballot proposal boosting Michigan's minimum wage - and news on that perennial Michigan topic: repairing potholed, crumbling roads.

So much political news that Michigan Radio’s It’s Just Politics hosts joined us - Rick Pluta and Zoe Clark.

Stateside
2:54 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

State news broken down by the It's Just Politics team

The It's Just Politics team joined Stateside to break down some state news.

There's all sorts of political news coming out of Lansing and Detroit this week, from the political fate of a long-time Michigan congressman, to a political move by a top Republican lawmaker to derail a ballot proposal boosting Michigan's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. And of course, there is news on that perennial Michigan topic of fixing our potholed, crumbling roads. 

There's so much political news that we decided to bring in Michigan Radio's "It's Just Politics" team of Rick Pluta and Zoe Clark to sort it all out for us. 

*Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
2:29 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Flint's emergency manager proposes cuts to police, firefighters

Firefighters are among those who could lose their jobs in Flint.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint's state-appointed emergency manager is proposing a $55 million budget that would cut 36 police officer positions and 19 firefighter jobs. 

Darnell Earley's two-year budget plan also includes higher fees for property owners for street lighting, garbage pickup and water and sewer service. 

Dayne Walling, the mayor of Flint, joined us today. 

*Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
2:25 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Detroit Free Press reporter investigates how state agency lobbied for Severstal

Severstal's Ore Yard.

It was June 2012 when Gov. Rick Snyder and Michael Finney, the CEO of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, attended a ceremony at the Severstal steel plant in Dearborn. 

The two spoke with the CEO of the steel plant, Sergei Kuznetsov. 

A Detroit Free Press investigation raises questions about what happened after that conversation in the summer of 2012. 

The Michigan Economic Development Corp., Gov. Rick Snyder's business-promoting agency, worked for months behind the scenes with one of the state's most flagrantly polluting businesses as the company lobbied the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality for permission to release even higher levels of pollutants and avoid current air quality regulations, DEQ e-mails obtained by the Free Press show.

Keith Matheny, a writer for the Detroit Free Press, joined us to talk about the investigation. 

*Listen to the full interview above. 

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