Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Stateside
4:59 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

The Michigan Women's Hall of Fame has some new inductees

Elizabeth “Bessie” Eaglesfield
The Greater Grand Rapids Women's History Council

The Michigan Women's Hall of Fame has just announced its latest list of inductees. Among them are six contemporary women and three women from Michigan's past.

We took a closer look at one of those women from the past. Elizabeth Eaglesfield broke ground as one of the first female lawyers in Michigan history, but she didn't stop there. 

Just wait till you hear more about her remarkable life and career.

Joining us was Jo Ellyn Clarey of the Greater Grand Rapids Women's History Council, who nominated Elizabeth Eaglesfield.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:43 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, November 14th, 2013

Great Lakes states average about a 30% rate of recycling. Michigan's recycling rate is somewhere around 14%. We talk about why Michigan is lagging when it comes to recycling.

 And we speak to a former aid in the Nixon administration who has a new idea for a political party. Also, it's Thursday and that means it's time for our weekly check-in with Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes. He's been busy digging up a story that could prove to have a major impact on the future of the DIA, the future of Detroit's retired workers, and the future of the bankruptcy proceedings.

Stateside
4:32 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Will "issue ads" be subject to campaign finance laws in Michigan?

Michigan's Secretary of State is proposing an end to secretly funded political ads.

Republican Ruth Johnson proposed a new rule today to require sponsors of so-called "issue ads" to file reports with the state and meet current campaign finance requirements. Currently, ads only urging voters to support or oppose a specific candidate are subject to disclosure requirements. Issue ads define a candidate's suitability for office without directly urging a "yes" or a "no" vote, and they're exempt from disclosure requirements. Chris Gautz, Capitol Correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business, joined us today.

Read more
Stateside
4:28 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Why do we have the lowest recycling rate in the Great Lakes region?

A recycling sorter.
skatebiker Wikimedia Commons

The state’s paltry recycling numbers have caught the attention of Gov. Rick Snyder, who’s pinpointing recycling as a top priority. The Department of Environmental Quality is trying to come up with a proposal to expand recycling in Michigan.

“If we could accomplish our 50 percent recycling goal, the value of that material if diverted from the landfill is about $500 million dollars a year,” said Kerrin O'Brien, the executive director of the Michigan Recycling Coalition.

O’Brien talked to us in the studio along with Barry Rabe, professor of Environmental Policy at the University of Michigan, where he directs the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy.

Click on the audio link above to listen to the full interview.

Stateside
4:20 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Could a private fund save both the DIA and public pensions?

The Detroit Institute of Arts
Flickr

If anything’s clear coming from Detroit’s bankruptcy case it is this: the city needs new solutions.

Daniel Howes, Detroit News business columnist, wrote his column today on a proposal from Chief U.S. District Judge Gerald Rosen. Rosen is proposing a new private fund that could have a major impact on the future of the Detroit Institute of Arts, the city’s retired workers and bankruptcy proceedings.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:32 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, November 13, 2013

On the show today, a surprising new study shows binge drinking is up among high school students, and that's not all. It's a rising problem across the Midwest.

 Then, a very personal story from a filmmaker who overcame being a bully, and how her mission to educate kids and parents resulted in a powerful film. And, we took a look at Michigan House Speaker Jase Bolger's visit to Detroit and what he learned while there. 

First on the show, As Detroit's troubles and "dirty laundry" have been aired out on a world-wide stage, there has been plenty of finger-pointing and judging of the city's leaders, employees, retirees and citizens.

But a new analysis from Michigan State University suggests we might want to hold up on judging Detroit and take a look at our own cities and towns.

That MSU report finds cities all around Michigan face the very same mountain of "legacy" debt that toppled Detroit.

Study co-author Eric Scorsone joined us today.

Stateside
4:30 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

New MSU report says other Michigan cities might be in the same trouble as Detroit

Eric Scorsone, MSU Extension specialist and economist.
Michigan State University

As Detroit's troubles and "dirty laundry" have been aired out on a world-wide stage, there has been plenty of finger-pointing and judging of the city's leaders, employees, retirees and citizens.

But a new analysis from Michigan State University suggests we might want to hold up on judging Detroit and take a look at our own cities and towns.

That MSU report finds cities all around Michigan face the very same mountain of "legacy" debt that toppled Detroit.

Study co-author Eric Scorsone joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:24 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

How has retirement changed in Michigan?

Flickr user SalFalko Flickr

It used to be a worker could set his or her sights on retiring at age 65, get that gold watch and join the ranks of the retired.

No longer.

From longer life expectancy to the baby-boomers whose investments and house values were tanked by the Great Recession, to younger workers being squeezed out by older workers who are hanging on to their jobs longer, retirement in America has changed.

The American Retirement Initiative has come about to help lead the conversation about how to improve retirement planning for all of us.

It’s headed up by a Michigander who got his undergrad in economics and graduate business degrees from the University of Michigan. Keith Green is the President at the American Retirement Initiative and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:24 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Michigan House Speaker Jase Bolger visited Detroit and left enlightened

Republican Jase Bolger, State Speaker of the House
Michigan Municipal League Flickr

Late last month, on October 28th to be precise, the Speaker of Michigan’s House traveled from Lansing to Detroit. Not for a political meeting, or a dinner, or a ball game.

Jase Bolger (R-Midland) came at the invitation of a Detroit lawmaker to see for himself what people in Detroit face day-in and day-out.

And it would seem that what he saw and heard left its mark.

Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley has written a series of columns about this apparent enlightenment of House Speaker Bolger, and she joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:24 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Michigan filmmaker's new film explores bullying from the point of view of the bully

NCWD/youth

As social media has embedded itself into our lives, so too has the national conversation about bullying.

Facebook, Twitter and other forms of social media have given bullies boundless opportunities to torture their victims. What used to be something that happened in school halls and classrooms now finds its way into every corner of the lives of our young people.

One of the voices that has joined this conversation about bullying is that of a Michigan filmmaker. Her newest film, shot in Oakland County, is called "The Bully Chronicles."

It brings us the story of teen bullying through the eyes of the bully, and she recently turned to the Huffington Post, where she wrote to the teens accused of bullying a 12-year-old Florida girl to the point where she committed suicide by jumping off a tower.

Her post was headlined "From One Bully To Another: An Open Letter to Rebecca Sedwick's Bullies."

Amy Weber joined us in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:10 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Binge drinking is a problem in high school students too

Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

There has been much attention and concern about binge drinking among college-age students.

But what about high school students?

That's what the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research wanted to learn about.

As part of its annual Monitoring the Future Study, researchers collected data from more than 16,000 high school seniors. They were surveyed between 2005-and-2011.

And what they learned should be a true warning to parents of high schoolers.

Developmental psychologist Megan Patrick was the lead author of this study, and she joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:33 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Grand Army of the Republic building in Detroit has a new lease on life

historicdetroit.org

It was one of the more memorable vacant buildings in downtown Detroit, but its days of being vacant and decaying are, happily, in the past.

The historic Grand Army of the Republic Hall at Cass and Grand River is getting a new lease on life thanks to brothers Tom and David Carleton and their partner Sean Emery.

They bought the little castle-like building in 2011 from the City of Detroit for $220,000 and started cleaning and restoring it at once.

Now this architectural gem will be home to the partners’ media production firm Mindfield.

It stands as an example of an historic building being saved, not by a tycoon with very deep pockets, but some small business owners with a vision.

One of those partners, Tom Carleton, joined us today.

*Listen to the interview above.

Stateside
5:23 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Bringing music to the bedside, UM social worker performs for hospital patients

Betsy Beckerman
University of Michigan Health System University of Michigan

An interview with Betsy Beckerman.

There’s little doubt that music can influence our emotions in powerful ways. From pumping us up, to soothing and comforting — music can take us there.

And that’s what Ann Arbor-based singer-musician and social worker Betsy Beckerman hopes to do. She’s a bedside musician, offering her guitar and voice to patients of all ages at the University of Michigan Hospital. 

Beckerman’s work is part of the Gifts of Art program at the University’s Health System, and it’s one of the best examples in the nation of what’s known as “arts in healthcare.”

Betsy Beckerman joins us in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:20 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Do Michigan's colleges need to focus more on the state than the 'global community'?

The Beaumont Tower on Michigan State University's campus.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

Are Michigan colleges and universities so focused outward that they have become "placeless"? Are families being needlessly fractured by a growing emphasis on global engagement, and a move away from local involvement and commitment?

Jeffrey Polet, a professor of political science at Hope College in Holland thinks so. In a column for Bridge Magazine Polet argues that Michigan’s “hallowed halls may lead to the world, but they also contribute to the fracturing of communities.”

Polet talks to us about what he’s seen that caused him to write his piece, and where his criticism lies.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:18 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

SUV and pickup sales are on the rise, but how long will the 'Ron Burgundy' bump last?

SUV sales are on the rise.
Photo courtesy of Toyota

As every driver is happy to note, gas prices are down. Today you can find gas prices close to, and even under, $3 a gallon.

And just on cue, American are buying pickups and SUVs at rate that hasn’t been seen since the Great Recession began.

Believe it or not, some of that seems to be due to one man — Anchorman Ron Burgundy.

During the baseball playoffs and the World Series, Dodge released commercials with Will Ferrell reprising his Ron Burgundy character. Sales of the 2014 Dodge Durango jumped 58.5 percent as those commercials hit our TV screens.

But haven't we done this before — Americans fall in love with SUVs and pickups, only to have gas prices leapfrog back up, leaving us pining for small, fuel-efficient cars?

Read more
Stateside
5:15 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Could there be major changes in how insurance covers abortion in Michigan?

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Matthileo Flickr

24 boxes crammed with 315,477 petition signatures.

That's what it might take to effect a major change in the way insurance covers abortion in Michigan.

Pro-life activists have turned in those signatures in their effort to force insurance companies and health plans to offer abortion coverage only if a customer buys a separate rider, and a woman would have to buy that rider before knowing whether she needs an abortion.

She would not be allowed to buy that coverage after getting pregnant, even in the case of rape or incest.

Kathleen Gray from the Detroit Free Press joined us to talk about this “legislative initiative.”

Environment & Science
4:38 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Why are moose populations declining?

Rolf Peterson on Isle Royale.
Mark Brush Michigan Radio

All across North America, something is happening to the moose.

From British Columbia to New Hampshire, moose populations are thinning out, and no one has been able to point to a good, clear reason why.

For the status of moose here in Michigan, we turned to Rolf Peterson, Professor at Michigan Technological University. He joined us from Houghton.

*Listen to the interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:37 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

Gas prices are nudging down and big pickup and SUV sales are up.

In fact, sales of those vehicles haven't been this strong since before the Great Recession. What does that mean for the future of the auto industry? And what happens when we see a spike in gas prices again.

And, colleges and universities try to attract global attention and international students, but one Michigan professor says there are consequences to looking abroad like losing a sense of place.

But first, 24 boxes crammed with 315,477 petition signatures.

That's what it might take to effect a major change in the way insurance covers abortion in Michigan.

Pro-life activists have turned in those signatures in their effort to force insurance companies and health plans to offer abortion coverage only if a customer buys a separate rider, and a woman would have to buy that rider before knowing whether she needs an abortion.

She would not be allowed to buy that coverage after getting pregnant, even in the case of rape or incest.

Kathleen Gray from the Detroit Free Press joined us to talk about this “legislative initiative.”

Politics & Culture
5:20 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Stateside for Monday, November 11th, 2013

Driverless cars might just be a futurist's dream-no longer. The University of Michigan has announced its plans to bring a fleet of networked, driverless cars to Ann Arbor by the year 2021. We have the details on today's show.

And the temperatures are falling and parts of Michigan have snow on the ground. We asked if winter has already arrived.

Also, the Farm Bill passed last January took an important subsidy away from organic farmers. What does the loss of this subsidy mean to organic farmers in Michigan? And does a farm have to go through the trouble and expense of getting certified to be organic?

First on the show, it's been less than a week since voters in three very different Michigan cities all approved ballot initiatives allowing small amounts of marijuana for personal use on private property.

And that has pro-marijuana advocates hoping those votes will boost pressure on state lawmakers to legalize or decriminalize pot.

Michigan Public Radio Network's Lansing correspondent Jake Neher joined us today to give an overview of what efforts are underway.

Stateside
5:03 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Driverless cars could arrive in Ann Arbor in 2021

Peter Blanchard Flickr

Imagine driving through Ann Arbor, glancing over at the car next to you only to realize that the driver does not have his or her hands on the steering wheel, yet the car is moving along in traffic just fine.

That could happen in just a few short years.

The University of Michigan has announced plans to bring a fleet of networked, driverless cars to Ann Arbor by 2021.

Here to talk about what that would look like in the streets of Ann Arbor and what that might mean to drivers everywhere is the director of the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute. Peter Sweatman joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

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