Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

                            About | Cyndy | Staff | Podcast | Suggest A Topic 

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

Keep in touch with Michigan Radio's Stateside with Cynthia Canty on Facebook or Twitter 

Genre: 

Pages

Politics & Government
3:46 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Michigan's Ronna Romney McDaniel named newest member of Republican National Committee

Ronna Romney McDaniel at the 2012 Republican National Convention
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Over the weekend, Michigan Republicans chose a new member of the Republican National Committee to take the seat vacated when Terri Lynn Land stepped down to run for Carl Levin's Senate seat. 

The new member is someone with quite a Michigan-centric political pedigree.

Ronna Romney McDaniel is Mitt Romney's niece, and the granddaughter of Michigan's 43rd governor, George Romney. 

What does her election mean for Michigan's profile on the Republican National Committee? 

We're joined by Michigan Public Radio Network Lansing Bureau Chief, Rick Pluta. 

Read more
Economy
3:45 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Charles H. Wright Museum could be lost in bankruptcy

A painting currently on exhibit at Charles H. Wright.
thewright.org

As Detroit's bankruptcy story has unfolded, a great deal of attention has been focused on the Detroit Institute of Arts and its struggle to keep pieces of its collection safe from being sold to satisfy Detroit's creditors. 

Sitting on the sidelines through all of this is another of Detroit's cultural gems.

The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is the largest museum in the nation devoted to African American history. 

Read more
Stateside
3:45 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Has Michigan stopped the hemorrhage of folks packing up and moving out?

corriganmoving.com

A recently released migration study from United Van Lines finds that people aren't leaving Michigan in droves anymore.

For the past 37 years, United Van Lines has tracked who's moving where among the 50 states  to see which states are in demand, which are stable and which are the ones people want to leave.

And for the first time in 16 years, this migration study contains good news for Michigan.

We spoke with Corrigan Moving Systems agent Dave Corrigan.

Listen to the full interview above.

Sports
2:12 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Michigan figure skaters set world record at Sochi

Meryl Davis and Charlie White - World Champions 2013
Ludwig Welnicki en.wikipedia.org

One of the most compelling Michigan stories to emerge from the Sochi Winter Olympics has been in the ice dancing competition. Fifteen of the 24 teams train at three Metro Detroit facilities, including Arctic Edge in Canton.

Sunday's short program left two teams at the head of the pack: Canada's Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, and Charlie Davis and Meryl White for Team USA. Both pairs train at Arctic Edge, and both share the same coach.

Today, the two teams competed for gold, and...

<<< SPOILER  ALERT: DON'T CLICK THROUGH if you don't want to know what happened today in Sochi>>>

Read more
Politics & Culture
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, Feb.13, 2014

When it comes to support for emergency care services, the U.S. just barely squeaked by with a passing grade, at least according to a new state-by-state report card put out by the American College of Emergency Physicians.

And how did Michigan measure up, you might ask? Well, it turns out we're failing in access to emergency health care. We heard some recommendations about ways to move forward.

Then, we met a woman who’s trying to help people come together to have some uncomfortable, but enlightening, conversations about race, class and more.

And, we spoke with Daniel Howes about Tom Lewand, Detroit’s job czar.

Also, “Saturday Night Live” just hired its first black female cast member in five years. Will this bring more attention to other black comedians?

And, a Michigan historian gave us a closer look at how Michigan milkweed helped us in World War II.

Also, the Michigan Human Society has a new way to find homes for their animals: social media.

First on the show, how do you best measure the progress of students in Michigan's classrooms and, by extension, the effectiveness of their teachers?

It's one of the thorniest challenges being debated in Michigan education.

For years, the Michigan Education Assessment Program (MEAP) and the Michigan Merit Examination (MME) have been the assessment tools. Now, with the move to the Common Core Standards, it's out with the MEAP and MME and in with the what?

Districts around Michigan are gearing up for an online adaptive assessment test in the spring of 2015.

The Michigan Department of Education says the state has only one option for testing students on the Common Core State Standards for the next three years.

And that option is the Smarter Balanced Assessment – the SBA.

But state lawmakers haven't made that official.

We wondered how districts  are preparing for the SBA or whatever test they're told to administer next year.

William Heath is the superintendent of the Morrice Area Schools and principal at Morrice Junior and Senior High School located in Shiawassee County. He joined us today.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

According to a new report, Michigan is failing in access to emergency care

Is a health care emergency coming in 2014?
(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

How are we doing as a state and as a nation, when it comes to our emergency rooms and access to emergency health care?

According to a report card recently released by the American College of Emergency Physicians, not very well. Michigan received a grade of "D" in access to emergency care.

Why are we failing in access to this life-or-death care in Michigan?

Dr. Michael Nauss is a senior emergency room physician at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. And he's a board member of the Michigan College of Emergency Physicians. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Deep Dive Detroit helps start conversations about social justice

Lester Graham Michigan Radio

What discussions and conversations should we be having around Michigan that we are veering away from?

What's the price we're paying for not opening up and talking about hot-button issues like racism, poverty, food justice, LGBT rights, and so much more?

That's what our next guest asked herself, and that led her to co-found Deep Dive Detroit. Its mission is to "create a safe place for uncomfortable conversations between disparate groups."

Co-founder Lauren Hood joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Michigan Humane Society uses social media to place animals in homes

Jennifer Waters Creative Commons

This is worth taking a look at as Facebook marks its 10th birthday. Social media is being used by the Michigan Humane Society to find homes for its orphaned animals.

Kelly Stork is the social media specialist for the Michigan Humane Society, and she joined us today to tell us more about it.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Black female comedians are receiving more attention

Satori Shakoor
Twitter

A new face recently joined the cast of "Saturday Night Live" and made plenty of headlines when she did.

Comic Sasheer Zamata became the first black female cast member of SNL in five years, since the departure of Maya Rudolph. She was discovered through a talent search that focused strictly on black female comedians.

What does this extra attention mean for other black women who want to make us laugh?

One of those women is Detroiter Satori Shakoor, actor, writer, comedian and creator of "The Secret Society of Twisted Storytellers." She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:52 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Michigan milkweed played a key role in WWII

Milkweed
Flickr user keithcarver Flickr

Think about World War II and the ways Michigan helped the war effort: The Arsenal of Democracy, Rosie the Riveter, heavy bombers rolling off the assembly line at Willow Run.

And milkweed.

Yes, the common weed found in the northwest Lower Peninsula went to war.

Gerry Wykes is a historian and freelance author/illustrator who recently wrote about milkweed for Mlive and Michigan History Magazine. He joined us today to explain how this weed helped in the war effort.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:52 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Detroit's jobs czar Tom Lewand claims to have the 'best job in America'

Peter Martorano Flickr

It’s time for our Thursday check-in with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes.

His focus today was on someone who says he's got "the best job in America." Tom Lewand is the man in the Mike Duggan administration whose mission is to find jobs for Detroiters.

Daniel Howes joined us today to tell us more about this job.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:52 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

What can we expect from the Smarter Balanced Assessment?

Michigan students may have more rigorous performance expectations on MEAP and other standardized tests.
Alberto G. Creative Commons

How do you best measure the progress of students in Michigan's classrooms and, by extension, the effectiveness of their teachers?

It's one of the thorniest challenges being debated in Michigan education.

For years, the Michigan Education Assessment Program (MEAP) and the Michigan Merit Exam (MME) have been the assessment tools. Now, with the move to the Common Core Standards, it's out with the MEAP and MME and in with the what?

Districts around Michigan are gearing up for an online adaptive assessment test in the spring of 2015.

The Michigan Department of Education says the state has only one option for testing students on the Common Core State Standards for the next three years.

And that option is the Smarter Balanced Assessment, the SBA.

But state lawmakers haven't made that official.

We wondered how districts  are preparing for the SBA or whatever test they're told to administer next year.

William Heath is superintendent of the Morrice Area Schools and the principal at Morrice Junior and Senior High School located in Shiawassee County. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:05 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Are Detroit's female and minority entrepreneurs ignored?

Detroit's skyline.
Peter Martorano Flickr

There has been much talk – some of it here on this show – about opportunities for entrepreneurs in Detroit.

After more than a century of being dominated by big business – General Motors, Chrysler, Packard – the new look of business in Detroit is small, nimble, and full of innovation.

Some have raised the question whether there has been an inordinate amount of attention paid to white entrepreneurs – and male entrepreneurs.

Lisa Cook, an associate professor of economics and international relations at Michigan State University, says that many are ignoring women and ethnic minorities’ roles in Detroit’s entrepreneurial scene.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
3:52 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Health professionals trained in environmental issues also learn to share knowledge with community

A physician administers a vaccination.
CDC CDC


It takes a lot of heavy lifting to become a physician, a nurse, a dietician or other health-care professional. Long years of coursework and clinical training leave little room to learn other important skills – the kind of skills that can make a health professional an important player in the public policy sphere and prepared to tackle some of our most urgent environmental health challenges.

That's why the Ecology Center is offering a new fellowship program that can train health professionals about effective civic engagement and environmental health risks.

Listen to the full piece above.

Stateside
3:26 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Are Detroit's pet coke piles coming back?

Pet coke piles on the Detroit River.
James Fassinger Stillscenes


A meeting of the Detroit Board of Zoning Appeals yesterday resulted in some verbal firework, some confusion, and much scrutiny.

That's because the hearing involved a request from the company that was home to massive piles of petroleum coke last summer. The petroleum coke — or pet coke, as it’s called — is a byproduct of refining heavy crude oil brought in by pipeline from Alberta.

The people who had to live near four-story piles of pet coke, and breathe in clouds of pet coke dust last year before the stuff was moved out, are now watching to see if Detroit Bulk Storage is trying to get pet coke back on the Detroit Riverfront.

Dave Battagello has been tracking this story for The Windsor Star.

Listen to the full interview above.

Made In Michigan
3:10 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Ball Park Franks: A Michigan-made tradition

Did you know Ball Park Franks came from Michigan?
user andrewmalone Flickr

Joel Stone, curator at the Detroit Historical Museum, tells us the history of Ball Park Franks.

Some might argue there's nothing more American than baseball. 

Well, did you know those Ball Park Franks that go with it are Michigan-made?

Back in 1958, the owners of Tiger Stadium were not happy with the hot dogs served at the games. So they asked Detroit-based company, Hygrade Food Corp., to come up with a better version. 

Gus Hauf, a Hygrade employee, had already developed his secret recipe for the hot dog that decade. His co-worker, Mary Ann Kirk, came up with the "Ball Park" name, cementing the relationship between baseball and hot dogs. For her out-of-the-park idea, Mary Ann earned $25 and a leather chair

"Michigan had kind of the best frankfurters in the country," said Joel Stone, the curator of the Detroit Historical Museum. "And the Ball Park was a perfect example of that."

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:18 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

New study offers insight into why minorities are underrepresented in state Legislature

Replacing the Michigan Business Tax is high on the legislature's agenda
Lester Graham Michigan Radio

New research from Michigan State University says it's not voters who should be blamed for the lack of minorities in state legislatures. Rather, it has to do with political parties.

Eric Gonzalez Juenke is an assistant professor of political science at MSU. He looked at nearly 10,000 state elections, and he joined us today to give us his findings.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

January snowfall broke records in some parts of the state

Outdoor Power Equipment Institute

If you ask just about anyone in Michigan about the weather this winter, chances are he or she will swear there has never been this much snow.

Well, yes and no. Some cities shattered their snowfall records in January, but in some parts of the state, January snowfall was pretty much business as usual.

Let's see who has legit bragging rights when it comes to snowfall.

MLive meteorologist Mark Torregrossa, who also runs the site farmerweather.com, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Washtenaw County courtroom uses principles of peacemaking court

user mconnors MorgueFile.com

If you were to think of an adjective to describe just what happens in a typical courtroom, the word adversarial might come to mind.

But there’s a "new-but-ancient" dynamic happening in a Washtenaw County courtroom that is attracting great interest among the state’s legal community.

It’s the new peacemaking court, guided by Native American principles.

What are these principles? And how might they make a difference in delivering justice and repairing damaged lives?

The Hon. Timothy Connors from the Washtenaw County Trial Court joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

How has NAFTA affected the auto industry in Michigan?

White House

We've been exploring the effects of NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, recently. NAFTA is 20 years old this year and has had dramatic effects on the state and U.S. economy.

What has NAFTA meant to the auto industry, in particular, the movement of companies and jobs to Mexico – companies and jobs that used to be based in Michigan?

We turned to Stateside's partners at the BBC for more information. BBC correspondent Luis Fajardo joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Pages