Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There's no denying that state spending and budgets are stretched tight, and it's forcing a fresh look at the soaring costs of our prisons.

What are we really getting for the $2 billion we spend per year on corrections? And how can we trim that corrections bill?

Mark Bennington / Mark Bennington Headshots

    

Anyone with even a passing knowledge of world history knows about the horrors that came out of the Nazi attempt to exterminate the Jews of Europe.

Some six million of Europe’s Jews – 63% of Europe’s Jewish population at the time – killed in the Holocaust.

Barbara Stark-Nemon’s debut novel, Even in Darkness, is the true story of her great-aunt Klare Kohler and her experiences living through the Holocaust.


Toxic hotspots, or "Areas of Concern" around Michigan's shoreline.
Great Lakes Commission

"Lake Erie is dead" and "the Cuyahoga River is on fire."

Those were actual headlines in the late 1960s spotlighting the deteriorating conditions of the Great Lakes in an age when rampant pollution was the norm.

Stories like these led to the passing of the Clean Water Act of 1972, which helped restore the Great Lakes.

Today on Stateside:

Michigan state representatives have introduced a package of bills attempting to cut same-sex marriage off at the pass. Wayne State University Law professor Robert Sedler talks to us about how the proposed legislation sits with the U.S. Constitution.

Charlie Davidson / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

It's easy to assume that all adolescent pregnancies are unplanned. But some teenagers do plan to become pregnant. Instead of worrying about birth control or abstinence, these teenagers actually try to conceive. And they have high hopes that a child will bring more love and meaning into their lives.  

Twenty-one-year-old Tawney Morris is trying to make the best of a hot day with her two-year-old son, Chaz. She sets up a slide and kiddie pool outside their apartment in Traverse City.

The Supreme Court is expected to hand down rulings on a number of cases regarding same-sex marriage this week.
user Ted Eytan / flickr

State Rep. Todd Courser, R-Lapeer, is attempting to head same-sex marriage off at the pass with a new package of bills that would take secular elected officials out of the marriage business altogether.

boats and people in Torch lake
Flickr user Jen van Kaam / Flickr

Michigan is known for the Great Lakes, but according to the Department of Natural Resources, there are over 11,000 inland lakes in the state.

In fact, the Michigan Historical Society says, no matter where you go in our state you’re within six miles of an inland lake.

But the question of who owns the rights to these inland lakes has been known to cause disputes.

Blue Ocean Faith is an all-inclusive Christian community in Ann Arbor
user Marlith / Flickr

Ken Wilson founded Vineyard Church in Ann Arbor and served on the national board of Vineyard USA for seven years.

Letters on a typewriter.
user Andreas. / Flickr - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

Have you noticed that some people are spelling their names using all lower-case letters?

We have.

And that got us wondering about why people choose to do this, and where all the capitalization rules came from.

Today on Stateside:

County clerks across Michigan are preparing for whatever way the U.S. Supreme Court rules on same-sex marriage. Former State Representative Barb Byrum, now the Ingham county clerk, is here to talk about the upcoming decision.

Why are some people choosing to spell their name with all lower-case letters? Professor of English at the University of Michigan Anne Curzan talks us through the history of capitalization.

imelenchon / morgueFile

Powdered alcohol was legalized this year and is hitting the marketplace this summer.

But some states have already banned it. 

Last month, Michigan’s Senate said yes – unanimously – to a ban.

A new poll from the University of Michigan finds a majority of the public is right there with the state senators. 

The Michigan State House of Representatives in Lansing, Michigan
user CedarBendDrive / flickr

It’s hard to argue against the fact that informed citizens are the cornerstone of democracy.

That’s the idea behind the Open Meetings Act: keeping the business of public entities open, transparent, and accessible to the public.

Dave Trumpie / Courtesy photo

County clerks across the state are getting ready for however the U.S. Supreme Court might rule on legalizing same-sex marriage.

Ingham County Clerk Barb Byrum says she’s keeping an e-mail list of gay and lesbian couples that want to get married, “…so when a decision in support of equality does come down, I can have direct communication with those parties that may be interested in obtaining a marriage license.”

Alan Newton / Parkhurst Brothers Publishers

This summer marks the 32nd season for the Stone Circle.

Poet Terry Wooten is known for having created this space for poetry, storytelling and music on a family farm near Elk Rapids.

"There's something in our DNA that you cannot sit around a fire and not want to hear stories," said Wooten.

Now, he has released a collection of his poems called The Stone Circle Poems covering many decades of his writing and showcasing his ability to make poetry accessible to everyone.

Flickr user Justin Leonard / Flickr

Water is one of Michigan's most abundant and precious resources, but the rules for governing its use aren't always clear.

Wayne State Law Professor and water law specialist Noah Hall joins us to discuss the rules surrounding the use of creeks and rivers. 

Today on Stateside:

* Lon Johnson, chair of the Michigan Democratic Party, is thinking about a job-change

* Consumers are turning to social media as a way to get a company’s attention rather than getting lost in a voice mail jungle when they call some 800-number

* Why it’s important for Michigan to develop its own story on The Next Idea

* There's a new competition show starting tonight on the History channel. Forged in Fire challenges contestants to make medieval weapons. One contestant hails from Detroit

Anders Adermark / Flickr http://ow.ly/OE5HR

Popping the cork on a bottle of Champagne can make an occasion extra-special.

The reputation of real Champagne comes largely from the industry standard that requires the Champagne to be very consistent from one year to the next – unlike ordinary red and white wines, which can be very different from year to year.

Making Champagne at the big houses of famous names comes down to two or three sets of taste buds in the heads of the wine team.

Forge Detroit / Facebook

A new competition show called Forged in Fire starts tonight on the cable channel History.

Contestants will be challenged to make swords and knives, including period-specific weapons like medieval broadswords or ancient throwing blades.

Beachgoers on a Lake Michigan beach in the Upper Peninsula.
Joseph Novak / Creative Commons

So you want to stroll along a Great Lakes beach. Can a cottage-owner come shoo you away?

Today we looked at the water rules in the Great Lakes State.

SEO / flickr

More and more, consumers are realizing that social media is a much better way to get a company’s attention than getting lost in a voice mail jungle when you call some 1-800-phone line.

Michigan Radio’s social media producer Kimberly Springer joined us to talk about what companies and consumers are learning about using social media.

WWW.MICHIGANDEMS.COM/LON

Michigan Radio's It's Just Politics co-hosts Rick Pluta and Zoe Clark break down the news that Lon Johnson, Chair of the Michigan Democratic Party, is considering a run in Michigan's 1st Congressional District in 2016. 

Screenshot/Chrysler

The Next Idea

In 2009, the headline of a Time magazine cover story read “The Tragedy of Detroit” with a shadowy photo of a blighted factory in the background. The national press was brutal.

Flickr user Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The list of presidential hopefuls grows each week, and it seems voters here in Michigan and across the country are unimpressed with this crop of candidates.

WDIV/Detroit News survey released yesterday shows Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Jeb Bush, Rand Paul, Marco Rubio and Scott Walker each drew more “unfavorable” than “favorable” ratings.

Today on Stateside:

 

* As Detroit gets back up on its feet following the bankruptcy, we've seen the development action centered on downtown. Now a developer is stepping up to put ideas and dollars into a west-side Detroit neighborhood.

 

* Bargainers for the UAW and Detroit automakers will get down to brass tacks next month. Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes previews the talks between the UAW and Detroit automakers. Talks start next month.

 

UAW

Bargainers for the UAW and the Detroit automakers will get down to brass tacks the week of July 13.

The tug of war will be between workers who expect to get back some of what they gave up during the downturn of 2008-09, and auto executives who can't fall back into the practices that got them in such trouble. 

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes believes it's all going to come down to who's looking ahead through the windshield or at the past in the rear-view mirror.

"As you go into negotiations, you can't help but think that the UAW and their membership are looking at the fact that over the past four years of the current contract, GM, Ford, and what is now FCA or Chrysler, have made $67.7 billion of profits in North America." 

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Ahya Simone doesn’t particularly like the word transition when she describes being a transgender woman.

Simone was born and raised in Detroit. From an early age she was drawn to the performing arts, singing in church choir and, eventually, while attending Cass Technical High School in Detroit, learning to play the harp.

But it wasn’t until she was in college at Wayne State University that Simone decided it was time to get real, and start living her truth.

Here's a video of Ahya Simone performing with her harp. 

With each new idea, momentum builds in Detroit

Jun 18, 2015
Courtesy of Focus: HOPE

The Next Idea 

Innovation is at the center of Detroit’s inclusive recovery. Yet this word “innovation” is used so often that its meaning tends to get a little obscured.

Rather than the narrow definition of technological advancement, the meaning of innovation we should use in Detroit is about doing things differently, redefining our future, and challenging ourselves to move beyond business as usual. 

Detroit skyline.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Development action is centered on downtown Detroit as the city gets back on its feet after bankruptcy. Corktown and Midtown have seen a lot of new construction, and now a developer is stepping up to put ideas and money into a west side Detroit neighborhood, the Herman Kiefer complex.

Jamie Berlin

"Making the world safer for pollinators, one city at a time."

That's the mission of Bee City USA. It's a national effort to focus attention on the importance of honeybees to our ecosystem and to agriculture.

And Jamie Berlin, beekeeper and founder of the beekeeping group Ypsi Melissa, wants Ypsilanti to win the designation as "Bee City USA."

Led by Dr. E. LaQuint Weaver, the Hallelujah Singers are a group of men and women singing together in an all-star community choir.
Andrew Sacks

The documentary film Let's Have Some Church Detroit Style was the Audience Choice winner at the second annual Freep Film Festival earlier this year.

And on June 20, it’s coming to Ann Arbor’s Michigan Theater.

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