Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Stateside
4:38 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

Former Nixon Administration official says it's time for a new political party: The Moderate Majority

The U.S. Capitol.
user kulshrax Flickr

(Editor's note: This interview was first broadcast on November 14, 2013)

Polls following last month’s partial federal shutdown make it pretty clear: Americans are tired of both Republican and Democratic lawmakers. Two-thirds of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents disapproved of the shutdown. Fifty-seven percent of Americans were angry with the way Democrats handled the shutdown. In total, eight in 10 Americans say they oppose the shutdown.

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Politics & Culture
4:00 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, December 24th, 2013

Today on Stateside, a former Nixon official talks about possibly forming a third political party.

And Michigan writer Natalie Burg talks about being au pair for a family in Sweden. 

Also, Kinetic Affect uses the power of poetry to help people unlock their voices.

That and more on today's Stateside.

*Listen to audio above.

Politics & Culture
4:00 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Stateside for Monday, December 23rd, 2013

On today's show, protecting the practice of breastfeeding. Michigan is one of only five states that doesn't legally protect the practice.

And solving a 50-year-old cold case in Battle Creek.

Also, it's the 75th anniversary of legendary folklorist Alan Lomax' trip to Michigan. That and more on today's Stateside.

Listen to the audio above.

Arts & Culture
3:04 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Author Blaine Pardoe delves into a 1963 Battle Creek murder

barnesandnoble.com

Blaine Pardoe interview for 9/3/2013

(Editor's note: This story was first broadcast on September 3rd, 2013) 

The mystery of who killed Daisy Zick has been on the minds of police and residents of Battle Creek since January, 1963.  Though at least three people caught a glimpse of her killer, no one has ever been brought to justice for the crime.  

Writer Blaine Pardoe's latest book is called Murder in Battle Creek: The Mysterious Death of Daisy Zick.  He joined Cynthia Canty in the studio to talk about Daisy Zick, her unsolved murder, and the possibility that the killer may still be alive.  

Listen to the story above.

Stateside
1:56 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Michigan lawmakers moving to legally protect breastfeeding moms

user tiarescott Flickr

It seems hard to believe in 2013, but it's true -- Michigan is one of only five states without a law protecting breastfeeding moms, allowing them to breastfeed their babies in any public or private location.

But that might change soon. The State Senate recently passed a bill that would protect breastfeeding Moms. The bill now goes to the State House for lawmakers to discuss in the new session, starting January 8.  Joining me is a lawmaker who has been working on the bill, State Senator Rebekah Warren.

The Living Room
11:10 am
Fri December 20, 2013

Listen to these stories from those who knew what it was like in Jackson state prison

Jackson State Prison from a 1949 postcard.
Donald Harrison Flickr

Jackson, Michigan was home to one of the largest prisons in the world – the Michigan State Prison, later renamed the State Prison of Southern Michigan.

We went on a tour of the old prison with Jackson Historic Prison Tours. While there we met some former prisoners and prison staff, and decided to follow up with them afterwards.

Listen to their powerful stories above.

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Stateside
10:24 am
Fri December 20, 2013

Detroit News columnist talks about Duggan and Bing

Dave Bing in the office he'll be leaving soon.
Kate Davidson Michigan Radio

In less than two weeks, Detroit will have a new mayor.

Mike Duggan's term begins January first. Outgoing Mayor Dave Bing has been making his "farewell tour" around Detroit.

What is the Bing legacy? And what might we expect from his successor?

We turned to Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes for some perspective.

Listen above.

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Stateside
9:54 am
Fri December 20, 2013

Listen for a list of good winter reads by Keith Taylor

Keith Taylor
Robert Turney

This is the week we say farewell to autumn and officially welcome winter. (Unofficially, we can all agree, winter has arrived early and seems to have settled right in for the duration.)

And one of the great pleasures of changing seasons here on Stateside is the chance to welcome back poet and writer Keith Taylor. Taylor coordinates the undergraduate creative writing program at the University of Michigan. But we like to think of him as our Friendly Stateside Reading Guide.

Listen to Keith’s book pics above.

Stateside
3:07 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

Exploring "Ballroom Culture" in Detroit

The cover of Marlon M. Bailey’s book.
UM Press

What is “Ballroom Culture”? Well, a surface definition might be a culture that centers on a competition where black LGBT individuals dress, dance and vogue - competing for prizes and trophies.

But there is more to Ballroom Culture as my next guest spells out in his new book "Butch Queens Up In Pumps: Gender, Performance and Ballroom Culture in Detroit.”

Marlon Bailey is an Associate Professor of Gender Studies and American Studies at Indiana University. And he brings another perspective to his writing -- that of a black gay man who grew up in Detroit and who was deeply involved in Ballroom Culture.

Listen to the interview above.

Politics & Culture
3:00 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, December 19th, 2013

There are currently more than 45,000 people in prison in Michigan, but most of us will not experience what life is like behind bars. On today's show, we spoke with prisoners at the Michigan State Prison in Jackson to get their perspectives on life in our state.

And, then, later in the hour one of our favorite writers joined us. Keith Taylor gives us his picks for winter-time reads.

First up we talk with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes. In less than two weeks, Detroit will have a new mayor. Mike Duggan's term begins January first. Outgoing Mayor Dave Bing has been making his "farewell tour" around Detroit. What is the Bing legacy? And what might we expect from his successor?

Politics & Culture
4:27 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, December 18th, 2013

On today's program, a major new study  finds attitudes about drinking, drugs and tobacco are changing among teens, and some of the results might surprise you. Then later in the hour, a new group is trying to make Michigan's Legislature go part-time. Forty-six other states have done it, should Michigan?

 But first, it was October first when the healthcare.gov website opened for business. The rocky launch of the public portal to the Affordable Care Act has consumed much of the nation's attention and news space. The December 23 enrollment deadline is at hand. We wanted to see if the consumer experience with Healthcare.gov has improved - see what problems remain - and find out how many of us have been able to complete applications, and actually select a marketplace plan.  Don Hazaert, the director of Michigan Consumers for Healthcare, joined us today. It's one of four navigator agencies in our state for the Affordable Care Act.

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Stateside
3:54 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

One group believes switching to a part-time Legislature will be good for Michigan

Norm Kammeraad is the Chairman of the Committee to Restore Michigan’s Part-Time Legislature.
Screenshot parttimemi.com

Should Michigan revert to the kind of legislature originally called for when Michigan voters drafted the first constitution in 1835?  A part-time legislature? 

Norm Kammeraad says absoluetly, yes.

He is the Chairman of The Committee to Restore Michigan’s Part-Time Legislature. They’re hoping to gather nearly 400,000 voter signatures between January and June in order to put the question on the November 2014 ballot.

Yesterday, we spoke with Michigan columnist Dennis Lennox. He is against a part-time Michigan Legislature. You can find that interview here

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:35 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Michigan musicians record Christmas CD to support children in need

It's December. That means the airwaves are filled with Holly Jolly Christmases, White Christmases, Jingle Bell Rock and that ever-present Little Drummer Boy.

So, in the interest of public service, we thought we'd present a way for you to hear some fresh holiday music, performed by Michigan artists. The CD is called "A Michigan Christmas of Hope."

Holy Cross Children's Services will receive every penny of money raised from the CD. It's one of the largest private providers of specialized schools and children's services in Michigan.

Devin Scillian is best known as the anchor on WDIV-TV in Detroit. But, he's also built quite a following as a singer-songwriter. And, joining Devin is Russ Russell of Holy Cross Children's Services. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Education
5:13 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Why the quality of life for Michigan's children is stagnating

The quality of life for Michigan's children is not doing so great, according to the Kids Count report.
toshibatelecom toshibatelecom

Michigan's economy may be slogging its way up the hill towards recovery, but life is not getting as good as it should for children in our state.

That's the takeaway from the latest Kids Count report.

Here to tell us more is Jane Zehnder-Merrell. She's the project director for Kids Count in Michigan, part of the Michigan League for Public Policy.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
5:11 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

How one author cut $1,000 from his monthly budget... and made it work

Could you cut $1000 from your monthly budget?
wikimedia commons

For many of us, the word “budget” is not on our favorite words list.

But as so many of us across Michigan discovered during the Great Recession, things can get mighty scary when there's a crunch and we don't have much in the piggy bank.

Detroit News Personal Finance Editor Brian O'Connor writes the "Funny Money" column, offering financial advice to his readers. During the Great Recession, Brian and his family felt the pinch. So he decided to find out if his family could cut its monthly expenses by $1,000. He has turned his experiment  into a new book  “The One-Thousand Dollar Challenge: How One Family Slashed Its Budget Without Moving Under a Bridge or Living on Government Cheese."

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
5:09 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

What do local leaders think about right to work?

Right-to-work protestors outside the State Capitol last December.
david_shane Flickr

It was certainly a fiery, emotional scene at the State Capitol a year ago this month.

That's when the lame-duck Legislature and Governor Snyder rammed through the right-to-work law, and Michigan became the 24th right-to-work state.

The laws took effect in March, making it illegal to force workers to pay union dues as a condition of employment.

So what do our local government leaders think about right to work?

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Stateside
5:07 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Republican strategist says switching to a part-time Legislature would not be good for Michigan

The State Capitol.
Matthileo Flickr

Starting next month, the Committee to Restore Michigan's Part-Time Legislature says they will be looking for your signatures. They've got six months to gather 400,000 voter signatures to get a big question on the November 2014 ballot: Should we amend Michigan's Constitution to switch our state to a part-time Legislature?

We'll be looking at both sides of this idea. Today we welcome a Republican strategist who believes this proposal is not in the best interest of Michigan.

Dennis Lennox is a columnist for The Morning Sun and a public affairs consultant.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:03 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Should Michigan's Legislature go part-time?

Forty-six other states have done it. Now a new group is pushing for it here, but some argue a part-time Legislature could have disastrous results. On today's show, we talk about just how much time lawmakers should spend in Lansing. And then, just in time for the New Year, we'll get some money advice from the Detroit News' Personal Finance Editor Brian O'Connor. His new book is “The One-Thousand Dollar Challenge: How One Family Slashed Its Budget Without Moving Under a Bridge or Living on Government Cheese."

But first we check in on Michigan's kids. A new report out today says life is not getting as good as it should for children in Michigan, even as the state crawls out of the Great Recession.

Jane Zehnder-Merrell is the Project Director for Kids Count in Michigan. It's part of the Michigan League for Public Policy. She joined us to tell us more about the Kids Count report.

Politics & Culture
5:28 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Stateside for Monday, December 16th, 2013

The Great recession and the accompanying housing meltdown changed the way many of us think about home-ownership. For decades, owning a home seemed to be part of the American Dream, but that dream has changed. On today’s show -- the rise of renters and what it means for the state’s housing market.Then, this month marks the 100 year anniversary of one of the most painful chapters in Michigan’s labor history. We explored the Copper Country Strike of 1913 later in the hour.

And, the U.S. birth rate is at a record low as more and more married couples choose to remain child free. We spoke with the director of the Childless by Choice Project about what goes behind this choice and what are the future consequences.

First on the show, Back in 2010, the State Board of Education approved the Common Core State Standards for Michigan — a set of math and English goals for K-12 students.

School districts across the state have spent the past three years integrating the standards into their curriculums. At the same time, we've heard a lot of political debate about Common Core, mostly about the involvement of the federal government in our classrooms.

But in October of this year, state lawmakers OK'd funding for Common Core, and now it is becoming a reality in Michigan classrooms.

We wanted to find out: What does this mean — day-in, day-out — for Michigan's students?

What does a school year under Common Core really look like?

Joining us is Naomi Norman, the executive director of Achievement Initiatives at Washtenaw Intermediate School District and Livingston Educational Service Agency.

Stateside
5:25 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Brighton High School students don hijabs to explore literature, religion and identity

Students at Brighton High School chose to wear hijabs for a full school day
Mark Halonen Brighton High School

An interview with teacher Diana Mason and students from Brighton High

Maybe more than any other, high school can be a time when what you choose to wear has a huge impact on your sense of identity.

As students take their first steps into adulthood, they walk a fine line between fitting in with their peers and developing a unique sense of self.

Earlier this fall, a group of AP language students at Brighton High School were asked to read a memoir by Iranian author Azar Nafisi. The book detailed the experiences of women during that country's religious revolution, including dealing with new standards of modesty in the way they dressed.

To experience the material first-hand, several girls in the class in Brighton chose to spend a full school day wearing hijabs, the head-scarves worn by Muslim women in many parts of the world.

The exercise gave students a chance to learn about an unfamiliar culture and religion. But in a school community where no students and only one teacher outwardly practice Islam, wearing the scarves was a good way to draw curious looks, questions and a few unfriendly comments.

Teacher Diana Mason and three students at Brighton who took part recently told Stateside about the experience.

- John Klein Wilson, Michigan Radio Newsroom

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