Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Politics & Culture
4:57 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, December 5th, 2013

Lots of attention is being paid to Detroit's bankruptcy, but it is not only Detroit that's facing big budget challenges.

Unfunded liabilities and retiree debt are adding up all across our state -- from Ann Arbor to Grand Rapids to Bloomfield Hills -- we'll find out more on today's show.

And, then, later in the hour -- Did you know Muskegon is home to America's tallest singing Christmas tree? It's a West Michigan holiday tradition, and we'll take you inside the show and introduce you to the people that make it possible.

First up, big auto news from around the globe today.

General Motors says it plans to largely withdraw its Chevrolet brand from Europe beginning in 2016.

The automaker says the decision was largely due to a challenging business model and the difficult economic situation in Europe.

Meanwhile, the Ford Mustang is celebrating its 50th birthday with a new design and plans to go global.

Russell Padmore joined us from London. He’s a business reporter for the BBC.

Stateside
4:49 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Detroit is not the only city in Michigan facing enormous budget challenges

The financial woes Detroit is facing aren't isolated.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

All eyes are on Detroit this week, following Tuesday’s historic ruling on Detroit’s eligibility for bankruptcy. For those living outside the city, it's easy to separate themselves from Detroit's problems. 

But many experts say Detroit is not alone.

Detroit is not Michigan's only city that faces enormous budget challenges. Unfunded liabilities and retiree debt are adding up all across our state.

Ted Roelofs, a contributing writer to Bridge Magazine, recently wrote a piece that argues that other cities in Michigan will not be immune to rising legacy costs that, in part, did Detroit in.

Roelofs and John Pottow, a bankruptcy expert at the University of Michigan, talk with us about the future of other Michigan cities in the wake of Detroit’s bankruptcy.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:47 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

What's behind General Motors' decision to withdraw Chevy from Europe?

Chevy's models will be withdrawn from European markets.
Chevrolet

Today, General Motors announced plans to largely withdraw its Chevrolet brand from Europe beginning in 2016.

The automaker says the decision was largely due to a challenging business model and the difficult economic situation in Europe.

Meanwhile, the Ford Mustang is celebrating its 50th birthday with a new design — and plans to go global.

Russell Padmore, business reporter for the BBC, joins us from London to talk about the latest auto news.

Listen to full interview above. 

Stateside
4:47 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Will the DIA survive Detroit's bankruptcy? A Detroit News columnist shares his thoughts

The Detroit Institute of Arts.
Flickr

What’s going to happen with the Detroit Institute of Arts?

 

That’s the question on the minds of many Michiganders after the city of Detroit was deemed eligible for Chapter 9 bankruptcy on Tuesday.

Daniel Howes, a business columnist with The Detroit News, talks with us about all things DIA – a recent appraisal of the institute’s collection, emergency manager Kevyn Orr’s interest in the museum, and a possible rescue plan cooked up by a federal judge.

Listen to full interview above. 

Politics & Culture
4:49 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

Can you imagine paying $7 for a gallon of milk? That reality isn't too far off if Congress can't get it together and pass a Farm Bill. We found out more about the so-called dairy cliff on today's show.

Then, scientists say Lake Superior is heating up faster than any other lake on Earth. We asked why.

And, Traverse City’s festivals are adding jobs and money to the local economy, some residents have had enough. Can a balance be reached?

First on the show, a move by the Michigan Lottery has caught retailers by surprise, a big surprise.

Earlier this year, the State Legislature said no to a budget request from the Michigan Lottery for money to launch online and smart phone lottery sales. Storeowners who sell lottery tickets thought that was the end of that.

Turns out, they were wrong.

Chris Gautz has been following this story for Crain's Detroit Business, and he joined us today.

Stateside
4:47 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Without a new Farm Bill, dairy prices might soar

Milk prices could get up to $7 a gallon without a new Farm Bill.
jschumacher Morguefile

Farms are in the spotlight on Capitol Hill these days. Or, more to the point, the lack of a new Farm Bill.

The old Farm Bill expired October 1st.

A new Farm Bill is more than two years overdue. And so far, congressional leaders have not been inclined to consider passing yet another short-term extension.

Leaders of the House and Senate Agricultural Committees met today, trying to work out differences between their respective bills as they face a deadline of January 1st.

Without a new Farm Bill by that date, trips to the grocery store may bring on serious "sticker shock," especially when you push your cart along the dairy aisle.

Joining us once again to look at the Farm Bill and what might happen if Congress can't pass a new one was Ryan Findlay. He's with the National Legislative Council for the Michigan Farm Bureau. And he was joined by David Schweikhardt, professor in the Department of Agriculture, Food and Resource Economics at Michigan State University.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:41 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Traverse City is bursting with festivals, but is that a good thing?

The Traverse City film festival is one of the city's best known festivals.
Michigan Municipal League Flickr

Can there be too much of a good thing?

That question is buzzing around Traverse City now that summer is behind them.

Some residents are saying they're not happy with the burst of festivals drawing throngs of visitors to Traverse City. Others say those festivals and those visitors add up to jobs for locals and dollars pumped into the economy.

What's the balance that can be struck as Traverse City works to develop a blue economy based on its beautiful freshwater location?

John Flesher, reporter for The Associated Press, and Ken Winter, the longtime Petoskey newspaper editor and publisher, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:38 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Lake Superior is heating up faster than any other lake on Earth

Lake Superior
Flickr user Arthur Chapman Flickr

Lake Superior is warming up.

Scientists say the largest of the Great Lakes is heating up faster than any other lake on Earth.

What's behind the warming? And could this be good news for those who enjoy Great Lakes fishing?

Tim Cline is a PhD student at the University of Washington's School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. He has studied the effect of temperature on fish in Lake Superior, and he joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:32 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Michigan lottery is launching online sales despite denied funding from Legislature

Feeling lucky?
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

A move by the Michigan Lottery has caught retailers by surprise, a big surprise.

Earlier this year, the State Legislature said no to a budget request from the Michigan Lottery for money to launch online and smart phone lottery sales. Store owners who sell lottery tickets thought that was the end of that.

Turns out, they were wrong.

Chris Gautz has been following this story for Crain's Detroit Business, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:03 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

On this historic day, Detroit, Michigan's largest city, is found eligible for Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection. Federal Judge Stephen Rhodes saying, "It is indeed a momentous day. We have here a judicial finding that this once proud and prosperous city is insolvent."

But, just what does all this mean for Detroit? For our state? What happens next?

This hour, we'll get answers to those questions as we're joined by Jack Lessneberry, Michigan Radio's Political Analyst, and Eric Scorsone joins us for a look at the economic consequences of the nation's largest Chapter 9 bankruptcy ever.

Stateside
4:59 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

How does Detroit's bankruptcy fit into the city's past, present, and future?

Streets of Detroit.
user Daviddje Flickr

Let's take time now to put today's ruling by Judge Rhodes into historical context. How does the painful journey into Chapter 9 bankruptcy fit into Detroit's past, present, and most importantly, its future?

We're joined by someone who has covered the news in Michigan for five decades: Michigan Radio's political analyst Jack Lessenberry.

Listen to full interview above.

Stateside
4:58 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

What happened inside the courtroom during today's Detroit bankruptcy trial

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes
John Meiu Detroit Legal News Publishing LLC

Michigan Radio’s Sarah Cwiek was in the courtroom today when U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes ruled that Detroit was eligible for Chapter 9 bankruptcy.

Stephen Henderson, the editorial page editor of the Detroit Free Press, has been covering the bankruptcy trial on the pages of the Freep.

Sarah and Stephen talk with us in the studio today to discuss what happened today, and what it means for Detroiters.

Listen to full interview above. 

Stateside
4:47 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Detroit can file for Chapter 9 bankruptcy. Now what?

Detroit Mayor Dave Bing, Gov. Rick Snyder, and the city's Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr.
mich.gov Michigan Government

Today, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes ruled that Detroit is eligible to enter Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection, and to cut the pensions of city retirees.

What does it mean for residents? Current city employees? City pensioners?

Eric Scorsone, a municipal finance expert from Michigan State University, talks to us about what lies ahead after today’s ruling.

Listen to full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:45 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Stateside for Monday, December 2nd, 2013

Tomorrow will be a historic day in Detroit. That's when a federal judge will decide whether the city is eligible for Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection. On today's show, we took a look at the different ways Judge Steven Rhodes could rule.

Then, we took a look at the future of newspapers. As newsrooms get smaller, and more people hop online for information, will the industry be able to reinvent itself and keep up with the times? 

And, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments this morning in a case that pits Michigan against an Upper Peninsula Indian tribe. We discussed the case with Rick Pluta, who is reporting from Washington D.C..

Also, we spoke to a new Michigan music duo, The Accidentals. 

But, first on the show, the Board of State Canvassers today certified a voter-initiated petition that would put new restrictions on abortion insurance coverage in Michigan. The proposal would ban abortion coverage in standard health insurance plans. Women would only be able to purchase abortion coverage as a separate rider. The measure now goes to the state Legislature, which has 40 days to pass it. If not, it will go to voters on the 2014 ballot.

MLive reporter Jonathan Oosting joined us today to discuss the issue.

Stateside
4:45 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

The future of the news in Michigan

Zoe Clark Michigan Radio

Newspapers aren’t what they used to be. 

Newsrooms are smaller and big stories are being missed.

Case in point: The Flint Journal apologized recently for not informing voters that a city council candidate was also a convicted murderer until a day after he won the election.

So how will people stay informed as newspapers and their staffs are shrinking?

Read more
Stateside
4:42 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Michigan legislature has 40 days to act on Right to Life measure

(file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

This week could bring a vote in the State Legislature that will be closely watched by those on either side of the abortion debate.

The vote would be on a citizen-initiated bill that could end abortion coverage as a standard feature in health insurance policies.

Right-To-Life of Michigan turned in more than 315,000 signatures to get this bill before the Legislature. 

And today, the Board of State Canvassers certified this voter-initiated petition, which sends it on to the state Legislature.

MLive reporter Jonathan Oosting joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:42 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Bay Mills wants to open off-reservation casinos in Michigan

courtesy of www.instant-casino-bonus.com/gaming

  The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments this morning in a case that pits Michigan against an Upper Peninsula Indian tribe.

The case revolves around the tribe's plan to open an off-reservation casino.

Rick Pluta, Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, joined us today from D.C.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:41 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Is Detroit eligible for bankruptcy protection? We'll find out tomorrow

Joy VanBuhler Flickr

Tomorrow will be one for the history books, not just here in Michigan but across the nation.

Tuesday morning is when Federal Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes will rule whether or not Detroit is eligible for Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection.

Detroit News reporter Chad Livengood has covered the bankruptcy trial, and he joined us today to talk about what might happen tomorrow morning.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:39 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Meet indie-folk group The Accidentals

Katie Larson and Savannah Buist
Facebook

Popular music has had stellar examples of singer/songwriters who met in school...whose partnership began at a very young age.

John Lennon and Paul McCartney met when John was 16 and Paul was just 15. Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel met in grade school. They were 12 years old and had their first hit record, "Hey Schoolgirl," when they were just 16 years old.

Now we want you to meet a Michigan duo who are getting a lot of buzz for their indie-folk songs, The Accidentals.

The Accidentals are Katie Larson and Savannah Buist, who met at the Interlochen Arts Academy. They are 18 years old, and they joined us today from Traverse City.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
2:13 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Will new legislation stop another deadly meningitis outbreak?

cdc.gov

Congress has passed new legislation to try to prevent another deadly fungal meningitis outbreak... But, will it be enough?

*Listen to the audio above.

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