Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Politics & Culture
4:45 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Stateside for Monday, December 2nd, 2013

Tomorrow will be a historic day in Detroit. That's when a federal judge will decide whether the city is eligible for Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection. On today's show, we took a look at the different ways Judge Steven Rhodes could rule.

Then, we took a look at the future of newspapers. As newsrooms get smaller, and more people hop online for information, will the industry be able to reinvent itself and keep up with the times? 

And, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments this morning in a case that pits Michigan against an Upper Peninsula Indian tribe. We discussed the case with Rick Pluta, who is reporting from Washington D.C..

Also, we spoke to a new Michigan music duo, The Accidentals. 

But, first on the show, the Board of State Canvassers today certified a voter-initiated petition that would put new restrictions on abortion insurance coverage in Michigan. The proposal would ban abortion coverage in standard health insurance plans. Women would only be able to purchase abortion coverage as a separate rider. The measure now goes to the state Legislature, which has 40 days to pass it. If not, it will go to voters on the 2014 ballot.

MLive reporter Jonathan Oosting joined us today to discuss the issue.

Stateside
4:45 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

The future of the news in Michigan

Zoe Clark Michigan Radio

Newspapers aren’t what they used to be. 

Newsrooms are smaller and big stories are being missed.

Case in point: The Flint Journal apologized recently for not informing voters that a city council candidate was also a convicted murderer until a day after he won the election.

So how will people stay informed as newspapers and their staffs are shrinking?

Read more
Stateside
4:42 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Michigan legislature has 40 days to act on Right to Life measure

(file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

This week could bring a vote in the State Legislature that will be closely watched by those on either side of the abortion debate.

The vote would be on a citizen-initiated bill that could end abortion coverage as a standard feature in health insurance policies.

Right-To-Life of Michigan turned in more than 315,000 signatures to get this bill before the Legislature. 

And today, the Board of State Canvassers certified this voter-initiated petition, which sends it on to the state Legislature.

MLive reporter Jonathan Oosting joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:42 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Bay Mills wants to open off-reservation casinos in Michigan

courtesy of www.instant-casino-bonus.com/gaming

  The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments this morning in a case that pits Michigan against an Upper Peninsula Indian tribe.

The case revolves around the tribe's plan to open an off-reservation casino.

Rick Pluta, Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, joined us today from D.C.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:41 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Is Detroit eligible for bankruptcy protection? We'll find out tomorrow

Joy VanBuhler Flickr

Tomorrow will be one for the history books, not just here in Michigan but across the nation.

Tuesday morning is when Federal Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes will rule whether or not Detroit is eligible for Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection.

Detroit News reporter Chad Livengood has covered the bankruptcy trial, and he joined us today to talk about what might happen tomorrow morning.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:39 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Meet indie-folk group The Accidentals

Katie Larson and Savannah Buist
Facebook

Popular music has had stellar examples of singer/songwriters who met in school...whose partnership began at a very young age.

John Lennon and Paul McCartney met when John was 16 and Paul was just 15. Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel met in grade school. They were 12 years old and had their first hit record, "Hey Schoolgirl," when they were just 16 years old.

Now we want you to meet a Michigan duo who are getting a lot of buzz for their indie-folk songs, The Accidentals.

The Accidentals are Katie Larson and Savannah Buist, who met at the Interlochen Arts Academy. They are 18 years old, and they joined us today from Traverse City.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
2:13 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Will new legislation stop another deadly meningitis outbreak?

cdc.gov

Congress has passed new legislation to try to prevent another deadly fungal meningitis outbreak... But, will it be enough?

*Listen to the audio above.

Stateside
2:07 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Learning more about the Amish in Michigan

user shirl wikimedia commons

When you think of "The Amish" what comes to mind?

Horses? Buggies? Long dresses and bonnets? Long beards? No electricity?

Well, yes, there is all of that. But there is so much more to the Amish in America, and here in Michigan, where the Amish population numbers around 11,000.

We wanted to find out more about the Amish -- especially what the rest of us might learn from them.

Consider this: how does a one-room Amish schoolhouse - going only to eighth grade, with only a battery-powered clock in the way of "technology" - how do these schools turn out highly successful entrepreneurs whose firms gross annual sales in the million-dollar range?

I'm joined by Gertrude Enders Huntington joined us today. She’s a retired professor from the University of Michigan. She is the co-author of "Amish Children: Education in the Family, School, and Community.”

*Listen to the audio above.

Politics & Culture
1:57 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

On today's show, Amish in Michigan, Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr., an update on pharmaceutical compounding centers in the wake of the meningitis outbreak, and preserving the classic turkey.

*Listen to the audio above.

Politics & Culture
4:44 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

Some new data from the Census Bureau shows some intriguing migration patterns. Can you guess who's moving to Michigan, and where Michiganders are heading when they pack up and leave?

We’ll talk with demographer Kurt Metzger about what these trends mean for Michigan. Then, should we be mixing our private and professional lives? An intriguing study suggests you might want to think twice before putting up those cute family photos at work.

And, it’s official, Uncle Sam is pulling out of General Motors, and with the exit of the federal government by the end of the year, it's the end of “Government Motors.”

Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes has plenty of thoughts about the pros and cons of the auto bailout, which stands as an unprecedented government intervention in a cornerstone industry.

Stateside
4:42 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

How co-workers view 'personal expressions' of their colleagues at work

Nearly half of the Detroit workforce lack the basic skills needed by employers
sideshowmom Morgue File

Ask anyone here at Michigan Radio who walks by my cubicle: I love my husband, kids and grandson. I love the countryside in County Cork Ireland, and I love Roger Daltrey of The Who.

Why do they know that?

Because all around my desk, I've tacked up photos of my family, of the fields of West Cork, and of my meeting with the legendary Who singer.

It's something I've always done at my desks throughout my career.

But an intriguing study by University of Michigan researchers suggests I might not be doing myself a favor with such "visible expressions" of my personal life.

Joining me is one of the five co-authors of the research paper, set for publication in the Journal of Organizational Behavior.

Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks is an Associate Professor of Management and Organizations at the Ross School of Business at UofM.

Stateside
4:42 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Data Driven Detroit talks to us about where Michiganders new and old are heading

comedy_nose flickr

Interesting data released by the Census Bureau is shedding some light on the question of who's moving to Michigan, and where Michigan folks are heading when they pack up and leave the Great Lakes State.

Let's take a closer look at these comings and goings and what it means for the state's future. We welcomed Kurt Metzger, director emeritus of Data Driven Detroit, and the newly elected Mayor of Pleasant Ridge.

Stateside
4:37 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Ann Arbor school finds a creative way to teach kids music

The Detroit Symphony musicians and the DSO management have agreed to meet
Zuu Mumu Entertainment Flickr

All too often, as school districts are forced to cut spending, programs like music get the ax.

And that sorry fact robs students of the chance to learn music, to make music, and leaves one to wonder: Where are the musicians of the future going to come from?

One Ann Arbor Elementary School is teaming up with the University of Michigan School of Music for a unique approach to teaching music...and they are turning to Venezuela for inspiration.

It's called El Sistema.

The program originated in Venezuela, and the idea was to teach disadvantaged children, to help them discoverer the power of music.

I spoke with Professor John Ellis with the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre and Dance, where among other things, he is Director of Community and Preparatory Programs - and Horacio Contreras Espionoza, he is a UofM grad student studying cello, and he is an El Sistema teacher at Mitchell Elementary School in Ann Arbor.

Stateside
4:31 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

The Jewish contribution to American cooking

Part of the cover of the More than Matzo Balls cookbook by the 2010 National Council of Jewish Women, St. Louis Section.
Courtesy of the University of Michigan Library

 

There's an exhibit going on now  through December 8 at the Hatcher Graduate Library at the University of Michigan. It's entitled "American Foodways: The Jewish Contribution."

Janice Bluestein Longone is the co-curator of the university's new exhibit.

She has spent more than four decades creating a 25,000-item library of American culinary literature -- one of the largest, most acclaimed private collections in the world.

But, Jan says she was surprised by the outpouring of support she received from the Jewish community.

Transportation
4:18 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Winter storm on its way during the holiday

Thanksgiving doesn't just  mean Turkey, it also means travel.

AAA figures that over 43 million of us will travel at least 50 miles from home during the upcoming holiday weekend.

And Mother Nature plans to hit much of the nation with a big, dangerous winter storm this week.

MLive Meteorologist Mark Torregrossa joins us now.

Stateside
4:12 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Heidelberg fires in Detroit energize Tyree Guyton to make more art

Emily Fox Michigan Radio

An open air art installation in Detroit has become the subject of a suspected arson rampage.

It's had 6 suspicious fires in 7 months.

The fires have demolished several homes that are key to the art project, but the artist behind the project says he’s energized by the wreckage and is ready to begin another stage of his art project.

The Heidelberg Project is on the east side of Detroit and takes over two city blocks.

Read more
Stateside
5:03 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

What would happen if the US and Canada merged together into one big country?

User: dmealiffe flickr.com

If you live in Michigan, particularly the Eastern Upper Peninsula and the Southeast Lower Peninsula, chances are high that you’ve crossed the border into Canada. We certainly know that our Canadian neighbors are heading over here in hefty numbers. A check of license plates at Metro Detroit shopping centers makes a strong case.

Our next guest makes a case for taking these two large countries and merging them into one. She believes the two would become much stronger for joining together.

She is currently Editor at Large at the National Post, a blogger for the Huffington Post, and a Distinguished Professor at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management in Toronto. Her nine earlier books focused on politics, immigration, economics and finance and white collar crime.

Her newest book is “Merger of the Century: Why Canada and America Should Become One Country.”

Author Diane Francis joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:01 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

The GOP cares about Detroit, they are building new 'African-American Engagement Office' to prove it

Dennis Lennox
Twitter

The Republican Party wants Detroit to know it cares. The GOP is hoping to increase its presence in the city where Barack Obama grabbed 97.5% of the vote in 2012.

And, how is the GOP going to reach out to Detroiters? By sending in Senator Rand Paul, tea party senator from Kentucky, to headline the opening of the new GOP outreach center, which is named "The African-American Engagement Office."

This has at least one Republican stalwart cringing. Dennis Lennox, GOP strategist and columnist at the Morning Sun, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:54 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Domestic workers are critical to our economy, so why are they invisible?

A poster in the The Workers Institute at The Black Country Living Museum.
Flickr user jo-marshall (was Jo-h) Flickr

There has been virtually no end to the stories focusing on the "Lean In" concept put forth by then- C.O.O of Facebook Sheryl Sandburg, focusing on whether highly talented and visible---and basically well-off---women could "have it all.”

But, as writer Laurie Penny wrote in The New Statesman, "While we all worry about the glass ceiling, there are millions of women standing in the basement---and the basement is flooding."

Domestic workers. The people that come into our homes to cook, clean, nanny or provide health care. Historically, many of these workers were African American women who were servants to families.

Today, household workers are critical to our economy, but all too often they're the invisible and underpaid part of society.

Why are they so invisible and what needs to happen to lift them out of that "flooding basement?"

Dr. Eileen Boris is the Hull Professor and Chair, Department of Feminist Studies and a Professor of History, Black Studies, and Global Studies at the University of California Santa Barbara. She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:52 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Detroit called 'post-apocalyptic' by city outsiders

Dave Linabury Flickr

As Detroit has slid its way down the slippery slope to bankruptcy, the eyes of the world have been fixed on the Motor City.

Whether it was Time Magazine renting a house for embedded reporters, Bob Simon of 60 Minutes comparing Detroit to Mogadishu, chef Anthony Bourdain comparing Detroit to Chernobyl, using the description "post-apocalyptic," the outsiders' view of Detroit has been, to put it gently, negative.

Our next guest has raised the question: what happened when outsiders are shaping Detroit's narrative? When Detroit and its leaders and stakeholders can't articulate a consistent message, someone else is going to do it. And how is that Narrative-Shaped-By-Outsiders going to affect Detroit's destiny?

Detroit Free Press Staff Writer Mark Stryker explored this in a recent piece "Seeking Detroit's Voice: Lack of message lets others shape the narrative." He joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

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