Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Stateside
5:25 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Kevyn Orr plans to hire a group to manage federal grant money

Detroit's emergency manager, Kevyn Orr.
Detroit Free Press video Detroit Free Press

An interview with Detroit News Washington Bureau Chief David Shepardson.

Detroit's emergency manager Kevyn Orr is looking to hire a group to oversee Detroit's federal grant money.

This comes at the same time that federal officials are searching for ways to offer more aid to Detroit.

Orr went to Washington D.C. earlier this month to visit with Michigan Senator Carl Levin  and some economists to get ideas about which grants programs would be best for the city.

Detroit News Washington Bureau Chief David Shepardson reported on this in today's Detroit News, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:23 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

Today we took a closer look at recommendations for statewide standards for evaluating Michigan teachers. How should the job performance of teachers be evaluated?

And, we met a West Michigan man who swims across the Great Lakes and Lake St Clair, raising money for charity.

Also, we spoke with the lead vocalist of The Ragbirds, a band from Ann Arbor that is about to kick off their fall tour with a newborn baby.

First on the show, Detroit's emergency manager Kevyn Orr is looking to hire a group to oversee Detroit's federal grant money.

This comes at the same time that federal officials are searching for ways to offer more aid to Detroit.

Orr visited went to Washington D.C. earlier this month to meet with Michigan Senator Carl Levin and some economists to get ideas about which grants programs would be best for the city.

Detroit News Washington Bureau Chief David Shepardson reported on this in today's Detroit News, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:46 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Recommendations for state-wide teacher evaluations have been issued

user kconnors morgueFile

An interview with Jennifer Hammond and Robert Stephenson.

How should the job performance of Michigan teachers be evaluated? What should the standard be? Should there be a state-wide common standard used to evaluate teachers?

Those were some of the key questions tackled by the Michigan Council for Educator Effectiveness. The temporary body recently came out with its recommendations for a new statewide teacher evaluation tool.

The Council is recommending that by 2015-16, half of a teacher’s evaluation should be based on classroom practices and the other half on student growth as determined by scores on tests.

The panel also is recommending that a teacher be dismissed after two years of ineffective ratings.

Read more
Stateside
5:39 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

One possible solution for Detroit: attract more immigrants

Steve Tobocman
globaldetroit.com

An interview with Steve Tobocman, the director of Global Detroit.

When you consider all of the possible "fixes" being discussed for struggling big cities like Detroit, there is an idea being offered up that has truly stood the test of time: attract more immigrants.

It's the way cities have been built all through American history. Open the doors to people who are hungry for new opportunities, for a new life, and watch them pour their energies into building new businesses, improving their homes and neighborhoods, attracting more new residents as family members follow from the Old Country.

But immigrants are not coming to Detroit, and that is something Steve Tobocman hopes to change.

He is the director of Global Detroit. So far, they've launched over a half dozen distinct initiatives to make Southeast Michigan---and Detroit---more welcoming to immigrants.

Steve Tobocman joined us today to talk about the program.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:37 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Assessing the entrepreneurial climate of Michigan

Paul Iseley
gvsu.edu

An interview with Paul Iseley, chairman of the economics department at GVSU's Seidman College of Business.

What's the state of entrepreneurship in West Michigan?

That's the question tackled in a new report from Grand Valley State University's Seidman College of Business. It finds that in just four years, there's been a big change in the way people think about being entrepreneurs.

We wanted to take a closer look at that changing mindset and find out what it means not only for West Michigan, but for the state.

Paul Iseley is chairman of the economics department at Grand Valley State's Seidman College of Business. He joined us today from GVSU.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:37 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Why do so many Michigan parents refuse to have their kids vaccinated?

Michigan now has the fourth highest rate in the U.S. of parents who do not get their children vaccinated.
user mconnors morgueFile

An interview with Oakland County pediatrician Dr. Martin Levinson.

Michigan now has the fourth highest rate in the nation of parents who do not have their children vaccinated for religious, medical and other reasons. Many simply don’t get all the immunization shots required.

Despite adamant statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the U.S. Centers of Disease Control that vaccines have no link to autism, an anti-vaccination movement is growing online, from parent to parent, and through activist celebrities, such as actress Jenny McCarthy.

August is National Immunization Awareness Month and physicians are mounting fresh efforts  to get more Michigan children fully vaccinated.

This vaccination push begins as the number of children falling ill with preventable diseases is on the rise.

We wanted to see how this story is being played out in the exam rooms of a busy pediatric practice, day-in and day out. Oakland County pediatrician Dr. Martin Levinson has been practicing medicine for 33 years. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:35 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Stateside for Monday, August 12th, 2013

Entrepreneurship is on the rise in West Michigan. We took a look at what this means for the Grand Rapids area and the rest of the state.

And, when you consider all of the possible "fixes" being discussed for struggling big cities like Detroit, there is an idea being offered up that has truly stood the test of time: attract more immigrants.

Also, we heard how a University of Michigan professor is using archeology to tell the story of undocumented immigrants crossing the border from Mexico into the U.S.

First on the show,  Michigan now has the fourth highest rate in the nation of parents who do not have their children vaccinated for religious, medical and other reasons. Many simply don’t get all the immunization shots required.

Despite adamant statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the U.S. Centers of Disease Control that vaccines have no link to autism, an anti-vaccination movement is growing online, from parent to parent, and through activist celebrities, such as actress Jenny McCarthy.

August is National Immunization Awareness Month and physicians are mounting fresh efforts  to get more Michigan children fully vaccinated.

This vaccination push begins as the number of children falling ill with preventable diseases is on the rise.

We wanted to see how this story is being played out in the exam rooms of a busy pediatric practice, day-in and day out. Oakland County pediatrician Dr. Martin Levinson has been practicing medicine for 33 years. He joined us today.

Stateside
5:21 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

The Undocumented Migration Project uses archeology to tell migrant's stories

Jason De León, director of the Undocumented Migrantion Project
lsa.umich.edu

An interview with Jason De León, the director of the Undocumented Migration Project.

It was the mid 1990's when the United States began an immigration enforcement strategy called Prevention Through Deterrence, or PTD.

It consisted of boosting security in unauthorized crossing areas surrounding major border cities with the idea that undocumented migrants would have to shift towards remote border regions where crossing conditions are much more difficult -- places like the Sonoran Desert in southern Arizona.

Two decades later, it's clear that PTD has failed to deter undocumented migrants.

The smuggling industry in northern Mexico has grown to serve the migrants, and here in the U.S., the movement to reform our broken immigration system is growing with bipartisan support.

But what of the life stories of these migrants?

That question has led Jason De León to apply his scientific training in anthropology and archeology to discovering the thousands of stories of these migrants.

De León is a professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan and he's the director of the Undocumented Migration Project.

Read more
Stateside
5:46 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Michigan has its fair share of UFO sightings, but Ohio takes the cake

Flickr user © Stranger Flickr

An interview with Rudi Lindner, a professor of History and Astronomy at the University of Michigan.

If you are a baby-boomer who grew up in Michigan, chances are good you remember a particular point in time when you were out in your backyard, peering into the night sky, searching for UFOs.

For one week in March of 1966, Michigan was awash with reports of UFO sightings. Scores of people called police to report suspicious items in the sky. Ultimately, the Air Force dismissed these sightings as nothing more than "swamp gas," causing then-Congressman Gerald Ford to fire off an indignant statement, declaring that people deserved a better explanation than something as laughable as "swamp gas."

Rudi Lindner is a professor of History and Astronomy at the University of Michigan. He teaches a class called "Discovery of the Universe" that includes the history of UFOs.

Read more
Politics & Culture
5:33 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, August 8th, 2013

Very few people have experienced life on Antarctica, but a Michigan-born film director spent a year on the continent. On today's show: a conversation about his new film No Horizon Anymore: A Yearlong Journey to the South Pole.

And, we spoke to an astronomy professor from the University of Michigan about the history of UFOs in Michigan.

Also, is there a shortage of skilled workers in Michigan? Rick Haglund joined us to explain why there is no clear answer. 

First on the show, the primary election of 2013 is history. Now the focus shifts to the November general election.

For the two candidates who want to become Detroit's next mayor, it's time to take stock of the harsh realities facing the city and craft a clear campaign message that addresses those stark truths.

Stephen Henderson has been issuing that challenge from the pages of the Detroit Free Press throughout the campaign, and now that the two challengers have emerged from the primary, we wanted to get his thoughts.

Stephen Henderson, the Editorial Page Editor of the Detroit Free Press, joined us today.

Stateside
5:32 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Michigan film director documents his year in Antarctica

Keith Reimink
Blogger

An interview with director Keith Reimink.

From growing up in Zeeland on Michigan's West Side to cooking for scientists at the South Pole, Keith Reimink has led a life that is, to say the least, fascinating.

Keith's job as a cook led him to spend a year at an Antarctic research center. He turned that experience into a documentary called "No Horizon Anymore."

Keith Reimink joined us today to talk about the experience.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:31 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Are there enough skilled workers in Michigan?

Author Joel Kotkin says Michigan needs more mid-level workers, like welders, plumbers, machinists and office workers.
earl53 Morguefile

An interview with Rick Haglund.

Is there a shortage of skilled workers in Michigan?

Now that the recession is in our rearview mirror, are there enough tool-and-dye makers and machine operators and welders and the like to meet employer demands?

The answer is not a clear "yes" or "no" as Rick Haglund discovered in his piece for MLive.

It’s headlined “Why Employers Have Difficulty Filling Skilled Trades Jobs.”

Rick Haglund joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:42 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Detroit's mayoral candidates need to face the city's harsh reality

Patricia Drury Flickr

An interview with Stephen Henderson, the editorial page editor of the Detroit Free Press.

The primary election of 2013 is history. Now the focus shifts to the November general election.

For the two candidates who want to become Detroit's next mayor, it's time to take stock of the harsh realities facing the city and craft a clear campaign message that addresses those stark truths.

Stephen Henderson has been issuing that challenge from the pages of the Detroit Free Press throughout the campaign, and now that the two challengers have emerged from the primary, we wanted to get his thoughts.

Stephen Henderson, the editorial page editor of the Detroit Free Press, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:13 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

There are calls in Lansing to overhaul Michigan’s parole system. Advocates say the state keeps people in prison far longer than necessary.

And, we went back in time to explore how a Michigan company fed the nation's craze for sending postcards.

Also, we spoke with meteorologist Mark Torregrossa about improvements in weather forecasting technology.

First on the show, Detroit voters have spoken. Well, at least the 15% or so who voted in Tuesday's primary.

And, it will be Mike Duggan versus Benny Napoleon in the race for Mayor. We'll talk with our political commentator Jack Lessenberry to get his take on the primary results. But first, let's talk with the candidates.

We were joined today by the top vote-getter in yesterday's mayoral primary, a candidate whose name wasn't even on the ballot, Mike Duggan.

Stateside
5:11 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Michigan weather forecasts could double in accuracy

Meteorologist Mark Torregrossa
Twitter

An interview with meteorologist Mark Torregrossa.

Have you heard the rueful little wisecrack about Michigan's weather forecasters?

Something like, "they're wrong just enough that you don't take them seriously and they're right just enough that you need to take them seriously."

Well, the weather forecasters in Michigan will soon be able to give us forecasts that are twice as accurate.

Mark Torregrossa got his degree in meteorology from Northern Illinois University and he's been forecasting Michigan's weather for more than two decades. His weather website, farmerweather.com specializes in weather information for farmers and agriculture.

Torregrossa joined us today to discuss forecasting technology.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:07 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Detroit voters have spoken, now what?

An interview with Michigan Radio's political commentator Jack Lessenberry.

Detroit voters have spoken.

Well, at least 15% of so of them have, the percentage who voted in yesterday's primary.

And it will be Mike Duggan versus Benny Napoleon in the race for Mayor.

Despite being booted off the ballot, and being forced to launch a write-in candidacy, Mike Duggan was by far the most popular choice, with more than 44,395 of the 50,328 write-in ballots that were cast. We should note, Tuesday's election numbers won't be official until certified by county canvassers.

Michigan Radio's political commentator Jack Lessenberry joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:43 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Mike Duggan's plans for Detroit

Mike Duggan won the Detroit mayoral primary yesterday.
Mike Duggan Facebook

Mike Duggan is the winner of yesterday's mayoral primary in Detroit. He attributed his success to the 10,000 people he talked to at 'house parties' during his primary campaign.

"I was at 185 homes. I was in living rooms, and backyards, and church halls, and apartment complexes. They carried me up."

The former Detroit Medical Center CEO won the primary as a write-in candidate. 

"When everyone who votes for you has to figure out how to navigate the write-in process, it gives you an idea of the depth of commitment people have to do it."

Read more
Stateside
3:38 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

The history of the American postcard can be traced back to Detroit

Boston Public Library Flickr

An interview with photojournalist and filmmaker John Collier.

Sadly, posting a photo or video from your smartphone onto Facebook or Twitter seems to have supplanted the good old postcard.

But there is a rich history to the American Picture Postcard and it centers on Detroit.

The "City That Put the World on Wheels" is also the city that turned out millions and millions of American postcards.

John Collier spent three decades as a photojournalist for the Detroit Free Press.

He is also a filmmaker who has turned his love of postcards into a documentary that’s called “My Postcard Collection: The Detroit Publishing Story: A History of the American Picture Postcard.”

John Collier joined us today in the studio.

For more information, go to http://www.mypostcardcollection.net/

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
2:52 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Napoleon plans to move forward, undaunted by Duggan's strong showing in the polls

Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

An interview with Sheriff Benny Napoleon.

Detroit voters have spoken. Well, at least 15% or so of them who voted in yesterday's primary.

And it will be Mike Duggan versus Benny Napoleon in the race for Mayor.

We were joined by one of the two candidates who will be on the ballot in November running to be the next Mayor of Detroit, Sheriff Benny Napoleon.

Read more
Stateside
5:35 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Low voter turnout is expected in Detroit today

Voters cast their ballots in Michigan
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

An interview with Nancy Derringer, a writer for Bridge Magazine, and Karen Dumas, the former chief of communications for Detroit Mayor Dave Bing.

It's not uncommon for voter turnout to be lower on primary Election Days than on the big general Election Days in November.

But so much is at stake in Detroit's primary today. Voters will narrow the field in races for Mayor and City Council.

They'll be choosing a district-based council for the first time in nearly 100 years. These leaders will be working closely with emergency manager Kevyn Orr during the city's historic bankruptcy, and they will be running the show after Orr leaves.

So the need for competent, passionate elected officials is greater than ever, and yet, turnout at the polls in Detroit is expected to be in the 15-17% range.

We wanted to talk about what's behind that chronically low number. Could it be something besides disaffected, uninvolved residents?

Nancy Derringer, a writer for Bridge Magazine, and Karen Dumas, the former chief of communications for Detroit Mayor Dave Bing and a communications/PR strategist, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

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