Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Stateside
5:33 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Spelling counts for the Detroit mayor write-in candidates

Mike Duggan

An interview with Rick Pluta, Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network.

There are 14 names on the ballot for Detroit mayor, but one of the widely-seen front-runners doesn't even have his name on it. That would be former Detroit Medical Center CEO Mike Duggan. Duggan is running a write-in campaign.

But, in the final weeks of the campaign, another man, a barber in Detroit, decided he too would run a write-in campaign for Mayor. His name is Mike Dugeon.

So, this is an election where spelling counts.

Rick Pluta, Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, joined us today to talk about these write-in candidates.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:30 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Michigan has one of world's few 'dark sky parks' for stargazers

Headlands International Dark Sky Park
Facebook

An interview with Mary Stewart Adams, the program director at the Headlands International Dark Sky Park.

If you live in the city or the suburbs and you travel to the country, the first thing that often strikes you after the sun goes down is the incredible show in the night skies.

The difference between what city-dwellers see each night, and the same sky when you're on the shore of Lake Michigan in Emmett County is unbelievable.

That's the magic behind the Headlands International Dark Sky Park, a 600 acre park along the shore of Lake Michigan near Mackinaw City.

It's one of only 10 designated dark sky parks in the world.

Mary Stewart Adams, the program director at the Headlands International Dark Sky Park, joined us from Emmett County.

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Stateside
5:21 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Where are the 'cancer hot spots' in Michigan?

Cancer cells
NCI

An interview with journalist Norm Sinclair.

Michigan's cancer profile can cause unease, especially if you live or work near polluted waterways or land. Federal health data show that where you live might determine whether you will get cancer and what type.

Journalist Norm Sinclair looked at the "cancer hot spots" in Michigan for the August issue of DBusiness magazine, and he joined us today from Oakland County.

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Politics & Culture
5:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

Federal health data show that where you live may determine whether you will get cancer and what type.

On today’s show, we explored Michigan's cancer profile.

And, we traveled to the Headlands International Dark Sky Park near Mackinac City, one of only 10 designated sky parks in the entire world.

Also, we spoke with Rick Pluta about the write-in candidates in Detroit’s primary election.

First on the show, it's not uncommon for voter turnout to be lower on primary Election Days than on the big general Election Days in November, but so much is at stake in Detroit's primary today.

Voters will narrow the field in races for Mayor and City Council.

They'll be choosing a district-based council for the first time in nearly 100 years. These leaders will be working closely with emergency manager Kevyn Orr during the city's historic bankruptcy, and they will be running the show after Orr leaves.

So the need for competent, passionate elected officials is greater than ever, and yet, turnout at the polls in Detroit is expected to be in the 15-17% range.

We wanted to talk about what's behind that chronically low number. Could it be something besides disaffected, uninvolved residents?

Nancy Derringer, a writer for Bridge Magazine, and Karen Dumas, the former chief of communications for Detroit Mayor Dave Bing and a communications/PR strategist, joined us today.

Stateside
5:19 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Detroit could play a part in a metropolitan revolution

Detroit skyline seen from Windsor, Ontario, across the Detroit River.
Bernt Rostad creative commons

An interview with Bruce Katz, vice president at the Brookings Institution and founding director of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program.

Ever since the news broke that Detroit had filed for bankruptcy, there has been a tidal wave of stories about the Motor City sent to all corners of the world. A city in ruin. Street lights that don’t work. Police response times of nearly an hour. Broken fire rigs and no money for repairs. Abandoned buildings.

But the next guest believes that this historic bankruptcy provides not only new challenges, but new opportunities to hit the “reset” button and build a city core that can be vibrant and strong, hopefully strong enough to lift up other regions of the city.

Bruce Katz is a vice president at the Brookings Institution and founding director of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program.

Along with Jennifer Bradley, he is co-author of the new book “The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros are Fixing our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy.”

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Stateside
5:17 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Michigan and China have a strong economic connection, and it's growing stronger

Philip Jägenstedt Flickr

An interview with Tom Watkins, the former State School Superintendent and former State Mental Health Director, and Michael Barris, a reporter from the China Daily’s U.S. edition.

When it comes to economic growth and finding an economic partner, it seems that Michigan and China are discovering a lot to like about each other.

Look at the numbers:  last year, Michigan exported $3.2 billion worth of goods and services to China, just behind Canada and Mexico. And Michigan is one of the top ten states for direct investment from China. We were on the receiving end of more than $917 million in capitol from China in 2012.

Tom Watkins is the former State School Superintendent and former State Mental Health Director, and a frequent traveler to China. And Michael Barris is a reporter from the China Daily’s U.S. edition.

They joined us today to talk about what China and Michigan have to offer each other.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:16 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

A preview of tomorrow's Detroit primary

Detroit's skyline.
Peter Martorano Flickr

An interview with Detroit Free Press editorial writer Nancy Kaffer.

Tomorrow is primary election day.

Detroit's primary is getting most of the attention, but there are local elections happening in many areas of the state on Tuesday.

In Flint, voters are choosing among two dozen candidates to fill largely powerless city council seats.

Flint has been under the control of an emergency manager since December of 2011. But while Flint city council members wield little power now, that may soon change.

Flint is taking steps to come out from under state oversight and that could happen late next year, so the Flint city council members elected from the field of Tuesday’s primary candidates may eventually have actual power to shape their city.

Voters are also casting primary ballots in parts of Lansing, Jackson, Grand Rapids and Ann Arbor.

In all, voters in more than 50 Michigan counties will be casting ballots on Tuesday.

In Detroit, the stakes have never been higher because of the bankruptcy.

Detroit Free Press editorial writer Nancy Kaffer joined us today to give us a preview of the election.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:12 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Stateside for Monday, August 5th, 2013

When it comes to economic growth and finding an economic partner, it seems Michigan and China have a serious relationship. Last year, Michigan exported more than $3 billion worth of goods and services to China, only behind Canada and Mexico. We took a look at these economic ties and what they mean for the future.

And, we met a 17-year-old who is trying to keep her community clean, one trash bag at a time.

Also, we spoke with Bruce Katz, vice president of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program and co-author of the new book “The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros are Fixing our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy,” about rebuilding Detroit.

First on the show, tomorrow is primary election day. Detroit's primary is getting most of the attention, but there are local elections happening in many areas of the state on Tuesday.

In Flint, voters are choosing among two dozen candidates to fill largely powerless city council seats.

Flint has been under the control of an emergency manager since December of 2011. But while Flint city council members wield little power now, that may soon change.

Flint is taking steps to come out from under state oversight and that could happen late next year, so the Flint city council members elected from the field of Tuesday’s primary candidates may eventually have actual power to shape their city.

Voters are also casting primary ballots in parts of Lansing, Jackson, Grand Rapids and Ann Arbor.

In all, voters in more than 50 Michigan counties will be casting ballots on Tuesday.

In Detroit, the stakes have never been higher because of the bankruptcy.

Detroit Free Press editorial writer Nancy Kaffer joined us today to give us a preview of the election.

Stateside
3:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Oakland County teen gets recognized for her efforts to clean up her community

http://www.actionfornature.org/

An interview with Brianna Moore, winner of an International Young Eco-Hero Award.

When you're walking in your favorite park, what do you do when you see trash? Plastic bags, empty bottles, and cigarette butts?

Chances are most of us would shake our heads in dismay at the nerve of someone who would deliberately litter like that and keep on walking.

We wanted you to meet an Oakland County teenager who doesn't just keep on walking. She puts on her rubber gloves and picks up other peoples' trash.

17 year old Brianna Moore has just been recognized by a San Francisco group called "Action For Nature." They've given Briana an International Young Eco-Hero Award for her efforts to clean up her community.

Brianna Moore joined us today from her home in Oak Park.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:41 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, August 1st, 2013

People around the world and right here in Michigan are rethinking money in order to ease financial woes, and they're doing it with local currency. On today's show we found out what it is, and where it's working.

And, we headed up north to a resort town where a vacation can lead to putting down roots and building a business.

Also, one of the co-founders of The Artist Lounge joined us to tell us about how her business is breathing new life into Pontiac.

And, the Farm Bill and food stamp programs expire at the end of September. We took a closer look at what this means for Michiganders receiving federal food assistance.

Also, we spoke with Micki Maynard about what she thinks the future of personal transportation will look like.

First on the show, a State Senate panel has voted to make more than 300,000 Michiganders eligible for Medicaid in 2014. And that's not all: the GOP-led Government Operations Committee said yes to two alternative plans.

So, from the Senate ticking off Governor Snyder by adjourning without voting on the House-passed Medicaid expansion plan to this Senate Panel serving up not one, not two, but three Medicaid proposals, it's a lot to keep track of.

We turned to Michigan Public Radio Network's Lansing reporter Jake Neher for a little help in sorting this all out.

Stateside
5:36 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Artist Lounge creator wants to use art to improve Pontiac community

Wendelin Wilson and Wendy Fournier, founders of The Artist Lounge.
Facebook

An interview with Wendy Fournier, co-founder of The Artist Lounge.

Bringing new life back into downtown Pontiac one brushstroke at a time.

That’s the mission of a new business called “The Artist Lounge,” which strives to use the power of art to touch lives and boost an Oakland County city that has had its share of struggles.

Wendy Fournier is the co-founder of The Artist Lounge on Saginaw Street in downtown Pontiac. She joined us today to talk about what The Artist Lounge offers to people in the Pontiac area.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:30 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Bay Bucks: The local currency of Traverse City

The front and back of a 20 Bay Bucks note.
deepwoodpress.com

An interview with Dena Ames, a Traverse City resident.

Today on Stateside, we talked with currency expert, journalist, and author Jacqui Dunne about local currencies. In case you're still a little unclear as to how a local currency would work in everyday life, we found out more about it.

Dena Ames is a Traverse City resident. She works at Oryana Natural Food Market where they use and exchange a local currency called Bay Bucks.

Dena Ames joined us today from Traverse City to talk about how Bay Bucks are helping the local economy.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:26 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

The future of personal transportation might not include cars

Micki Maynard

An interview with writer Micki Maynard.

What does the future hold for the way we get from Point A to Point B?

Writer Micki Maynard is looking at what's happening all around the country in terms of personal transportation and she sees big changes on the way.

Micki is the former Detroit bureau chief for the New York Times and she has authored four books, including "The End of Detroit: How the Big Three Lost Their Grip on the American Car Industry."

And now she's got a new project in the works, a proposed e-book called "Curbing Cars."

Micki Maynard joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:08 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Senate panel approves Medicaid expansion, as well as alternative plans

The Michigan Senate
user cedarbenddrive Flickr

An interview with Michigan Public Radio Network's Lansing reporter Jake Neher.

A State Senate panel has voted to make more than 300,000 Michiganders eligible for Medicaid in 2014. And that's not all: the GOP-led Government Operations Committee said yes to two alternative plans.

So, from the Senate ticking off Governor Snyder by adjourning without voting on the House-passed Medicaid expansion plan, to this Senate Panel serving up not one, not two, but three Medicaid proposals, it's a lot to keep track of.

We turned to Michigan Public Radio Network's Lansing reporter Jake Neher for a little help in sorting this all out.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:02 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

What does the Farm Bill mean for Michiganders receiving food assistance?

Funding for the food stamp program is part of the federal Farm Bill.
Brandon Shigeta Google images

An interview with Melissa Smith, a senior policy analyst for the Michigan League of Public Policy.

The federal Farm Bill is the focus of the latest political battle on Capitol Hill. And in that fight rests the future of SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

1.7 million people here in Michigan and 47.5 million people nationwide receive federal help to buy food. Spending and participation in the food stamp program is at an all-time high.

Funding for the food stamp program is part of the big five-year Farm Bill. Both the House and Senate have approved Farm Bills, but there's a big gulf between the two versions.

The Senate's version would cut about $4 billion from food assistance programs. Senate Democrats say that would root out waste but not strand people in need.

The House version would have cut much deeper, around $20 billion. House Republicans say now that the economy is recovering, food assistance can be cut back, and they maintain that President Obama's expansion of food aid during the recession went well beyond what was truly needed. GOP House leaders stripped food aid out of its farm bill to get it passed.

So now what? The clock is ticking, because the Farm Bill and food stamp programs expire at the end of September.

What does this all mean for those Michiganders who receive federal food assistance?

Melissa Smith is a senior policy analyst for the Michigan League of Public Policy, a Lansing-based group that focuses on social services. She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Local currency one answer to Detroit's problems?

Currency expert, journalist, and author Jacqui Dunne.
Twitter

An interview with Jacqui Dunne, a currency expert and a journalist.

As Detroit makes unhappy history by becoming the biggest city in American history to file for Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection, the focus has been on money and how the city doesn't have enough of it to meet its crushing obligations.

There are financial experts who believe the troubles facing Detroit and many other cities and states is a warning, a warning that we as a society need to rethink our monetary system and look at the advantages of a local currency.

What's wrong with our current money system? And how would local currencies help solve many problems?

We turned to the co-author of the book "Rethinking Money: How New Currencies Turn Scarcity Into Prosperity" for answers. Jacqui Dunne is a currency expert and a journalist.

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Politics & Culture
6:16 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

The FBI has just completed a nationwide sweep resulting in the arrest of 150 pimps and the rescue of 105 children who had been forced into prostitution. We took a closer look at human trafficking in our state.

And, we spoke with Leigh Ann Ulrey, one of 30 college graduates to be selected for the Challenge Detroit program.

And, a new House bill could eliminate state income tax. State Representative Bob Genetski joined us to talk about why he thinks income tax is unnecessary.

Also, self-driving cars could be available to consumers within the next 2-3 years, according to Google. We found out what the future of transportation might look like.

First on the show, there was an important handshake this afternoon in Lansing.

UAW President Bob King shook hands with state government officials to officially launch the start of contract talks.

UAW Local 6000's contract with the state expires at the end of 2014. But the state needs to finalize the next contract by the end of this year in order to get it funded in next year's budget. Local 6000 represents 17,000 state employees.

Let's look at what the big issues might be in the negotiations.

Rick Pluta, Michigan Public Radio Network's Lansing bureau chief, joined us today.

Stateside
6:14 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

2013 labor negotiations started in Lansing today

UAW President Bob King (far left) looks on as UAW Vice President Cindy Estrada shakes hands with Michigan State Employer Jan Winter (right). The UAW is one of six state employee unions bargaining for a new contract that would take effect in 2015.
Rick Pluta Michigan Public Radio

An interview with Rick Pluta.

There was an important handshake this afternoon in Lansing.

UAW President Bob King shook hands with state government officials to officially launch the start of 2013 labor negotiations.

UAW Local 6000's contract with the state expires at the end of 2014. But the state needs to finalize the next contract by the end of this year in order to get it funded in next year's budget. Local 6000 represents 17,000 state employees.

Let's look at what the big issues might be in the negotiations.

Rick Pluta, Michigan Public Radio Network's Lansing bureau chief, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
6:11 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

The self-driving car is no longer a thing of fiction

A Google driverless car.
Wikipedia

An interview with Dr. Peter Sweatman and Richard Wallace.

Are you ready to let your car do the driving?

Once we thought of the self-driving car as something from science fiction. But technological breakthroughs have been coming at ever-increasing speeds.

Google expects its driverless car will be ready for consumers in the next 3-5 years. GM thinks intelligent vehicles will be on the roads by 2020. Ford predicts 2025.

And researchers at the University of Michigan are making sure the Great Lakes State is front-and-center in developing and testing the connected vehicle technology that is essential to the self-driving car.

The director of the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, Dr. Peter Sweatman, and Richard Wallace, the director of Transportation Systems Analysis for the Center for Automotive Research, joined us today to talk about the future of transportation.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
6:07 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

New bill could eliminate Michigan income tax

State Representative Bob Genetski
Photo courtesy of Rep. Genetski's office

An interview with State Representative Bob Genetski.

How would you like to say farewell to the state income tax?

State Representative Bob Genetski is a Republican from Saugatuck, and he thinks we should do just that.

He has introduced House Bill 4898, which Representative Genetski is calling the “Taxpayer Freedom Act,” and it would allow voters to decide whether to keep the state income tax or get rid of it.

Representative Bob Genetski joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

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