Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Stateside
3:09 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

New MSU exhibit presents hundreds of Alan Lomax Michigan folksongs

Alan Lomax
Wikipedia

 Famed folklorist Alan Lomax prowled through Michigan on his legendary 10 year cross-country trip, collecting American folk music for the Library of Congress. In that collection is a lively reel by a fiddler named Patrick Bonner recorded on Beaver Island, Michigan in 1938.

Now, Alan Lomax’s hundreds of Michigan recordings are being presented in a traveling exhibition from Michigan State University. It’s called Michigan Folksong Legacy: Grand Discoveries from the Great Depression.

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Stateside
10:15 am
Thu October 31, 2013

The history of Halloween in Michigan

Flickr user Terry.Tyson Flickr

 You drive around most neighborhoods these days and there is absolutely no doubt we love Halloween.

Once upon a time, you carved a pumpkin, popped in a candle and put it on your porch to greet trick or treaters.

Now, homes are decked out with giant webs and big spiders, ghouls and witches, and don't forget the lights. Halloween is now second only to Christmas for consumer spending.

Just when and where did this all begin? And how far back does Halloween go here in Michigan?

We turn to historian and contributor to the Detroit News Bill Loomis for the answers. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:22 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

Michigan is home to five national parks and there are lots of open spaces where you can camp, hunt and enjoy nature. But, yesterday, an Oklahoma Senator recently said two Michigan landmarks are a prime example of wasteful federal spending. We found out what’s behind the senator’s reasoning and whether there is some truth to his concerns.

 Then, we took a look at a new proposal by a group of Democrats in the Michigan House that would require the state to determine the actual cost of educating a public school student in Michigan. That got us thinking, shouldn't we already know?  We also spoke with Michigan writer Donald Lystra about his new collection of short stories. And, Ann Arbor now has its own Death Café, organized by funeral home guide Merilynne Rush. She stopped by to tell us more about it. But, first on the show, ever since the government unveiled its healthcare.gov website, the headlines surrounding the Affordable Care Act have been about the problems with the way the site was designed and the extreme difficulty Americans have had in getting on the exchange. But what about the Americans that don't need healthcare.gov? The ones who already have plans? To those consumers, President Obama has been saying this since 2009:

“If you like your current insurance, you will keep your current insurance. No government takeover, nobody’s changing what you’ve got if you’re happy with it.”

So why, then, then are some 2 million Americans - about 140,000 in Michigan - getting cancelation letters from their insurers over the past couple of weeks?

Marianne Udow-Phillips directs the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation, a non-profit partnership between the University of Michigan and Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Michigan. She joined us today.

Stateside
4:06 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Michigan author publishes new collection of short stories

Donald Lystra
Facebook

Short stories are in the spotlight in the literary world after Canadian writer Alice Munro recently won the 2013 Nobel Prize in literature. She's widely considered to be the "master of the short story."

The Michigan writer Donald Lystra is just out with his collection of short stories called "Something That Feels Like Truth."

Donald Lystra is an engineer who turned to writing later in life. His debut novel "Season of Water and Ice" won the Midwest Book Award and the Michigan Notable Book Award.

Donald Lystra joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
4:04 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Oklahoma senator points to two Michigan national parks as examples of 'wasteful' federal spending

Isle Royale nature trail.
Wikipedia

Two Michigan landmarks have been targeted by a Republican senator as prime examples of wasteful federal spending.

Each year, Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Oklahoma) issues a report on what he feels are the most egregious examples of government waste.

This report points to Isle Royale National Park in Lake Superior and Keweenaw National Historical Park in the UP as "wasteful" and not worthy of preservation.

Todd Spangler, Detroit Free Press Washington reporter joined us today to tell us what’s behind Sen. Coburn’s reasoning.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:31 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Why are millions of Americans losing health care coverage?

user mudowp Twitter

Ever since the government unveiled its healthcare.gov website, the headlines surrounding the Affordable Care Act have been about the problems with the way the site was designed and the extreme difficulty Americans have had in getting on the exchange to shop for health insurance.

But, what about the Americans that don't need healthcare.gov? The ones who already have plans? Some 14 million consumers buy their own insurance individually.

And to those consumers, President Obama has been saying this since 2009:

“If you like your current insurance, you will keep your current insurance. No government takeover, nobody’s changing what you’ve got if you’re happy with it.”

So why, then, are some 2 million Americans - about 140,000 in Michigan - getting cancelation letters from their insurers?

Marianne Udow-Phillips directs the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation, a non-profit partnership between the University of Michigan and Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Michigan. She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:27 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Ann Arbor has its own Death Cafe

Merilynne Rush
LinkedIn

It's probably safe to say most of us shy away from thinking about and talking about death.

As medical science has developed the technology to keep us alive longer it seems we have become more and more squeamish about death itself, even though - you got to admit - it is the one thing in life that happens to each and every one of us.

There is a movement trying to change that: the Death Café. Merilynne Rush is a home funeral guide, and she has brought the Death Café to Ann Arbor.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:25 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

How much does it cost to educate a student in Michigan public schools?

Last month, the Michigan House Democrats School Reform Task Force unveiled a new proposal that would require the State Department of Education to determine the actual cost of educating a public school student in Michigan.

That got us wondering: do we really not know how much it costs to educate a student in our state? And if so, why not?

Michael Addonizio is a professor of education at Wayne State University, and he joined us in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:12 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Want to learn Ojibwe? There's an app for that

Ever wanted to learn Ojibwe? Well, there’s an app for that.

The Ojibwe, also known as Anishinaabe people, make up one of the largest groups of Native Americans in the United States, with many living here in Michigan.

Darrick Baxter, president of Ogoki Learning Systems, helped design this free app that could go a long way towards keeping the Ojibwe language alive. 

Here's a video showing how the app works:

Listen to full interview above. 

Stateside
4:10 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Did the government shutdown hurt Michigan Republicans?

The U.S. Capitol.
user kulshrax Flickr

Now that the 16-day government shutdown has been solved — at least for the time being — analysts are trying to assess the political cost of the standoff between the White House and congressional Democrats versus Republicans, who attempted to derail funding for the Affordable Care Act as a condition for funding the rest of the government.

As the standoff dragged on, the country slid towards a fiscal default, Americans aimed their fury at Congress. And though polls show many expressed anger at all parties in the standoff — from the President to, essentially, everyone in the House and Senate — the brunt of citizen anger appeared aimed at Republicans.

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Politics & Culture
4:06 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

It appears the political buzz and chattering class have moved away from the government shutdown and the debate over the debt-ceiling to problems with the Affordable Care Act's website and allegations of NSA spying on U.S. allies.

But political operatives and campaign managers haven't moved on. They're continuing to focus on the shutdown, and how to make it work for them - for their campaigns - come 2014.On today's show we look at how Republicans in Michigan's Congressional delegation could feel the impact from a disastrous few weeks in D.C.And, then, trying to keep a language alive? There's an app for that. We talk to a man who's helped to design an app that will teach you Ojibwe - the language of some Ojibway living in Michigan.But first on the show we look at Flint's new Master Plan. It's the first one in more than 50 years.Last night, the Flint city council approved the plan, which calls for stabilizing neighborhoods hard hit by blight and creating new opportunity for business investment.Scott Kincaid is the President of the Flint City Council, and he likes it.

Read more
Stateside
4:01 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Father-daughter duo embark on new adventure — starting a band

Emily and San Slomovits
Arbor Web Arbor Web

An interview with San and Emily Slomovits.

Traditional wisdom has it that kids aren’t especially into their parents’ music.

But that’s not the case for Sandor and Emily Slomovits of Ann Arbor. Just this year Emily released an album with her father San, “Innocent When You Dream.”

The daughter-dad duo has been making the rounds, sharing the stage at venues like The Ark in Ann Arbor.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:00 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

The surprising history of the restaurant menu

A table at a restaurant.
user Biodun themedicalhealthplus.com

The surprising history of the restaurant menu

We've started noticing something when we've been going out to eat.

These days, instead of handing out a menu in the traditional plastic-coated paper, some restaurants are handing us iPads.

Chili's Grill and Bar has been testing tablets that allow diners to order their drinks, desserts and pay the bill without having to flag down a waiter. It's been so successful in the 180 or so test restaurants that the company plans to install tablet menus at most of its 1,266 restaurants in the United States.

In Ann Arbor, the Real Seafood Company recently began using tablet menus.

And that got us wondering about menus and going out to eat. What does the way a society eats at restaurants say about us?

Listen to full interview above.

Stateside
3:58 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Will this new plan help Flint grow?

Flint's skyline.
Flint Michigan Facebook.com

On Monday, the Flint City Council approved a new master plan — the first new plan in more than 50 years.

The plan calls for stabilizing neighborhoods hit hard by blight, and creating new opportunities for business investment.

City officials and residents have spent the last two years coming up with the plan. Flint, about 50 miles northwest of Detroit, has been under state oversight since 2011. The city currently is dealing with $3 million in structural debt.

Will this new plan help Flint grow?

Listen to full story above.

Politics & Culture
5:11 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

Stateside for Monday, October 28th, 2013

Prescription-free emergency contraception is supposed to be available over-the-counter, across the country, for women of all ages.

But, for some, where you live matters. On today's show we found out about the uneven access to Plan B in Native American communities.

And the Yankee Air Museum has been given more time as it tries to save part of an historic factory. Will the Willow Run bomber plant be saved?

And we met a woman using graffiti in a very unique way.

Have you heard “The Michigan Poem?” We spoke to the Kalamazoo performance duo who wrote it.

Also, we took a look at child passenger safety laws and how to keep kids safe during car rides.

First on the show, we turned to Detroit's Mayoral election. Voters in Michigan's largest city will head to the polls one week from tomorrow.

Within that race for Mayor  is the issue of race. There is a white candidate: Mike Duggan - former Detroit Medical Center CEO, and a black candidate: Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon.

As part of the Detroit Free Press' endorsement of a Mayoral candidate, our next guest penned yesterday's column in the Freep about the complex role that race is playing in this election.

Stephen Henderson is the Editorial Page Editor for the Detroit Free Press, and he joined us today.

Stateside
5:10 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

Midtown Detroit woman is turning graffiti into jewelry

These pendants were made from Detroit graffiti.
Facebook

"Defiant jewelry with a purpose!"

That's the slogan for a unique jewelry business that launched in the Midtown area of Detroit.

It's called Rebel Nell.

The goal? To turn actual pieces of graffiti found on the ground into jewelry. The company is hiring disadvantaged women, hoping to give them a hand-up from poverty and dependence.

Amy Peterson is a co-founder of Rebel Nell. She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:02 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

Making emergency contraception available to Native American women

The Plan B pill.
Flickr user meddygarnet Flickr

There are 12 recognized Native American tribes in Michigan- some 130,000 Native Americans who live throughout our state.

Michigan has the largest population of Native Americans east of the Mississippi.

And in that community---as well as across the nation -- one of the most urgent women's health issues has been access to emergency contraception.

For most American women, it takes a trip to the drug store and anywhere from $30-65 to get the so-called "morning after pill," also known as Plan B.

The dilemma for women who go to Indian Health Services facilities: they have no retail pharmacies, so American Indian and Alaska Native women who needed emergency contraception would have to deal with emergency rooms and urgent care clinics, and that usually adds up to long wait times.

And when you learn the frequency of sexual assault against Native American women, it becomes very clear why this issue is so important.

Although the Federal Government has given a verbal directive to Indian Health Services to give women over age 17 free access to Plan B, there's concern that this is not being evenly handled.

Charon Asetoyer is the founder and Executive Director of the Native American Community Board and the Native American Women's Health Education Resource Center located on the Yankton Sioux Reservation in Lake Andes, South Dakota.

She joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:49 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

How to keep your child safe during car rides

Miki Yoshihito Flickr

We can talk all we want about safety regulations, about child safety seats, which designs work best and why we should have children safely restrained in a traveling vehicle.

But all of that talk is trumped by the sometimes harsh realities of what doctors see in an emergency room. It's the physicians who see what happens when parents are careless about following safety laws, or when the laws themselves are not enough to protect children.

In 2012, more than 2,500 children under age 11 were hurt, and 16 youngsters died in car crashes. And that toll hasn't changed since 2005, despite advances in automotive design and child safety seats.

Why is this happening?

Dr. Michelle Macy, with the University of Michigan CS Mott Children's Hospital, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:35 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

The role of race in the Detroit mayoral election

Let's turn to Detroit's Mayoral election. Voters in Michigan's largest city will head to the polls one week from tomorrow.

Within that race for Mayor  is the issue of race. There is a white candidate: Mike Duggan - former Detroit Medical Center CEO, and a black candidate: Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon.

As part of the Detroit Free Press' endorsement of a Mayoral candidate, our next guest penned yesterday's column in the Freep about the complex role that race is playing in this election.

Stephen Henderson is the Editorial Page Editor for the Detroit Free Press and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:26 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

Efforts to save the histotric Willow Run bomber plant continue

The Wilow Run Factory was built in 5 months, and at the height of production during WWII, it was producing one B-24 bomber every hour.
U.S. Army Signal Corps

The Yankee Air Museum has been given more time as it tries to save part of an historic factory.

The former Willow Run Bomber plant in Ypsilanti is where Rosie the Riveter built B-24s during World War Two.

Dennis Norton is Chairman of the Yankee Air Museum, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

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