Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

Flickr user Dennis Skley / Flickr

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is expected to vote tomorrow on a proposal that could impact the way you use and pay for your Internet.

The debate is around "net neutrality."

 Today on Stateside: 

  • Congressman Dan Kildee discusses the Congressional stalemate surrounding immigration and the Department of Homeland Security funding.
  • Michigan DNR Wildlife biologist Kristin Bissell discusses approaches to combating urban and suburban deer disruptions.
user farlane / flickr

Anyone who enjoys Michigan wines should raise a glass in tribute to Len Olson.

Without Olson, Michigan might well not have its 107 fully operating wineries and its 15,000 acres of grapes.

This pioneer of Michigan's wine industry died late last year.

  Today on Stateside: 

  • Congressman Dan Kildee discusses the Congressional stalemate surrounding immigration and the Department of Homeland Security funding.
  • Wildlife biologist with the Michigan DNR Kristin Bissell discusses various approaches to combating urban and suburban deer disruptions.
Deer
Noel Zia Lee/Flickr

A recent community meeting in Ann Arbor illustrates a challenge urban areas throughout Michigan are facing: deer. Specifically, deer that are a road hazard or destroy parks and gardens.

Ann Arborites heard details of lethal or non-lethal ways to control the deer population.

A biologist from the city of Rochester Hills described his city's non-lethal program, relying on better road signage and much more community education.

Flickr user Maurizio Pesce / Flickr

As we talk about the auto industry, the "Detroit Three," it's all too easy to forget that these enormous companies began as scrappy little start-ups, birthed by innovators who were not afraid to set the status quo on its ear.

Photo courtesy of the Office of Congressman Dan Kildee

The clock is ticking. Funding for the Department of Homeland Security will run out Friday if Congress can't figure out how to separate the DHS budget from the politics of immigration reform.

House Republicans are using the DHS funding bill to try to repeal President Obama's executive actions on immigration. But there aren't enough votes in the Senate to pass that bill.

Not surprisingly, U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., disagrees with House Speaker John Boehner's assertions that President Obama's executive action on immigration was an overreach of his powers.

FLICKR USER ISAAC "AYE MIRA" SANCHEZ / FLICKR

Matt Green said that Grindr, perhaps the best-known location-based gay dating app, is not only about looking for love or hookups. It can also be a platform for finding spiritual, or even religious connections.

Hailing from Ann Arbor, Green is a second-year rabbinical student at New York City’s Hebrew Union College. He’s known as “The Grindr Rabbi” and uses Grindr to reach out to gay Jews in New York City.

Green said it all started when he came back from rabbinical school in Israel last year. He downloaded Grindr and posted to his profile that he was on his way to becoming a Rabbi.

Today on Stateside: 

  • MLive’s Capitol reporter Jonathan Oosting speaks with us about the Republican Winter Convention, that was held this weekend, and about Ronna Romney McDaniel, the newly elected GOP chair.
  •   Michigan Radio’s West Michigan reporter, Lindsey Smith, joins us to talk about Kalamazoo residents’ first chance to voice their thoughts on a compromise plan for a PCB laden dump site, one with a million and a half cubic yards of toxic waste.
  • Chef James Rigato, executive chef at The Root restaurant in White Lake Township and four-episode contestant on Top Chef, talks Michigan’s food scene.
  • Writer Bill Loomis discusses the stove, 19th Century Detroit’s “first mass-marketed, had-to-have durable good.”
  • Tom Deits, Project Director of Innovation 5, a new project at Impression 5 Science Center in Lansing, talks about his Next Idea: making Michigan’s museums more active and hands-on.
  • Bill Terrell, a Michigan State University criminologist and co-author of a new study on police attitudes, speaks about his research and whether or not officers need a college degree.
FLICKR USER AMERICANARTMUSEUM / FLICKR

Writer Bill Loomis calls the stove “America’s first mass-marketed, had-to-have durable good.” According to Loomis, 19th century Detroit was known as “the Stove Capitol of the World.” His story appeared in The Detroit News.

www.migop.org

Michigan's Republicans held their winter convention this weekend. Ronna Romney McDaniel was elected as the new Michigan GOP chair after former chair Bobby Schostak decided not to run for another term.

Ronna Romney McDaniel’s famous name is “a big selling point for her,” MLive’s Capitol reporter Jonathan Oosting said after speaking with McDaniel.

McDaniel’s uncle is Mitt Romney, former presidential candidate and Michigan native. Her mother, also named Ronna Romney, was a Republican National Committee woman in Michigan, and her grandfather is former governor George Romney.

taliesin / Morgue File

How does having a college degree affect an officer's view of police work, the community, and commanding officers?

William Terrill is a Michigan State University criminologist and co-author of a new study on police attitudes. His research, including a survey of more than 2,100 officers in seven mid-to-large-sized departments across the U.S., is being credited with starting to give us a more comprehensive view of the effects of higher education on policing.

Robin Deits

The Next Idea

The success of Michigan’s future economy will rely on more of our children engaging with science and technology. Their personal futures will depend on it too.

Executive Chef James Rigato at work at The Root
David Lewinski

In a few short years, executive chef James Rigato of The Root in White Lake has made huge waves in the Michigan culinary scene. In 2012, during its very first year of business, The Root won the prestigious "Restaurant of the Year" award from the Detroit Free Press. Since then, Rigato has continued to earn recognition for his work, winning local accolades and competing on the Food Network's show Top Chef.

Tim (Timothy) Pearce / Flickr

From attacks on Jews in Paris and Denmark, to controversy over Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s upcoming speech to the U.S. Congress, Israel is in the news.

Roey Gilad is the consul general of Israel to the Midwest. He represents the interests of the state of Israel in the Midwest.

  

Today on Stateside: 

  • A new Education Trust-Midwest report gives charter school authorizers low grades, but a gap in the state's charter school law may prevent them from being held accountable.
  • John U. Bacon discusses the Michigan State's and the University of Michigan’s chances for March Madness.
  • Freelance journalist, writer, and radio producer originally from Lucknow, India currently residing in Ann Arbor, Deepak Singh, talks about why innovation is not always the answer for The Next Idea.
  • Liangyu Fu, a Chinese studies librarian at the University of Michigan, tells us about Chinese New Year traditions.
  • Is there an Oscar curse? Strategy professor at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan says maybe.
  • Detroit business columnist Daniel Howes explains how Delphi Automotive has gone from bankruptcy to being a top-tier supplier, and the workers they’ve left behind.
  • Israeli Consul General to the Midwest Roey Gilad discusses U.S.-Isreal relations.
Quentin Kruger / Wikimedia Commons

It could have been a story of a company's ruin following a bankruptcy in 2005.

Instead, Delphi Automotive is "a Wall Street love story" -- but at what cost to its American workforce?

After U.S. bankruptcy, the automotive parts manufacturing company moved its headquarters from Troy to the U.K.

close up of an academy award statue
Flickr user Davidlohr Bueso / Flickr

The 87th Academy Awards happens Sunday.

Many would consider an Oscar win to be the pinnacle of success for an actor.

But what of the "Oscar curse?" Does winning that little gold man bring bad luck?

Strategy professor at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan Michael Jensen says maybe.

Tom Izzo talking to a referee
MGoBlog on Flickr / Flickr

Michigan State won against Michigan for the first time at Crisler Center since 2010. And with about three weeks until the NCAA unveils its tournament field of 68 for March Madness, the game had even more riding on it.

Innovation is not always the answer

Feb 19, 2015
Flickr/Paul Hamilton

The Next Idea

Innovation is a big word. 

I must confess I haven’t given it much thought in more than a decade, since I was in the last semester of my MBA program in India. Probably that’s because, back then, the word came up too often. Innovation this, innovation that. Innovate. Innovate. Innovate. 

Epic Fireworks / Flickr

Today is the first day of the Chinese New Year. There are celebrations happening worldwide, and here in Michigan to welcome the lunar New Year and bid farewell to the old.

The Chinese New Year is based off the lunar calendar.

Today on Stateside:

  • Michigan Public Radio Network’s Jake Neher joins us to discuss the package of gun bills moving through the State House and Senate. Read more about the bills here.
  • The Penobscot building’s iconic red light is partially burned out, so Todd Farnum is scaling the building to replace some of the bulbs and he joins us today to talk about it.

www.brookings.edu

Paying for college – it’s a challenge for many households.

Seventy percent of the college grads this year took out student loans, and the average college grad this year is paying back student loans of around $33,000.

While these numbers may seem daunting, advancements in technological and business models may help lower cost of college over time.

FLICKR USER SARRAZAK6881 / FLICKR

Coliform bacteria and boil-water alerts, rashes on kids, and water that tastes and smells horrible are some of the side effects associated with Flint’s decision to disconnect from the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department and switch to the Flint River while it transitions to a new system.

Conditions in Flint grew so terrible that environmental activist Erin Brockovich caught wind of the situation and turned her team’s attention towards Michigan.

The cause of this water crisis? Money.

TODD FARNUM

Since it opened in 1928, the Penobscot Building has been one of the architectural crown jewels of Detroit’s downtown. It was the eighth-tallest building in the world and the tallest in Michigan until the Renaissance Center hotel tower was built in 1977.

Generations of Michiganders knew that the top of this Art Deco tower was marked by a red neon light. But big sections of that light have burned out.

Todd Farnum, owner of Green Light Detroit, plans to climb the 47 story building to fix those lights.

Monks playing dungchen / Dechen Phodrang monastic school, Thimphu

A new study will create a digital sound map of religion in Midwestern cities by collecting sounds of worship – sounds like Gregorian chant, Muslim calls to prayer, and Native American chants.

The Religious Soundmap Project of the Global Midwest is led by Amy DeRogatis, an associate professor of religious studies at Michigan State University, and Isaac Weiner, an assistant professor of comparative studies at Ohio State University.

Flickr user Matt Taylor / Flickr

Albums, polka-dots and teddy bears aren't typically what you see as exterior house decor, but they've become a staple on Heidelberg St. in Detroit as part of the Heidelberg Project. The project is an outdoor community art environment created by Tyree Guyton.

It began when Guyton was a student at the College for Creative Studies in the 1980s. 

After a professor asked him what he wanted to achieve with his work, he had a vision.

"I was able to see using art as a medicine," said Guyton, "to take what was there and to transform it into something very whimsical."

Today on Stateside:

  • Representative Adam Zemke, Democratic Vice Chair of the House Education Committee and representative for Ann Arbor, discusses what he believes Michigan should focus on to improve early education.
  • Sandy Bakic of the New Martha Washington Bakery in Hamtramck talks to us about the Fat Tuesday tradition of paczki.
  • A new children’s book written by writer Michelle Balconi along with help from Reagan administration economist Arthur B. Laffer attempts to explain economics in a kid-friendly way.
Wikipedia Commons/Creative Commons

The White House begins its Summit on Countering Violent Extremism today.

The conference comes in the wake of deadly attacks carried out across the globe.

The shock waves over the murder of Lt. Muath al-Kasaesbeh were especially deep in southeast Michigan, where some of the pilot’s relatives live.

Courtesy of Joe Hertler

Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers are releasing their latest album, Terra Incognita, today. The eccentric six-piece band from Lansing and Kalamazoo often perform wearing fur coats and Hawaiian shirts, and front man Joe Hertler likes to sport rainbow angel wings or the state flag as a cape.

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