Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

FLICKR USER ABADLER / FLICKR

It's been a busy month in Lansing.

Detroit Free Press Lansing Bureau reporter Kathy Gray has compiled a list of the bills and resolutions introduced so far in March.

“There were 113 bills introduced, and if history repeats itself, about 40 of those will become law,” Gray said. “And, you know, there’s some pretty controversial bills that have been introduced and some pretty mundane ones too."

Take House Bill 4279, for example.

FLICKR USER ACTION BABY CARRIERS / FLICKR

Just about anywhere you see young parents, there’s a good chance you will see Action Baby Carriers. In place of pushing a baby in a stroller, these carriers let you “wear” your baby or toddler, and these carriers are made in Detroit.

“We made a carrier that you buckle to your body, so that you can be hands free and still have your baby nice and close to you,” said Andrea Govender, who owns Action Baby Carriers with her husband.

While in an Action Baby Carrier, the baby faces inwards, toward the person wearing him or her.

Sarah Hulett/Michigan Radio

The Next Idea

You’ve heard the impassioned arguments about public transportation in Michigan. Let’s start with the rational. Our roads are among the worst in the nation. Our lawmakers have clearly demonstrated that they are not up to the task of maintaining our aging infrastructure. Michigan, a state known for producing automobiles, has become a place where it is increasingly difficult to drive one.

Flickr user Julie Weatherbee / Flickr

There's a lot of attention and talk directed at start-ups about attracting new business to Michigan.

But writer Ilene Wolff pays tribute to some venerable long-time Michigan businesses. Her story, The Century Club: Michigan firms and businesses that have truly withstood the test of time, is in the current March/April print edition of DBusiness.

Flickr user Marion Doss / Flickr

One of the oldest structures in Detroit is being moved. The house, built in 1837, is the former home of Ulysses S. Grant.

Grant's residency in Detroit began when he was a young army officer when he was fresh out of West Point and transferred to the Detroit Barracks, according to Dan Austin of the Detroit Free Press and HistoricDetriot.org.

  Today on Stateside:

  • Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes discusses why Michigan’s reputation relies on honoring auto industry tax credits.
  • Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon recounts Jim Harbaugh’s beginning with Michigan Football.
Bentley Historical Library / University of Michigan

With so much buzz around Michigan football coach Jim Harbaugh, Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon thought he'd recount the coach's beginnings at the university.

Harbaugh's father was a defensive backs coach under the leadership of Michigan's legendary Bo Schembechler, and during this time Harbaugh was a ball boy for the team.

Flickr user Fernando Revilla / Flickr

Tomorrow, for the second consecutive month, will be a Friday the 13th.

Professor Phillips Stevens of the University of Buffalo, whose research includes topics such as cultural anthropology and religion, says this fear could have religious roots.

Chuck Anderson / Courtesy of The Oblivion Project

The Oblivion Project is dedicated to performing the music of Astor Piazzolla, the late Argentine composer who is regarded as a "godfather" of Tango Nuevo.

The group is appearing throughout the Midwest, including a performance at the Kerrytown Concert House in Ann Arbor on March 14, this coming Saturday night.

Cellist, band leader and Ann Arbor native Derek Snyder describes Tango Nuevo, saying, "It expands and goes in a lot more directions than traditional dance tango."

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Matthileo / Flickr

When Governor Rick Snyder was answering your questions earlier this week here on Michigan Radio, he waded into the issue of more than $9 billion in outstanding tax credits owed to businesses that stayed in Michigan and re-invested in their operations here. And that has tipped Michigan's budget into a deficit.

The program began in the Engler Administration but was widely used in the latter part of the Granholm Administration. Critics call it "corporate welfare," but Snyder disagreed with this terminology, saying the companies benefiting from this program helped create jobs.

Flickr

The Next Idea

For more than a century and a half, our education system has been designed around a model that prioritizes the standard delivery of instructional content and persistently focuses on what should be “covered."  This model may have served the needs of public education through the first half of the 20th century, but not today.

Today on Stateside:

  • Mlive.com reporter Jonathan Oosting joins us to talk about "Plan B," an alternate to the May ballot proposal to increase road funding.
  •  The co-author of a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Raymond DeVries discusses why it’s important for biobanks to explain where donations are going.
  • Detroit Institute of Arts Director Graham Beal talks about the DIA’s big exhibition opening Sunday: Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in Detroit.
  • Stateside’s Mercedes Mejia brings back an audio postcard from El Barzon, a restaurant in Detroit cooking in the spirit of Frida Kahlo.
  • Ironworker Richard Demara is with us to explain what it was like to help build the Mackinac Bridge, and what it’s like to look out from the bridge’s highest point.
  • Executive director of Women on 20s Susan Ades Stone talks about the motivation behind and goals of the campaign.
  • University of Michigan professor of psychology Ethan Kross and Michigan Radio's social media producer Kimberly Springer talk about the implications of using Facebook on our daily lives.
FLICKR USER URS SREINER / FLICKR

As much as we seem to love checking our Facebook feeds, the result may not be what you’d expect.

Ethan Kross from the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan recently published some of his findings involving Facebook in the Journal of Experimental Psychology.

Mercedes Mejia

While best known for her self-portraits portraying death and dark subjects, Frida Kahlo also had a love for life, and she loved to cook.

The Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in Detroit exhibit will open at The Detroit Institute of the Arts this month. In the same spirit, three Detroit-area chefs are paying tribute to the renowned Mexican artists. They’re guided by a book written by Guadalupe Rivera, Diego Rivera’s daughter, called Frida’s Fiestas: Recipes and Reminiscences of Life with Frida Kahlo.

FLICKR USER MOONFLOWERDRAGON / FLICKR

Do you know what's being done with the blood, plasma, tissue or any other samples you hand over to a biobank? Does knowing the intended use of donations help or hinder people’s willingness to donate?

 A new study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and conducted by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of Michigan, tried to address these questions.

FLICKR USER GEORGE THOMAS / FLICKR

The Mackinac Bridge is the longest suspension bridge in the Western Hemisphere, and the fifth-longest suspension bridge in the world. While crossing the Mackinac Bridge in itself is breathtaking, sometimes it’s hard not to wonder what it’s like way up there on top of the bridge's highest cables.

FLICKR USER CLOTEE PRIDGEN ALLOCHUKU / FLICKR

It looks like some lawmakers who aren't happy with the May ballot proposal to increase road funding are trying to come up with an alternative.

Flickr user ashleystreet / Flickr

This month, the Detroit Institute of Arts will unveil a major exhibition focusing on two of the most fascinating and influential artists of the 20th century.

chicago skyline from lake michigan with wake
Flickr user get directly down / Flickr

This year marks the 17th season of The Great Lakes Cruise Company, and three new cruises between Chicago and Montreal, along with a new ship, the Saint Laurent, will be introduced this year.

Joe Gratz / Flickr

The Michigan attorney general’s office has decided to withdraw subpoenas sent to reporters investigating prison conditions for teenaged inmates.The attorney general’s office asked for all notes and records dealing with interviews connected to a lawsuit alleging sexual assaults against teenaged state prison inmates.   

Today on Stateside:

  • General Counsel for the Michigan Press Association Robin Herman explains why the subpoenas served against the press yesterday were so surprising.
  • Ann Arbor filmmaker Toko Shiiki discusses her film Threshold: Whispers of Fukushima, and why some residents decided to stay in the community after the nuclear accident four years ago.
  • Owner of Source Booksellers in Detroit, Janet Jones, talks to us about why she believes independent bookstores are on the rise.
  • Hour Magazine chief wine and restaurant critic discusses screw cap wines.
  • Executive director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights, Matt Wesaw, tells us what Michigan is doing to foster better relationships between police officers and citizens.
  • This year marks the 17th season for the Great Lakes Cruise Company, and they’re adding new cruises this upcoming year to bring even more tourists to enjoy the region.
Source booksellers

With competition from Amazon and e-readers, big box bookstores have been hit hard. Borders closed in 2011 and Barnes & Noble has been forced to close hundreds of stores.

But independent bookstores are proving to have staying power.

Courtesy of Toko Shiiki

This week marks the four year anniversary of the magnitude nine earthquake that hit the coast of Japan and triggered a tsunami, leaving well over 15,000 people dead. The tsunami also caused the largest nuclear accident since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.

From a Ferguson protest in New York City.
user The All-Nite Images / Flickr

    

Peaceful protests continued through the weekend in Madison, Wisconsin, after an unarmed black teenager was killed by a white police officer Friday night.

It's the latest conflict between police and the communities they protect.

Today on Stateside:

FLICKR USER DAVID TRAWIN / FLICKR

On Election Day in 2008, Michigan voters said yes to medical marijuana. The vote came despite federal laws banning the sale and consumption of pot.

Since then, local ordinances and court rulings have created a patchwork of rules on the medical marijuana front. Following a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling, patients remain protected as consumers even though sellers no longer have a clear-cut legal protection to sell.

And since 2011, there’s been a drop in the number of patients receiving medical marijuana ID cards.

FLICKR USER RAYMORRIS1 / FLICKR

Studying archeology gives us a chance to open windows into the lives and beliefs of civilizations that have come before us.

We seem to have an endless fascination with Ancient Egypt. So it’s worth noting that we've got a chance to see Egyptian artifacts discovered in the 1920s and 1930s – objects the public has never had the chance to see before.

The University of Michigan’s Kelsey Museum of Archeology is putting on an exhibition, called Death Dogs: The Jackal Gods of Ancient Egypt.

FLICKR USER WYLIEPOON /FLICKR

“We all had white bellies and brown arms. We never took off our shirts because we never went to the beach anywhere, despite being residents of the Great Lakes state.”

That’s an excerpt from writer Jim Ray Daniels' collection of short stores set in Warren, Eight Mile High. The collection is on the Library of Michigan’s 2015 Notable Books List and is Daniels’ fifth collection of short stories, though he has also won many prizes and fellowships for his poetry.

Michigan must divide in order to conquer

Mar 9, 2015
Flickr

The Next Idea

When people think of Michigan, a number of iconic images come to mind – a long assembly line, acres of cherry orchards, miles of gorgeous coastline. This wide variety of industry, agriculture and tourism contributes to the resilience of our $400 billion economy and is what makes Michigan special. But these industries and regions also have very different requirements to help them grow. The challenge lies in how to foster growth in each one without competing against each other so that some Michigan residents win only when others lose.

Ryan Elder

One way to prevent accidents might come from redesigning road signs. 

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