Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Politics & Culture
4:55 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

It's October 1st. The beginning of the new state and new federal fiscal years have come in with a bang. The news making headlines across the country: the partial government shutdown. The first federal shutdown in 17 years.

Democrats and Republicans in Washington D.C. were unable to compromise on a continuing resolution to fund the federal government.

But, what does this mean for you here in Michigan?

Well, 41% of Michigan's budget comes from the federal government, but a shutdown doesn't mean all of that money will stop flowing immediately - though, it will slow.

Read more
Education
4:49 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Impacts of new school consolidation law felt in northern Michigan

An empty classroom.
Sarah Hulett Michigan Radio

A record number of Michigan schools are struggling to stay in the black.

So far, the headlines have focused on the fiscal problems of some of the state’s more populated counties.

A new state law allows state officials to dissolve and consolidate small schools with big problems.

Read more
Stateside
4:43 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Author revisits crime and corruption of yesteryear in 'Detroit Shuffle'

A map of Detroit from 1923, around the time author D.E. Johnson writes about in "Detroit Shuffle."
user davecito Flickr

Corruption. Political shenanigans. Murder. 

That may sound like life in a big city in 2013. 

But Kalamazoo-based writer D.E. Johnson says think again. His latest novel is set in the Detroit of 1912. From his research, there was plenty of crime and corruption happening in those good old days. 

Read more
Stateside
4:39 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

How deeply do major university donors influence higher education in America?

Real estate mogul Stephen Ross, left, donated $200 million to the University of Michigan in September.
Teresa Mathew The Michigan Daily

It was a gift — with a capital "G."

Real estate developer and Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross made big headlines last month with an eye-popping $200-million gift to the University of Michigan.

The donation is earmarked for the university's athletic department and the business school that already bears the name of Stephen Ross from an earlier gift of $113 million.

Read more
Stateside
4:24 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

When grandma is head of the household

Lynn Nww, clinical instructor and Kinship Care Education Center Coordinator at Michigan State University.
Michigan State University

It's called "Kinship Care."

It means relatives stepping in to raise a child, and it happens for many reasons.

Whether it's parents being deployed to combat in the Middle East, physical or mental illness, or incarceration, all over the country, grandparents or other relatives are being called on to raise a child. Today, more than 4.9 million children are living in grandparent-headed households.

Read more
Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Michigan's State Budget Director weighs in on the government shutdown

The Capitol building.
U.S. Congress congress.gov

Today, the federal government partially shut down, after Congress couldn’t reach a compromise on a budgetary resolution.

How is Michigan being hit by the partial shutdown in Washington?

To answer that question, we talked to State Budget Director John E. Nixon.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:11 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Major delays on day one of healthcare exchange

A woman receiving a shot.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

Michigan’s new online healthcare exchange went live today, meaning Michiganders would now have the opportunity to check out healthcare plans and subsidies available to them under the Affordable Care Act.

But the launch didn’t go without a couple of hiccups.

As the exchanges went live on the web, consumers encountered error messages, saying the high traffic to the exchanges would mean delays with actually looking at the plans.

Read more
Stateside
4:45 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

How will the partial government shut down affect Michigan?

The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, or "Super Committee," failed to come up with a compromise to reduce the deficit. Michigan members of the Super Committee spoke about the experience.
U.S. Congress congress.gov

We are just hours away from what appears likely to be a partial government shutdown.

The U.S. Senate, controlled by Democrats, and the Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives, have been unable to come to an agreement on a continuing resolution to fund the federal government.  If no agreement is reached today, which appears likely, the government begins shutting down at midnight.

David Shepardson, Washington D.C. based reporter for the Detroit News, joined us today from Washington.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:36 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Employers should be careful about what they see on social media

Flickr user rutty Flickr

Ever since the rise of Facebook we’ve heard the warning: be careful about what you put on Facebook, watch what you post online. What if a prospective employer checks out your Facebook page and sees something that tanks you for that new job?

But, in his recent article in Crain’s Detroit Business, writer Chris Gautz tells us it’s the employer who needs to tread lightly and carefully in looking at social media, or the online presence of potential hires, and he warns companies to be careful in taking action against employees for their Facebook or Twitter postings.

Chris Gautz joined us today to tell us more.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:31 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Livingston County is getting a pinball museum

Flickr user Needle Flickr

Clay Harrell has made saving pinball machines from the scrap heap his mission.

He has been collecting, repairing, and restoring pinball machines -- rescuing unwanted old machines and bringing them back to their former glory.

Now he’s moving his formidable pinball collection into a vacant VFW Hall in Green Oak Township in Livingston County. There he plans to create a private museum of pinball machines.

Clay Harrell joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:21 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Stateside for Monday, September 30th, 2013

Special Education students and their families in Michigan are about one month into the new school year and they're feeling the impact of the federal sequester cuts. Today, we looked at the cuts to special ed funding and find out what it means to schools and students.

 

And, a look at social media etiquette and your job--what's allowed and what's not.

And, one Detroit musician, and AP reporter, talks about his family's deep roots in Motown.

Also, we spoke with one man who has made it his mission to save pinball machines from the scrap yard. He plans to open up a private pinball museum.

First on the show, we are just hours away from what appears likely to be a partial government shutdown.

The U.S. Senate, controlled by Democrats and the Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives, have been unable to come to an agreement on a continuing resolution to fund the federal government.  If no agreement is reached today, which appears likely, the government begins shutting down at midnight.

David Shepardson, Washington D.C. based reporter for the Detroit News, joined us today from Washington.

Stateside
4:12 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Sequester cuts by Congress have hit special education students in Michigan

user BES Photos Flickr

The start of the new school year has brought unpleasant and unwelcome surprises for the parents of Michigan children with special needs.

That's because the federal sequester has hit special education, in the words of our next guest, "like a ton of bricks."

A new round of special ed cuts were forced by a 5% reduction in federal funding of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and now parents and special education students are seeing what that means.

With some 6.5 million disabled children from ages 3 to 21 getting services funded by the IDEA, this is something being felt across the country.

Marcie Lipsitt is the co-chair of the Michigan Alliance for Special Education. As the mother of a son with special needs, she has been a state and national advocate for disabled children. She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:38 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

AP reporter becomes a singer-songwriter-musician in his off hours

Jeff Karoub
Twitter

His name is Jeff Karoub. You've heard him here on Stateside in his role as an Associated Press reporter covering the Detroit area.

But today, we met a "different" Jeff Karoub. We met the singer-songwriter-musician who has just won a grant from the Knight Foundation for a project he calls "Coming Home To Music."

Jeff Karoub joined us in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
9:13 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Electronic musician inspired by family & place

"If I couldn't make music, I would not be a happy person."
Shigeto/Facebook

Michigan has a history of some pretty sweet music. One surprising genre that is Pure Michigan is techno. The art form was invented by three young men from Belleville in the 1980s (specifically Kevin Saunderson, Derrick May, and Juan Atkins, aka the Belleville 3, and you can listen to some classic Detroit techno here).

Read more
Stateside
4:44 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Federal judges send letter to Congress outlining problems with sequestration

Detroit Legal News

Many of us have not noticed the sequestration cuts by Congress, but they’re being felt within the federal court system. Eighty-seven judges have signed a letter outlining the problems caused by the cuts and they’ve sent it to Congress.

One of those judges is the Chief Judge for the United States District Court of the Eastern District of Michigan.

We spoke with him today about how the cuts are being felt. Listen to our conversation with him above.

Stateside
4:37 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Messing with the plans to merge Chrysler and Fiat

The U.S. government is no longer invested in Chrysler.
Ricardo Giaviti Flickr

Without a doubt, the automakers of Detroit are healthier, but in the midst of better cars and trucks and much better sales is some machinations with Chrysler.

When Fiat, led by Sergio Marchionne, allied itself with Chrysler, it seemed to solve problems for both companies. But Marchionne has a rocky relationship with Chrysler workers represented by the United Auto Workers.

Now, Chrysler’s retiree health care trust is offering $100 million worth of shares in filing for an initial public offering in the U.S. They want to take Chrysler public. That really messes with Marchionne’s plans to merge Chrysler and Fiat.

Detroit News columnist Daniel Howse wrote about that today and joined us today.

Stateside
4:35 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Feds coming to Detroit to help the city take advantage of grant dollars

Detroit.
Lester Graham Michigan Radio

White House officials are meeting with Detroit and Michigan officials tomorrow and the feds are expected to bring some money.

It’s not being called a Detroit bailout, but it is expected to include federal and private funds to help Detroit demolish abandoned buildings, support police and some transportation projects.

The Detroit Free Press has been reporting on efforts to leverage as much federal help as possible. Todd Spangler with the Freep joined us today.

One of the problems Detroit has had is getting grants -- not keeping within the requirements of the grant and having to send money back to Washington. Part of the meeting tomorrow at Wayne State University is to help Detroit handle the grant money better and to take advantage of other money that might be available to help- without crossing that line of being a bailout. 

Stateside
4:23 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

What's going on with Common Core?

Students in a classroom.
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

An interview with Michael Brickman, the national policy director at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a conservative education policy think tank.

You might have heard about the Common Core education standards and maybe a bit about the fuss over these new standards. We wanted to get a little more information about what’s going on.

We talked to Michael Brickman, the national policy director at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a conservative education policy think tank. 

Listen to the full interview above. 

Politics & Culture
4:22 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, September 26, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, September 26, 2013

After months and months of debate, the state House appears close to taking up the Common Core state standards for a vote.

Educational standards that have been approved by 45 other states.

On today's show: the facts - and myths surrounding Common Core.

And, then, Medicaid is being expanded in Michigan, but just who- what types of people - will be newly enrolled?

A new study has some surprising answers.

Listen to the whole show above!

Stateside
4:21 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Demographics of Medicaid enrollees change as coverage expands

A stethoscope.
Adrian Clark Flickr

An interview with Tammy Chang, the lead author of a University of Michigan Medical School study, examining the new faces of Medicaid.

As Medicaid expansion is coming, we’re starting to get a better picture of who will be covered. Much of Medicaid now is spent on people in nursing homes. But the expansion will include a lot of younger people, low-income workers.

A new study from the University of Michigan Medical School looks at the likely demographics and Tammy Chang, the lead author of that study, joined us in the studio to discuss the new faces of Medicaid. 

Listen to the interview above. 

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