Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

Flickr user Don Harrison / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

One of the most profound changes in Michigan has been the way we care for and treat people who are developmentally disabled.

In 1970, there were 14,000 people living in 13 institutions in Michigan. Today, there are no institutions in the state with the last one being closed in 2009.

This section of the Mitchell Map, circa 1755, shows the area that is now Michigan
flickr user FotoGuy / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Just what is the Lost Peninsula?

Don Faber tells us it’s a little strip of land in the very southeast corner of Michigan.

And here’s the kicker: The only way to access it is through Toledo.

Faber tells us that when Michigan and Ohio were still young states, they each performed a geographical survey to determine their boundaries.

Ohio’s survey placed Toledo in Ohio. Michigan’s placed it, well, in Michigan.

What followed was the Toledo War, a short conflict that ended in military stalemate.

 

Today on Stateside:

The Greek financial crisis could have implications for the world economy
user Duncal Hall / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

We’ve seen the images of people lined up at ATMs, hoping to withdraw a few euros.

Crowds sang and celebrated after voting against the terms of a bailout by international creditors.

The Greek financial meltdown has grabbed the attention of the world, and a pullout from the European Union could destabilize the world's financial markets.

House Bill 4183 wants to move public notices from the pages of your newspaper to the pages of your web browser
user Jon S / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Is it time to take public notices digital?

Those pages in our newspaper, with the government notices of election dates, upcoming public hearings, and legal descriptions of property to be sold or redeveloped are the focus of House Bill 4183.

It's a bill that could cost newspapers a long-time source of revenue, and it could shut out people who don't have Internet access.

Flickr user Liza Lagman Sperl / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Motor City Blight Busters are developing Veteran's Village Center, which provides housing for veterans and the opportunity to work with their organization.

The Center is currently under renovation. It’s located in Northwest Detroit near other properties owned by Blight Busters. 

She Writes Press

When describing the previous ten years of her life, writer Kelley Clink explains, “Being a sister to him made me who I was. Losing him has made me who I am.”

Her brother's suicide in 2004 sent her on a journey of guilt, of mourning, of realizing that her brother is gone. And the feeling that she may be to blame.

Clink turned this emotional journey into a new memoir, A Different Kind of Same.

Vet to media: We're not all broken

Jul 9, 2015
Courtesy of Jason Hale

The Next Idea

I am a veteran of two wars – one in Iraq, the other in Afghanistan.  Joining the military has been the best decision of my life.  But if you spend any time watching the news or scrolling through social media, you might wonder why I would say that. 


Today on Stateside:

  • People can be really bad at talking to veterans. We thank them for their service, but then what? As part of our series “Beyond the Battlefield,” we talk with a number of vets about those interactions, and find out how civilians can do better.
  • Since 2009, when a wrecking ball finally took down Tiger Stadium, volunteers calling themselves The Navin Field Grounds Crew has maintained the field. Now they fear that the field’s grass may be replaced with artificial turf.
Civil asset forfeiture grants state and federal agents the ability to seize any property they think could be connected to criminal activity.
user GPDII / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

People across Michigan have seen their cars, their TVs, their kids’ iPads, even their homes seized by police, often despite never having been charged with or convicted of a crime.

It’s called “civil asset forfeiture,” and it means that state or federal agents can seize your property if they so much as suspect that it has been involved in criminal activity.

The push against civil asset forfeiture is growing.

Flickr user istolethetv / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

As civilians it can be hard to know what to say or what to ask when you encounter veterans who have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan.

Often people will thank veterans for their service, but Erin Smith, a psychologist with the Veterans Administration Ann Arbor Healthcare system, says this can be a complicated statement for veterans to process.

Chris White

Mike Ellison says while he was born in Ethiopia, he was transformed in to an artist in Detroit. You can hear that fusion of cultures in his music. A lot of it combines traditional African music with modern hip hop. He uses his music and performances to raise awareness for causes both in Ethiopia and in Detroit.

Ellison spoke with Michigan Radio’s Emily Fox about how he uses his music as an education and community outreach tool. He gave his perspective on Africa and how it helped shape his identity, and also spoke about current racial issues in the U.S.


courtesy of Dave Mesrey

 

It was 2009 when the wrecking ball took down Tiger Stadium.

Since then, volunteers who love that historic site at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull have cut the grass and maintained the field. They call themselves The Navin Field Grounds Crew, a tribute to the ballpark's name a century ago.

Now they fear their beloved grass could be replaced by artificial turf.

As long as the rain keeps coming, we're going to see more mosquitos
flickr user trebol-a / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

All that rain we've had isn't just making our lawns and flowers grow.

Howard Russell is an entomologist with Michigan State University, and he says that the booming mosquito population is directly related to the rain.

Today on Stateside:

  • We cheer them as we welcome them home from Afghanistan or Iraq, but what's there for troops when it's time to change gears back to civilian life? Sherman Powell served in the Army from 1995 to 2006, and he sits down to talk with us about that transition.
Victor Li with a sample of his self-healing concrete
Victor Li

Michigan isn’t alone in the struggle to repair crumbling roads and bridges.

The American Society of Civil Engineers has given America's infrastructure a grade of "D" based on years of underfunding and delayed maintenance.

Victor Li may have the key to solving this nationwide struggle.

The University of Michigan civil and environmental engineering professor has invented self-healing concrete. It can bend, and if it cracks, it can repair itself.

Mark Zuckerberg speaks at the F8 keynote in 2008
flickr user Brian Solis / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

It’s been almost a decade since Facebook was opened to the general public.

Many initially saw it as a ripoff of then-powerhouse social networking platform MySpace, but since then it’s grown to take the top spot as ruler of the social media kingdom.

Some will argue, for better or for worse, that Facebook is now a permanent piece of our cultural landscape.

Marines on Flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Department of Defense reports 20,000 service members experienced at least one sexual assault in 2014. That's virtually unchanged since 2010, despite the Department of Defense's insistence that it has tackled the problem and that "most active-duty members received effective training on sexual assault."

U.S. Department of Agriculture on Flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

When veterans come home they are thanked for their service, but what is provided for them to make the transition from the military to civilian life?

From 1995 to 2006 Sherman Powell served in the Army, first as an infantry officer, then as a tank officer.  He was among the first veterans to return home from the Iraq War.

The craft beer industry in the U.S. is on the rise. According to the Brewers Association, craft beer sales in the states grew 17.6% in 2014, and the number of craft breweries in Michigan has increased 51% since 2011.

With so many people jumping into the game, how’s a beer supposed to stand out?

South Carolina legislature is debating whether to remove the Confederate flag outside the state capitol.
flickr user Ken Lund / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Ever since the killing of nine church-goers at a historic black church in Charleston, the demands to remove the Confederate flag from its position in front of South Carolina’s state capitol have only gotten louder.

Bill McGraw believes Southeast Michigan has its own version of the Confederate flag: the 10-foot-high statue of long-time Dearborn mayor Orville Hubbard. McGraw's recent opinion piece in Deadline Detroit looks at Hubbard’s legacy.

Today on Stateside:

The Supreme Court recently ruled that state legislatures aren't the only ones that can draw congressional district lines, and that decision has one lawmaker considering legislation to give that authority to an independent commission.

At least half of Michigan voters polled think the state isn’t doing enough to help its veterans. Peter Pratt joins us to discuss the survey results.

Michigan Photography

In an era when newspapers are struggling, the Michigan Daily has been going strong since 1890. 

The student-run newspaper at the University of Michigan has produced eight Pulitzer Prize winners and many others have gone on to make their mark in journalism and writing.

We must do more than say "thank you" for veterans in Michigan

Jul 6, 2015
Flickr/wiguardpics / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Next Idea             

I can’t recall a time when I was thanked for my military service and didn’t wonder just what exactly that person meant. Were they thankful that I took the defense of the nation in hand? Did they think that I stood watch on some specified border between insurgents and our coalition forces? Perhaps it was simply good American manners that they show appreciation for those who serve.

John M. Cropper / Flickr

A new poll from Michigan Radio and Public Sector Consultants asks voters in Michigan about their perception of veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The survey of 600 Michigan voters found that a strong majority support the military as an employment option, despite the fact that most do not have family currently serving in Iraq or Afghanistan.

DarkRoomIllusion / flickr http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Cuban Chamber of Commerce has chosen Troy, Michigan, as its third location and national headquarters.

Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Dana McAllister says the choice was a natural fit because of affinities between Detroit and Havana, a significant presence of Cuban-Americans in Michigan, and support from the Oakland County government and city of Troy.

Today on Stateside:

  • Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes takes a look at the booming popularity of paddling in Michigan.
     
  • It’s been four years since fireworks laws were loosened in Michigan, allowing the purchase of aerial fireworks. Jonathon Oosting tells us about what prompted that decision and what changes could be coming around the bend.
Morel mushrooms spring from the ground in Michigan.
State of Michigan

This next story is about a late-night call from a dealer and a sketchy interaction near the Leelanau Peninsula. 

Hour Detroit’s restaurant critic and wine writer Chris Cook tells us about an exhilarating experience he recently had that landed him with a stash of morels.

One night last month my wife and I ventured out from our rented Leelanau Peninsula cottage to a gathering spot where we heard the fried chicken reigns supreme.

Flickr user pontla / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Fourth of July weekend is at hand. In addition to reaching for a hot dog or a burger, more Michiganders are reaching for a paddle.

"There's a growing interest in all forms of it. From the old canoes on the rivers to sea kayaking to recreational boats down around Belle Isle to stand-up paddleboards," says Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes, who focused on this growing demand for his most recent column.

Courtesy of Phil Stagg

You’ve heard of storm chasers and tornado chasers.

Phil Stagg is a waterfall chaser.

He runs a business in Cadillac, but his real passion lies in taking photographs of Michigan.

He’s especially interested in the hundreds of waterfalls in the Upper Peninsula.

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