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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri). 

To find audio for the full show you can subscribe to our podcast or the full show here  

Wayne State University Press

She brought us the stories of Great Girls in Michigan History. Now, writer Patricia Majher is focusing on the boys.

Her new book is Bold Boys in Michigan History.

In it, Majher tells the stories of Michigan boys who did remarkable things before they were 20. These bold young men include a filmmaker, musicians, inventors, athletes, a politician, and more.

A corpse flower blooming
Courtesy of Meijer Gardens

It's a momentous week at the Frederik Meijer Gardens.

Its once-tiny corpse flower is now a strapping plant, reaching several feet high, and it's about to bloom for the very first time. 

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder.
Courtesy of Governor Snyder's office

Recent blogs from the free-market think tank the Mackinac Center for Public Policy applauded Governor Snyder's $10 million cut to what it calls "the state’s corporate and industrial handout complex." 

Tonya Schuitmaker
Senate PhotoWire

 

On August 25th, Republicans will meet for the 2018 state convention to nominate candidates. 

Among those vying for the nomination for Michigan Attorney General are Representative Tom Leonard, currently Speaker of the House, and state Senator Tonya Schuitmaker.

Group sitting on rug
Riverwise Website

Detroit-based quarterly magazine, Riverwise, focuses on activism and neighborhood concerns in Detroit and is now looking to find and train writers.

Managing editor Eric Campbell joined Stateside to talk about the magazine and the vision that brought it to life. 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Eric Sooy is showing me some of his percussion skills on a snare drum. He made that drum. Sooy is the president and founder of Black Swamp Percussion in Zeeland, Michigan. His company makes percussion instruments that have made it to symphony concert halls, rock and roll stages, and recording studios.

Grand Rapids
Steven Depolo / Flickr

Michigan members of Congress from both sides of the political aisle visited a refugee foster care facility in Grand Rapids today.

Democrats Debbie Dingell and Dan Kildee, along with Republican Bill Huizenga are urging the Trump administration to speed up the process of reuniting families separated at the southern border.

Joanne Savas in the studio holding a piece of a child's artwork
Lindsey Scullen / Michigan Radio

You don't need worldly goods or a big bank account to leave a priceless gift to your grandkids.

Joanna Savas of Ann Arbor wasn't able to leave large inheritances for her seven grandchildren, so she came up with something else: a book. 

people in voting booths
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

There is just over a month to go before Michigan’s primary elections on August 7th. 

WikiCommons

Poverty is an issue that dates back to ancient times. In the Christian gospel of John, Jesus says to his disciple Judas: “You will always have the poor among you.”

So what can society do about it?

An image of a silver bitcoin
Zach Copley / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

Cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin or the more than 1,500 other cryptocurrencies, are making some people rich. 

They're also opening up something new: your computer could be using its processor power, its memory, and your electricity to help make money for someone else. The process is called cryptojacking.

 

A group of Sae Jong Campers
Sae Jong Camp

 


Summer camp means many things to campers, outdoor fun or just a chance to get away from parents and siblings.

For kids who come to Sae Jong Camp on Higgins Lake, it is also chance to be with others who share their heritage.

Sae Jong Camp is the nation's oldest continuously running Korean-American overnight summer camp.

It's held each year at Camp Westminster in Roscommon drawing campers from all around the country. This year marks the 44th anniversary of Sae Jong Camp.

US Census Form
Heidi Ponagai / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today a U.S. House Committee is holding a hearing to get a progress report on the 2020 census. 

If the Trump administration gets its way, the next census will have something that hasn't been on a census in 70 years: a question about your citizenship status.

That has critics on high alert, fearing the question will keep non-citizens and even legal immigrants from responding to the census.

They say an inaccurate head-count is bad for their communities, and for Michigan.

Courtesy of Toni Trucks

Michigan born-and-raised actors may wind up working in New York or Hollywood, but they make sure the world knows they’re from the mitten.

Toni Trucks has been in a host of movies and TV shows, including her current roles as Lisa Davis in “SEAL Team” on CBS. Trucks began her performing career here in Manistee, and now she’s giving back to her hometown by loaning it her voice.

Courtesy of Michael Gustafson

On the first day that Michael Gustafson and his wife Hilary opened Literati Bookstore in the heart of downtown Ann Arbor, something possessed him to place a typewriter on a table for anyone to use.

That was in the spring of 2013. Since then, Gustafson’s “public typewriter experiment” has yielded a treasure trove of notes: some droll, some heartbreaking, some witty, some poignant.

Paula Reeves
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

Last week, a 17-year old student opened fire at Santa Fe High School. He left 10 dead and 10 more injured.

With every mass shooting in the United States comes a cry to address the issue of mental health. Lawmakers say we need to identify these troubled kids — and get them mental health resources before something terrible happens.

governor snyder at podium
Gov. Snyder signs Medicaid bill last month / Facebook

Last week, a federal judge blocked the State of Kentucky from the requiring low-income people to work in order to qualify for Medicaid.

In Michigan last month, Governor Snyder signed a similar bill. It requires all able-bodied Medicaid recipients work, or possibly lose their Medicaid benefits.

So how will the Kentucky decision impact the fate of Michigan's law?

Major Murphy
Daniel Topete / Facebook

This very hot summer week is a great time to find some new music to enjoy, preferably indoors and in front of an air conditioner.

John Sinkevics, editor and publisher of Local Spins, joined us once again for our monthly look at West Michigan's music scene. 

Marijuana plant
USFWS

 


This November, voters will decide whether Michigan joins the roster of states that have legalized recreational marijuana.

So what exactly will, and will not, be allowed if the Michigan Marijuana Legalization Initiative is approved?

Journalist Alexandra Schmidt has been tackling this question for Bridge Magazine. She spoke with Stateside’s Cynthia Canty to break down the ballot initiatives suggested changes. 

My Buy Canadian page Beth Mouratidis / Facebook

Canadians are unhappy. 

President Trump's tariffs on Canadian-made steel and aluminum exported to the US has fired up many Canadian leaders and consumers.

On Sunday, Canada slapped tariffs on $12.63 billion dollars worth of American-made goods in retaliation.  There's been a growing movement among Canadian consumers to boycott US-made products and services. Hashtags like #IShopCanada, #BuyCanadian, and #BoycottUSA are taking off across social media in Canada. 

Stateside 7.3.2018

Jul 4, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn about the longest-running Korean language and culture summer camp, which has taken place for 44 years in Roscommon, Michigan. Plus, if voters decide to legalize recreational marijuana this November, what will and won't be legal? 

Listen to individual conversations by clicking here or see below: 

smart phone open to facebook
Saulo Mohana / Unsplash

 


Amidst the public uproar over the separation of families at the U.S.-Mexico border, there was a notable push-back from leading airlines.

United, American, Southwest, and Frontier all announced they did not want the government using their planes to transport separated children, saying it defied their corporate values 

These airlines are just some of the corporations to openly resist the President, pointing to a trend of increased corporate activism. 

Michael Zadoorian
Doug Coombe


No matter your age or your generation, the music you listened to in high school claims a special place in your heart.

Many kids use music to help overcome the trials and tribulations of adolescence. 

Michael Zadoorian’s new novel Beautiful Music centers around one of those kids. He talked to Stateside about how the music of 1970s Detroit inspired the book. 

Solutions for Teachers / YouTube

Tracking a student's behavior is a big part of a teacher's job.

Two Michigan teachers developed a new app to make that job a little bit easier.

It's called TABS, Tracking Appropriate Behaviors System.

Along with tracking a student's behavior, it can also be used as a digital hall pass, and assist administrators, teachers, and students during a school lockdown.

a white scarf being thrown into a crowd of Elvis fans at Elvisfest
Courtesy of Mary Decker

It has been nearly 41 years since the passing of Elvis Presley, but "The King" can still draw a crowd.

Continuing Stateside's look at Michigan festivals, we headed to Ypsilanti for Michigan Elvisfest, taking place July 6 and 7 at Riverside Park. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder credits a stronger economy, as well as state and local reforms, for an absence of Michigan cities and school districts being run by state appointed emergency managers.

This is the first time since 2000 that there is not a single emergency manager running a Michigan city or school district. Highland Park schools were taken out from under state oversight last month. 

Bueno and other Luck Inc members
Courtesy of LUCK Inc.

 


Upon release from prison, ex-offenders often enter a world full of uncertainty. Where do you live? Where do you work? How do you survive? 

Mario Bueno tries to help people find these answers. He is the co-founder of Luck Inc., a non-profit headquartered in Detroit helping ex-offenders get on their feet. Bueno joined Stateside's Lester Graham to talk about how he started doing this work. 

Lake Victoria, Mwanza, Tanzania
Jonathan Stonehouse / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCL0

 


The North American Great Lakes region has some of the world’s leading experts on freshwater issues. A new nonprofit wants to share this expertise with researchers working with the Great Lakes across the Atlantic in Africa. 

Ted Lawrence is executive director of the African Center for Aquatic Research and Education. He joined Stateside to talk about the similiarities between the North American and African Great Lakes, and what they can learn from each other. 

painting of man on table with doctors above him
Mario Moore / Courtesy of David Klein Gallery


Is it possible for a black man to rest in an institutionally oppressive society? 

That is the question Mario Moore wants to tackle in his art. 

Moore is mixed-medium artist and a Detroit native. He sat down with Stateside to discuss his new exhibition “Recovering” which opens this weekend at the David Kline Gallery in downtown Detroit. 

Debbie Stabenow
stabenow.senate.gov

 


Yesterday, the United States Senate passed the farm bill, which establishes agricultural and food policy for the next five years. One key component within the bill is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), often referred to as food stamps. 

The Senate version of the farm bill differs substantially from the House version in regards to SNAP. 

Debbie Stabenow is a U.S. Senator for Michigan and the ranking member of the Senate Agriculture Committee. She spoke with Stateside’s Lester Graham about the differences between the House and Senate versions of this year's bill.

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