2013 Detroit mayor's race

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

 Write-in candidates claimed over half the vote in Detroit’s mayoral primary Tuesday.

And that means Mike Duggan’s write-in campaign has made Detroit history.

The former Detroit Medical Center CEO’s campaign was well-organized and well-funded. There was just one problem: a court challenge got him kicked off the ballot.

But apparently that wasn’t a big problem.

Though official results may take some time, Duggan appears to have defeated his next-closest rival, Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon, by 20 points.

People voting
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

It's not uncommon for voter turnout to be lower on primary Election Days than on the big general Election Days in November.

But so much is at stake in Detroit's primary today. Voters will narrow the field in races for Mayor and City Council.

They'll be choosing a district-based council for the first time in nearly 100 years. These leaders will be working closely with emergency manager Kevyn Orr during the city's historic bankruptcy, and they will be running the show after Orr leaves.

So the need for competent, passionate elected officials is greater than ever, and yet, turnout at the polls in Detroit is expected to be in the 15-17% range.

We wanted to talk about what's behind that chronically low number. Could it be something besides disaffected, uninvolved residents?

Nancy Derringer, a writer for Bridge Magazine, and Karen Dumas, the former chief of communications for Detroit Mayor Dave Bing and a communications/PR strategist, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Mike Duggan

There are 14 names on the ballot for Detroit mayor, but one of the widely-seen front-runners doesn't even have his name on it. That would be former Detroit Medical Center CEO Mike Duggan. Duggan is running a write-in campaign.

But, in the final weeks of the campaign, another man, a barber in Detroit, decided he too would run a write-in campaign for Mayor. His name is Mike Dugeon.

So, this is an election where spelling counts.

Rick Pluta, Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, joined us today to talk about these write-in candidates.

Listen to the full interview above.

Federal health data show that where you live may determine whether you will get cancer and what type.

On today’s show, we explored Michigan's cancer profile.

And, we traveled to the Headlands International Dark Sky Park near Mackinac City, one of only 10 designated sky parks in the entire world.

Also, we spoke with Rick Pluta about the write-in candidates in Detroit’s primary election.

First on the show, it's not uncommon for voter turnout to be lower on primary Election Days than on the big general Election Days in November, but so much is at stake in Detroit's primary today.

Voters will narrow the field in races for Mayor and City Council.

They'll be choosing a district-based council for the first time in nearly 100 years. These leaders will be working closely with emergency manager Kevyn Orr during the city's historic bankruptcy, and they will be running the show after Orr leaves.

So the need for competent, passionate elected officials is greater than ever, and yet, turnout at the polls in Detroit is expected to be in the 15-17% range.

We wanted to talk about what's behind that chronically low number. Could it be something besides disaffected, uninvolved residents?

Nancy Derringer, a writer for Bridge Magazine, and Karen Dumas, the former chief of communications for Detroit Mayor Dave Bing and a communications/PR strategist, joined us today.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Are you going to vote today? Statistics indicate that you likely will not.

The Michigan Secretary of State doesn't even list primary voter turnout statistics for non-presidential or non-gubernatorial election years.

But many of you did vote, and your votes will help determine our political future here in Michigan.

Below you can find links to the major primary election results around the state:

We'll post election results tonight as they come in.

A strong write-in campaign from Detroit Mayoral candidate Mike Duggan could complicate things in that race.

A high tally for "total write-in votes" in that race will mean we likely won't know results right away (the top two vote-getters will advance to the general election in November).

Are there other election results you're following? Let us know below.

People voting
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On Tuesday, polls across Michigan will open for statewide local elections.

Voters in 56 of Michigan’s 83 counties will cast ballots.
Given the city’s recent bankruptcy declaration, all eyes will likely be on Detroit’s mayoral race results.

But as Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody reported, counties across the states will face the usual suspects in the poll booths: school and library millages, ward elections, and filling city council seats.
How can you find out if there’s an election in your county? What’s on the ballot? And are you positive you're registered to vote?

User: Brother O'Mara / flickr

Legislators working to prevent animal abuse in Michigan

A bid to make Michigan the first state with an animal abuser registry has been dropped by lawmakers over concerns about cost and other issues. Instead, the state could soon require that criminal background checks be done on every would-be pet adopter at Michigan animal shelters. The $10 fee for each check could be waived for shelters. Cracking down on animal abuse has broad support, though some dog breeders question doing tens of thousands of background checks to flag a small number of abusers.

Michigan left turn could enter other states

The median U-turn is common on Michigan roadways; they allow drivers to avoid accident-generating left turns at intersections. But Wayne State University engineers say they aren't common in other states yet, in part because the design isn't included in standard manuals and software used by highway designers. The university received a $78,000 grant from Scientific Applications with which they plan to develop equations, text and software to include the Michigan left turn in the Highway Capacity Manual.

Looking forward to local primaries tomorrow

Local primaries will be taking place across Michigan tomorrow. The most interesting might be the Detroit mayoral primary. There are 14 names on the ballot, but the race is widely seen as a duel between former Detroit Medical Center CEO Mike Duggan, and Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon. But Duggan isn't even on the ballot, he's running a write-in campaign. Only the top two candidates will advance to the November general election.

Detroit elections officials are preparing for a long night after next week’s primary-- likely to be one of the more interesting primaries in Detroit history.

One of the front-running mayoral candidates, Mike Duggan, is only running as a write-in.

He faces another write-in candidate , Mike Dugeon, whose name is pronounced the same—and spelled virtually the same way.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Detroit has an emergency manager—but more than a dozen people are still vying to be the city’s next mayor.

And most of them were on hand for a debate just a week before the city’s primary election last night.

A dozen candidates took to the stage—in groups—to share why they wanted to be mayor of the bankrupt city. There were so many candidates that there few opportunities for substantive debate.

Former Detroit Medical Center CEO Mike Duggan is considered one of the frontrunners—even though he’s not on the ballot. He’s waging a write-in campaign.

Duggan faced questions about “cronyism” dating back to his days as part of former Wayne County Executive Ed McNamara’s political machine.

He also responded to persistent questions about why he’s running for mayor—when he’s lived in Detroit for barely a year.

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Matthileo / Flickr

This week in Michigan politics, Jack Lessenberry and Emily Fox discuss a Senate panel’s vote on a plan for Medicaid expansion, licensing delays for wolf hunting, and what to expect from Detroit’s mayoral election.

User: Brother O'Mara / flickr

Flint schools develop deficit plan

The Flint school district has a deficit elimination plan for the coming year.  School leaders approved the plan last night.  Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody reports that the plan calls for job cuts and the closure of two elementary schools.

Former U of M doctor to testify in insider trading case

A former University of Michigan neurologist could serve as a key witness in an insider trading case.  SAC Capital Advisors has been charged with wire fraud and securities fraud.  According to Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody, “one of the hedge fund portfolio managers indicted for securities fraud allegedly obtained information about a new Alzheimer’s drug from a University of Michigan neurologist in 2008.”  Dr. Sidney Gilman advised the company that the experimental drug was not going to be successful.

New candidate enters Detroit mayoral race

Mike Dugeon, a barber from Detroit, has announced his intent to run for mayor.  The hopeful write-in candidate announced his plan to run yesterday.  Alana Holland reports “Whoever is behind the campaign for the new entry Dugeon could potentially hurt Duggan's chances in the Aug. 6 primary.”

Mike Dugeon's Facebook Page / Facebook

A new candidate has announced his candidacy as a write-in for the Detroit mayoral race.

His name? Mike Dugeon.   

Yes, that's a direct aim at a certain other write-in candidate, Mike Duggan. 

Mike Duggan, former Detroit Medical Center CEO, has been gaining quite a bit of support for his write-in campaign for the office. But instead of just filling in the circle next to his name, voters will have to do a couple extra things in the ballot box:

Write in the name, fill in the circle, and make sure there are two Gs.

http://dugganfordetroit.com

DETROIT (AP) - A Wayne County judge has cleared the way for ex-health care executive Mike Duggan to be a write-in candidate for Detroit mayor.

Judge Lita Popke on Monday dismissed a lawsuit filed by mayoral candidate Tom Barrow and others. Popke earlier knocked Duggan off the Aug. 6 primary ballot after a challenge by Barrow because Duggan hadn't lived in Detroit long enough before filing to run.

Popke said Duggan meets all requirements to run as a write-in candidate. The state's election director last week also said Duggan met all City Charter requirements for a write-in campaign.

Duggan and Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon have been seen as leading candidates for mayor. Duggan would need to finish at least second in the primary to appear on the Nov. 5 general election ballot.

Write-in candidates are usually considered long shots for winning political office.

But it’s possible this upcoming Detroit election could turn conventional wisdom on its head.

Former Detroit Medical Center CEO Mike Duggan is running a write-in campaign for Detroit mayor.

The Lansing-based newsletter Inside Michigan Politics recently commissioned a poll asking Detroit voters whether they’d write in a candidate for mayor.

For the last year, former Detroit Medical System czar and long-time Wayne County political fixer Mike Duggan has been gearing up to run for mayor of Detroit.

The 55-year-old candidate was seen by many movers and shakers, both black and white, as perhaps the one politician who could actually run the city, once it emerges from control by Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr.

But Duggan’s candidacy was derailed when a circuit judge ruled him off the August primary ballot because of an odd technicality.

User: Brother O'Mara / Flickr

“Right-to-read” suit continues

A Wayne County judge is allowing a suit against the Highland Park school district to proceed.  “The suite says the district failed to comply with a state law that requires remedial assistance for students not reading at grade level in the fourth and seventh grades,” reports Michigan Radio’s Lindsay Hall.  The “right-to-read” suit was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union last year.

Duggan supporters consider write-in campaign

Mike Duggan will announce his next steps today in the Detroit Mayoral race.  Michigan Radio’s Sara Cwiek reports that Duggan’s supporters are preparing a write-in campaign for him.  Duggan was ousted from the race last week when courts decided he was ineligible after filing his paperwork outside of the approved dates.    

Detroit City Council President ousted

Detroit City Council President Charles Pugh has been relieved of duty.  Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr stripped him of his salary and authority after he failed to turn up for a final deadline Wednesday evening.  Michigan Radio's Julia Field reports that Pugh is also under scrutiny after allegations surfaced of an inappropriate relationship with a high school student.

Will Mike Duggan launch a write-in campaign for Detroit mayor?

Some of his supporters want him to do just that.

Two courts decided that Duggan couldn’t run for mayor because of a technical residency requirement in the city charter.

Duggan decided not to appeal the issue to the Michigan Supreme Court. And when he announced that last week, Duggan said he wasn’t interested in running a write-in campaign, either.

But some of his supporters, like Peggy Noble, didn’t want to let Duggan’s mayoral campaign die.

Mike Duggan

Mike Duggan has dropped out of the race for Detroit mayor, a day after the Michigan Court of Appeals removed him from the ballot.

A stocky white guy from Livonia, Duggan moved his family to Detroit last year so he  could run.

But now, he'll likely be remembered as the guy who couldn't wait just two weeks.

Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

At a press conference early this morning, Mike Duggan announced he is officially withdrawing from Detroit’s mayoral race.

Duggan, the former CEO of the Detroit Medical Center, was kicked off the mayoral ballot last week after the Third Circuit Court ruled that he did not meet the residency requirement in Detroit’s electoral law. The Michigan Court of Appeals upheld that decision. Duggan declined to appeal that ruling.

Matthileo / Flickr

This week in Michigan politics, Jack Lessenberry and Emily Fox discuss the state of Medicaid expansion in the Michigan Senate, Governor Snyder's trade mission to Israel, and the political future of Mike Duggan in Detroit.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

  Mike Duggan says he’s confident he’ll be back as an official candidate for Detroit mayor.

Duggan is appealing a judge’s decision that disqualified him from the ballot Tuesday.

The issue: The Detroit city charter says anyone running for office must be a registered Detroit voter “for one year at the time of filing for office.”

According to a Wayne County judge’s ruling, that means the day you submit petitions to run—and in that case, Duggan doesn’t make the cut.

User: Brother O'Mara / Flickr

Farm Bill moves to U.S. House

The Michigan Farm Bureau is glad to see Congress is making progress on passing Senator Debbie Stabenow's farm bill. The U.S. Senate approved nearly a trillion dollars in support for food assistance, crop insurance and other programs this week.  Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody reports, "the U.S. House is still wrestling with its version of the bill."

Tea Party activists will sit out of governor's race

An open letter to Governor Rick Snyder released by a group of prominent Tea Party activists calls on their party to sit out next year's race for governor. They call for Snyder to change his position on Medicaid expansion. Tea Party group "Grassroots in Michigan" says Snyder is bucking the Republican platform by cooperating with the new federal healthcare law.

Duggan is out of the Detroit Mayoral race

A Wayne County judge has kicked Mike Duggan off of the ballot for Detroit Mayor. When Duggan filed for a mayoral run a month before the deadline, he didn't meet a city rule that requires candidates to be registered voters in Detroit a full year before filing.  But he did meet the rule by the filing deadline date.  Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports, "Duggan says he's reviewing his legal options."

dugganfordetroit.com

Detroit mayoral candidate Mike Duggan has survived an opponent’s attempt to get him kicked off the ballot—for now.

The challenge from opponent Tom Barrow cited language in the new Detroit city charter—and questioned whether Duggan met residency criteria to run for mayor.

Duggan moved to Detroit from suburban Livonia and registered to vote in mid-April, 2012.

User: Brother O'Mara / Flickr

Controversy of Medicaid reform is being debated

A bill is being debated in the Michigan house to reform Medicaid in the state.

"The federal government is offering to pay for an expansion of Medicaid that would add hundreds of thousands of Michiganders to the program. But Republican leaders in the state Legislature say they're not willing to expand the system without major changes." Michigan Radio's Jake Neher reports.

Michigan projected to get $542 million more than expected

The state of Michigan is projected to get nearly half a billion dollars more than expected in revenue.

"The state’s economic measurements remain mixed. Michigan still has one of the nation’s highest jobless rates. But Governor Snyder says improving revenue is evidence of confidence in the state’s economy," Michigan Radio's Rick Pluta reports.

The governor has suggested using the surplus to draw down federal transportation dollars, or cover a Medicaid shortfall.

Changes are imminent in Detroit

As of yesterday, Mayor Dave Bing will not be running for re-election, James Craig has been appointed Detroit Chief of Police, and more than half the incumbents on the Detroit City Council will not be seeking another term. The general elections will be held on November 5th. The Detroit News has more.

Detroit Mayor Dave Bing.
Kate Davidson / Michigan Radio

Detroit Mayor Dave Bing announced this afternoon that he will not run for re-election. 

But before he made the announcement, he spent nearly 20 minutes outlining his previous successes. 

He concluded his speech with the mention of exploring "other options, including the office of Wayne County Exec."

Michigan Radio's Cynthia Canty spoke with Nancy Kaffer, an editorial writer for the Detroit Free Press.

To hear Kaffer's thoughts, click the link above.

User: Brother O'Mara / Flickr

Buena Vista could hold summer camps for students

There could be a solution for the students in Saginaw County’s Buena Vista district to finish out the school year.  A plan to use federal funds to run voluntary “skills camps” that focus on reading, math, and writing will be presented this evening to the local school board.

"The Buena Vista superintendent says it’s a creative solution that would allow students to finish out the school year," Michigan Radio's Rick Pluta reports.

Man with pressure cooker arrested at Detroit Metro Airport

On Saturday Hussain al Khawahir was taken into custody at the Detroit Metro Airport. He tried to enter the US from Saudi Arabia with an altered passport, and lied to security officers about why he was carrying a pressure cooker. Al Khawahir will have a bond hearing this afternoon, reports Michigan Radio's Kate Wells.

Detroit Mayor to make announcement about future

Detroit Mayor Dave Bing has scheduled an announcement for today at noon. Bing's spokesman Bob Warfield said that Bing would "make a major announcement about his political future." Today is the deadline to file for a second 4-year term as mayor, the Associated Press reports.

I was mildly startled last week to learn that Detroit Mayor Dave Bing had picked up petitions he’ll need if he files to run as a candidate for another four-year term as mayor. 

Now this doesn’t mean he is going to run. He has to decide, one way or another, by May 14, two weeks from today.

For months, I had assumed the mayor was not going to run. He’s had a battered and bruising four years. Thanks to Detroit’s crazy system, he had to win four elections in nine months four years ago.

via dugganfordetroit.com

The Detroit mayor’s race has been unofficially underway for months.

But former Detroit Medical Center CEO Mike Duggan was the first to file the paperwork to get his name on the August primary ballot Tuesday.

Candidates need at least 500 petition signatures to get on the ballot.

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