WUOMFM

app

Feliciano Paredes grew up in a family of migrant farm workers.
Courtesy of Feliciano Paredes

The Next Idea I grew up in a family of migrant farm workers. Every spring, Dad would take the truck to the mechanic to make sure it was in good condition to make that 2,000-mile trip across the country to pick crops. I’d let my friends know when we were leaving, and when they could expect to see me again in the fall. I remember waking up to Mom yelling at us from downstairs to get up and get ready to go. We’d scramble out of bed, make sure we all went to the bathroom, and sit down for breakfast before heading out just before dawn. No matter how prepared we were, we faced many challenges as we went from state to state. We’d break down on the road, and because we weren’t familiar with what resources were available, we would end up spending a few nights in the truck until Dad could find help. It was common to arrive at farms only to find out that we didn’t have work, or that the labor camp was full. Basic health care and educational resources were also scarce. The transient nature of our work, our language and income, and the insecurity of not knowing the local area worked against us.

Wikimedia user Brian Ammon / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Next Idea When looking at the modern world of innovation or business, you really can’t ignore China. The country’s influence is huge, but interacting with Chinese companies, educators or officials can present a tough challenge for native English speakers: Mandarin Chinese is so fundamentally different from English, especially in tonal inflections. Catherine Ryu is a Michigan State University researcher who is working with a team of students to develop a new game that could help English speakers learn Mandarin.

Sportsman Tracker / Facebook

The app Sportsman Tracker was developed in Grand Rapids by Jeff Courter, the company's CEO. " A lot of times you just want to know what’s going on in your area," he says. "If it’s fishing, you want to know what’s biting, what’s going on, what are people catching around you.”

More than half a million people voted absentee in this week's primary election
Lars Plougmann

Millennials are the largest generation in America, making up an entire third of the population. They’re also the least likely to vote. A report from Tufts University says that less than 20% of people age 18 to 29 voted in the 2014 election. Andrew Koehlinger wants to do something about that. He’s the project director for VoteSpotter , an app that seeks to get younger voters engaged in the politics.

Overdrive Interactive

Senior technology writer for Slate , Will Oremus, has a hard time “getting” Snapchat. He says the app makes him feel old, and recently wrote an article about his struggle. Oremus is 32 years old. Snapchat is one of the fastest-growing social apps in the world. So this raises the question: Are newer apps trying to keep older users out of the loop? Kimberly Springer, Michigan Radio’s social media producer, doesn’t think so.

First on Stateside, Gov. Rick Snyder joined us from the Mackinac Policy Conference, followed by Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes. The prevalence of social media has changed a lot in our world, and in the wake of graduation season social media may affect job prospects for applicants. Having social media profiles that are professional may be the key to landing a job. University of Michigan researchers have developed a new app for smartphones that can detect mood swings in bipolar patients via voice analysis, so that patients can get the help they need. In the midst of all of the recalls, General Motors is approaching its five-year anniversary of declaring bankruptcy. *Listen to the full episode above.

uofmhealth.org

The National Institute of Mental Health tells us that some 5.7 million American adults struggle with bipolar disorder. A critical part of managing the disorder is the ability to sense when the mood swings are about to happen – something the patient isn't aware of – and get that patient to a physician straight away for help. A research team at the University of Michigan is working on a smartphone program called PRIORI. It detects mood swings through voice analysis of phone conversations, while still protecting the patient's privacy. Dr. Melvin McInnis is one of the researchers. He's a psychiatrist and a bipolar specialist, and he joined us on Stateside. *Listen to the full interview above.

The excitement of a dream vacation in a faraway land can lose its luster if you get there and find yourself fogged-in by jet lag. Certainly, if a big business meeting is the purpose of your trip, you want to land and be as mentally "on your game" as possible. Now, thanks to University of Michigan researchers, there's an app for that. It's called Entrain , and it crunches the numbers to help you minimize that jet lag. Daniel Forger, professor of mathematics and computational medicine, joined us to talk about the app. Listen to the full interview above.