Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture
5:26 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Detroit music legend Derrick May says bankruptcy is just a new angle to an old story

May at the 'Free Your Mind' festival in 2009.
Rene Passet Flickr

There was another plot turn in the long story of Detroit's struggles yesterday.

A federal bankruptcy judge looked at all the evidence and declared, yep, the city of Detroit is indeed insolvent.

It's new, for sure, but for many who have lived and worked in Detroit, it's just more of the same.

Derrick May is one the founding fathers of techno music. Detroit was the birthplace of the genre, and May has achieved a lot of success traveling around the world playing shows. (Listen to his breakout hit here.)

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Arts & Culture
1:07 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

3 things to know about Christie's preliminary report on the DIA

user aMichiganMom Flickr

According to the Detroit News, Christie's Appraisals estimated the market value of the DIA's city bought works at somewhere between $452 and $866 million.

Christie's released the preliminary report today. The full report will be shown to Detroit's Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr the week of December 16.

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Stateside
3:39 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Meet indie-folk group The Accidentals

Katie Larson and Savannah Buist
Facebook

Popular music has had stellar examples of singer/songwriters who met in school...whose partnership began at a very young age.

John Lennon and Paul McCartney met when John was 16 and Paul was just 15. Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel met in grade school. They were 12 years old and had their first hit record, "Hey Schoolgirl," when they were just 16 years old.

Now we want you to meet a Michigan duo who are getting a lot of buzz for their indie-folk songs, The Accidentals.

The Accidentals are Katie Larson and Savannah Buist, who met at the Interlochen Arts Academy. They are 18 years old, and they joined us today from Traverse City.

Listen to the full interview above.

That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Nowadays you can parse all kinds of things

Parsing used to be restricted to sentences, but now we can parse all kinds of things.

This week on That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan talk about the verbs to parse and to vet.

Parsing originally came from the Latin noun pars, meaning “parts”  as in “parts of speech.” When parse appeared in the English language in the 16th century, it referred to analyzing a sentence syntactically by breaking the phrase down to its parts of speech.

However, by the 18th century, parse came to mean “examining something closely by breaking it into component parts,” or even “to understand.” Now, parse has yet another definition to computer programmers, meaning “examining strings.”

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Stateside
2:07 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Learning more about the Amish in Michigan

user shirl wikimedia commons

When you think of "The Amish" what comes to mind?

Horses? Buggies? Long dresses and bonnets? Long beards? No electricity?

Well, yes, there is all of that. But there is so much more to the Amish in America, and here in Michigan, where the Amish population numbers around 11,000.

We wanted to find out more about the Amish -- especially what the rest of us might learn from them.

Consider this: how does a one-room Amish schoolhouse - going only to eighth grade, with only a battery-powered clock in the way of "technology" - how do these schools turn out highly successful entrepreneurs whose firms gross annual sales in the million-dollar range?

I'm joined by Gertrude Enders Huntington joined us today. She’s a retired professor from the University of Michigan. She is the co-author of "Amish Children: Education in the Family, School, and Community.”

*Listen to the audio above.

Stateside
4:42 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

How co-workers view 'personal expressions' of their colleagues at work

Nearly half of the Detroit workforce lack the basic skills needed by employers
sideshowmom Morgue File

Ask anyone here at Michigan Radio who walks by my cubicle: I love my husband, kids and grandson. I love the countryside in County Cork Ireland, and I love Roger Daltrey of The Who.

Why do they know that?

Because all around my desk, I've tacked up photos of my family, of the fields of West Cork, and of my meeting with the legendary Who singer.

It's something I've always done at my desks throughout my career.

But an intriguing study by University of Michigan researchers suggests I might not be doing myself a favor with such "visible expressions" of my personal life.

Joining me is one of the five co-authors of the research paper, set for publication in the Journal of Organizational Behavior.

Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks is an Associate Professor of Management and Organizations at the Ross School of Business at UofM.

Newsmaker Interview
4:40 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

StoryCorps celebrates its 10th anniversary

Screenshot.
Storycorps website.

StoryCorps is celebrating its 10th anniversary of bringing us conversations that move us, make us laugh, make us think...and of course, draw some tears. 

Today, we talk with the founder of StoryCorps, David Isay about their new book "Ties that Bind: Stories of Love and Gratitude from the First Ten Years of StoryCorps”.

Stateside
4:37 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Ann Arbor school finds a creative way to teach kids music

The Detroit Symphony musicians and the DSO management have agreed to meet
Zuu Mumu Entertainment Flickr

All too often, as school districts are forced to cut spending, programs like music get the ax.

And that sorry fact robs students of the chance to learn music, to make music, and leaves one to wonder: Where are the musicians of the future going to come from?

One Ann Arbor Elementary School is teaming up with the University of Michigan School of Music for a unique approach to teaching music...and they are turning to Venezuela for inspiration.

It's called El Sistema.

The program originated in Venezuela, and the idea was to teach disadvantaged children, to help them discoverer the power of music.

I spoke with Professor John Ellis with the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre and Dance, where among other things, he is Director of Community and Preparatory Programs - and Horacio Contreras Espionoza, he is a UofM grad student studying cello, and he is an El Sistema teacher at Mitchell Elementary School in Ann Arbor.

Stateside
4:31 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

The Jewish contribution to American cooking

Part of the cover of the More than Matzo Balls cookbook by the 2010 National Council of Jewish Women, St. Louis Section.
Courtesy of the University of Michigan Library

 

There's an exhibit going on now  through December 8 at the Hatcher Graduate Library at the University of Michigan. It's entitled "American Foodways: The Jewish Contribution."

Janice Bluestein Longone is the co-curator of the university's new exhibit.

She has spent more than four decades creating a 25,000-item library of American culinary literature -- one of the largest, most acclaimed private collections in the world.

But, Jan says she was surprised by the outpouring of support she received from the Jewish community.

Stateside
4:12 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Heidelberg fires in Detroit energize Tyree Guyton to make more art

Emily Fox Michigan Radio

An open air art installation in Detroit has become the subject of a suspected arson rampage.

It's had 6 suspicious fires in 7 months.

The fires have demolished several homes that are key to the art project, but the artist behind the project says he’s energized by the wreckage and is ready to begin another stage of his art project.

The Heidelberg Project is on the east side of Detroit and takes over two city blocks.

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Stateside
3:36 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

An interview with Ann Arbor electro-pop music duo Hollow & Akimbo

Hollow & Akimbo
Bruno Postigo Facebook

An interview with with music duo Hollow & Akimbo.

That’s “Hollow and Akimbo” on their new EP “Pseudoscience” on Quite Scientific Records.

Their electro-pop is winning this Ann Arbor duo some very warm praise from critics, including some in the UK.

Hollow & Akimbo duo Jon Visger and Brian Konicek joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
12:40 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Pere Marquette 1225 back on the rails after four years

Maiden run of refurbished Pere Marquette 1225
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

The historic steam locomotive that inspired the movie, "Polar Express" is back on the rails after four years of renovations.

The effort took a lot of steel, four thousand bolts, a million dollars, and countless volunteer labor hours.

The massive Pere Marquette 1225 in Owosso is one of a few remaining operable steam engines of its size.

Aarne Frobom is President of the Board of Directors for the Steam Railroading Institute. He says the train is a living history lesson.

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That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Because language change

“Because language change.” Is this a sentence? 

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan discuss the changing use of because and slash.

On Tuesday, an article  in The Atlantic by Megan Garber brought attention to a new usage of because. Because can now be followed by a noun, adjective or gerund like in the phrase, “Because Internet.”  

“Because is traditionally a subordinating conjunction, so it requires a clause after it, as in, ‘I’m late because I was watching videos on YouTube,’” Curzan describes. “Or it can be a compound preposition, like, ‘I’m late because of the traffic.’”  

Today, thanks to the evolution of language on the Internet, people are writing and saying phrases like: “I’m late because YouTube,” “I’m not going out because tired,” or “I’m late because running.”

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Stateside
4:38 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

The Michigan Opera Theatre is a gem in Detroit

David DiChiera is the founder of the Michigan Opera Theatre.
michiganopera.org

Detroit sure has seen its share of challenges in the past

4o years, but all through that time the city has been home to one of the most vibrant regional opera companies in the nation: The Michigan Opera Theatre.

The founder of the MOT is Dr. David DiChiera.

He’s recently been named the 2013 Kresge Eminent Artist. That prize is the Kresge Foundation’s annual lifetime achievement award in the Arts.

It’s been called the most prestigious local prize in the field of culture. David, We welcomed David to the program today.

*Listen to the audio above.

Culture
5:04 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Buddhism's growing place in our culture

Donald Lopez, author of a new Buddhist reference book.
Myra Klarman

There is no questioning the data: Buddhism is a force to be reckoned with. Estimates of the number of practicing Buddhists around the world ranges from 350-million all the way up to 1.6 billion.

 Buddhism is also recognized as one of the fastest-growing religions in the world. A University of Michigan professor has spent the past 12 years putting together what's being hailed as the most authoritative and comprehensive reference on Buddhism ever produced in English. It is "The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism," co-authored by Robert Buswell of UCLA, and Donald Lopez. He is the Chair of the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures and he is a Distinguished Professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies at the University of Michigan.

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Stateside
5:00 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

People will share their failures on a Detroit stage this Thursday

The background for FAILURE:LAB.
FAILURE:LAB FAILURE:LAB

Bill Gates once declared, “It's fine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.”

Of course, we all fail at times. But many of us try to cover those mistakes up, or at the very least, choose not to broadcast our failures.

One Michigan group is looking to change that — not only talking about our shortcomings and errors, but sharing them on a stage. FAILURE:LAB brings together storytellers, talking about when they’ve failed, and gives the audience a chance to reflect on the stories told. Because according to the folks at FAILURE:LAB, failure can help inspire us to take intelligent risks.

FAILURE:LAB is coming to Detroit this Thursday. We talked to Austin Dean, co-founder of the group, about what FAILURE:LAB is, and what it can do for audience members and storytellers alike. 

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:54 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Students say learning an instrument drives their success

Do piano lessons lead to a more successful career outside of music?
user MIKI Yoshihito Flickr

A recent essay in The New York Times poses an intriguing question: Is music the key to success?

A striking list of notables from many different fields have one thing in common: they all played some sort of musical instrument. Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, who played clarinet and saxophone, Microsoft co-founder and guitarist Paul Allen, and Condoleeza Rice, who trained to be a concert pianist before becoming our 66th Secretary of State all have linked their music training to their professional accomplishments.

We wanted to take a closer look at the impact playing music can have on the way we learn and how we work.

We talked to Siobhan Cronin, a Masters student at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance. Cronin, who studied economics, French and music as an undergrad, is now working on her next degree in violin and viola performance.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:59 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

The Michigan Women's Hall of Fame has some new inductees

Elizabeth “Bessie” Eaglesfield
The Greater Grand Rapids Women's History Council

The Michigan Women's Hall of Fame has just announced its latest list of inductees. Among them are six contemporary women and three women from Michigan's past.

We took a closer look at one of those women from the past. Elizabeth Eaglesfield broke ground as one of the first female lawyers in Michigan history, but she didn't stop there. 

Just wait till you hear more about her remarkable life and career.

Joining us was Jo Ellyn Clarey of the Greater Grand Rapids Women's History Council, who nominated Elizabeth Eaglesfield.

Listen to the full interview above.

Social issues
7:30 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Non-profit: 19 housing units available for every single homeless person in Kent County

Ashton stayed as Well House earlier this year. VandenBerg says he eventually re-united with the mother of his child and moved in with them.
Lisa Beth Anderson

A non-profit group in Grand Rapids is re-energizing its effort to get people who are homeless into permanent homes.

Well House has been around since the late 1970s. About a year ago, the non-profit emergency homeless shelter Well House was in danger of closing. That’s when its new executive director Tami VandenBerg pushed the group to switch gears and provide permanent homes instead.

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That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun November 17, 2013

The correct use of myriad and plethora

Most people agree that a myriad is a lot, but there’s less agreement about how to use myriad correctly.

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan examine three words that mean a lotmyriad, plethora and ton.

When choosing between myriad possibilities and a myriad of possibilities, which phrase is correct?

Myriad of is older than myriad with the noun,” Curzan explains. “Myriad comes into English in the 16th century when the word originally means 10,000, a specific number.” The word changed from referring to 10,000 of something, to meaning a countless number of something.

When myriad first appeared in English, it was always plural and followed by of, such as many myriads of men. Then, in 1609, the singular form of myriad was first used, followed again by of. This allowed for phrases like a myriad of bubbles. Finally, in the 18th century, the noun was first dropped from the phrase. At that time, the saying myriad beauties was then considered correct.

Today, both phrases are used. Although myriad of is a bit more common than myriad followed by a noun, either expression can be used.

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