Arts & Culture

Stateside
4:24 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Michigan filmmaker's new film explores bullying from the point of view of the bully

NCWD/youth

As social media has embedded itself into our lives, so too has the national conversation about bullying.

Facebook, Twitter and other forms of social media have given bullies boundless opportunities to torture their victims. What used to be something that happened in school halls and classrooms now finds its way into every corner of the lives of our young people.

One of the voices that has joined this conversation about bullying is that of a Michigan filmmaker. Her newest film, shot in Oakland County, is called "The Bully Chronicles."

It brings us the story of teen bullying through the eyes of the bully, and she recently turned to the Huffington Post, where she wrote to the teens accused of bullying a 12-year-old Florida girl to the point where she committed suicide by jumping off a tower.

Her post was headlined "From One Bully To Another: An Open Letter to Rebecca Sedwick's Bullies."

Amy Weber joined us in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
7:00 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Fire strikes Detroit's famous Heidelberg Project, again

At The Heidelberg Project
user: doug_coombe Instagram

Update:

The Heidelberg Project's Executive Director Jenenne Whitfield told the Detroit Free Press that security cameras and extra lighting will be added to the project.

Fire has destroyed another home that’s part of the Heidelberg Project, a world-famous Detroit public art installation.

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Stateside
5:33 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Grand Army of the Republic building in Detroit has a new lease on life

historicdetroit.org

It was one of the more memorable vacant buildings in downtown Detroit, but its days of being vacant and decaying are, happily, in the past.

The historic Grand Army of the Republic Hall at Cass and Grand River is getting a new lease on life thanks to brothers Tom and David Carleton and their partner Sean Emery.

They bought the little castle-like building in 2011 from the City of Detroit for $220,000 and started cleaning and restoring it at once.

Now this architectural gem will be home to the partners’ media production firm Mindfield.

It stands as an example of an historic building being saved, not by a tycoon with very deep pockets, but some small business owners with a vision.

One of those partners, Tom Carleton, joined us today.

*Listen to the interview above.

Arts & Culture
1:48 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Check out these award-winning Instagram pictures from Detroit's Brush Park

A photo from Diane Weiss' Instagram account, Brushpark_MyHood.
Instagram

A Detroit Free Press photo editor won a $3,000 grant for her latest project — capturing her community through her iPhone lens.

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Arts & Culture
1:14 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Another fire destroys a house in Detroit's Heidelberg Project

The "House of Soul" was covered in vinyl records.
Heidelberg Project Facebook

This Tweet came from The Heidelberg Project this morning:

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Arts & Culture
12:20 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

GVSU students will get their 'Wrecking Ball' back... for science, not for riding

This is not a bifilar pendulum, but at least no one is riding it.
user: sylvar Flickr

Grand Valley State University plans to reinstall a campus sculpture by December 6. 

The sculpture was removed on September 17 because students began to ride it.

The 'riding-the-ball' trend was in response to Miley Cyrus's hit single "Wrecking Ball." In the video, Cyrus is naked and rides the wrecking ball as it swings back and forth.

Apparently, the Grand Valley ball was not up to the task. The University said the steel cable that the ball was hung from began to fray, and the sculpture was removed.

Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith spoke with Tim Thimmesch, the associate vice president for facility services at GVSU. After the sculpture was removed Thimmesch said they would meet with "select students this week to get input on the best options to reinstall the piece."

“The intent is not for anybody to continue to use this as a ride. Again the intent will be to have this reinstalled as a scientific exhibit,” Thimmesch said.

And that's what we really want to know more about, right? The science behind this ball?

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Culture
11:59 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Veterans Day celebrated in Flint this morning

Retired Master Sergeant Tom Salvador salutes the flag during a Veterans Day ceremony at Flint city hall
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

It's Veterans Day, and all across Michigan, small ceremonies are taking place honoring the nation's military veterans.

A light rain fell in Flint as a small ceremony was held at 11 a.m.

Veterans Day has it's roots in the Armistice that ended World War I. Under the terms of the armistice, that war ended at "The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month."

Vietnam era veteran Raul Garcia told the small group assembled in front of Flint city hall of his pride of being part of a military family.

"To me, it's just a great pride to wear this uniform knowing that we are the greatest nation around," Garcia said. 

There are more than 650,000 military veterans in Michigan.

That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Are you following new norms of electronic conversations?

Texting has changed the conventions of punctuation, and given the period entirely new emotional clout.

Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan discuss the evolution of written conversation on this week’s edition of That’s What They Say.

Curzan and her students have been investigating how electronic conversations work. Those via text or email. One significant change they found is the "power period," which creates the difference between okay (without a period) and okay (with a period).

“Without a period, that’s the neutral or unmarked okay,” Curzan explains. “The okay with a period is a little bit abrupt, a little bit more serious and maybe even a little bit angry.”

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Arts & Culture
4:41 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

East Lansing's Broad Art Museum marks first year

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) - More than 114,000 people visited the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum in East Lansing in its first year.

The Lansing State Journal reports that the museum recently held a celebration to thank donors, leaders of Michigan State University, where the museum is located, and staff members.

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Stateside
4:43 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

DuMouchelles art gallery and auction house

Stock photo.
kellinahandbasket Flickr

Let’s say you’ve been watching episodes of “Antiques Roadshow,” and now you’re inspired. So you want to find out what that old painting you bought at a garage sale for $5 bucks is really worth.

There’s a place in Detroit where you can do just that and get feedback from experts who are regulars on the TV show. Of course, if you’re in the mood to buy things, you’re also in luck.

Michigan Radio’s Kyle Norris tells us about DuMouchelles, an auction house in Detroit.  

Stateside
4:39 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

The band Art in America returns after 30 years

Art in America the band back in the 1980's.

Imagine this - a Detroit rock band from the 1980's disappears from the music scene, until a producer in England rediscovers them and helps them put out a new album.

Well, that’s what happened to our next guests. They call themselves Art in America. The band name for three siblings from Michigan, Chris, Dan and Shishonee Flynn. After nearly 30 years they are out with a new album called The Hentschel Sessions.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:58 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

New film about Michigan beer to premiere at the Fillmore Theatre

There's an intriguing movie premiere happening Thursday night at the Fillmore Theatre on Woodward in downtown Detroit.

"The Michigan Beer Film" will be screened along with samples of some of the Michigan brews featured in the film.

We're always happy to talk about Michigan beer here on Stateside, so we welcomed the producer and director of "The Michigan Beer Film", Kevin Romeo. He joined us today from Kalamazoo. 

Listen to the full interview about.

Stateside
3:15 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Michigan musician tells the story of his battle with leukemia

Stewart Francke
Twitter

An interview with musician Stewart Francke.

Whenever you talk about the key players in Michigan's music scene, one of the names that inevitably comes up is that of Stewart Francke.

Born in Saginaw, he's made his home, raised his family and built his music career in Metro Detroit.

Writer and critic Jim McFarlin calls Stewart Francke "Detroit's workingman's troubadour," a title he's earned and maintained over decades of making his music.

But today we are going to hear about another journey Stewart Francke has been on, a journey into the world of cancer. A journey that began when he was diagnosed with leukemia that forced Stew and his family and circle of friends to join together to wage a ferocious battle.

He's now telling the story of his cancer battle in his e-book from Untreed Reads. The title says it all, "What Don't Kill Me Just Makes Me Strong."

Stewart Francke joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:31 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

How yoga studios can impact the cultural landscape of a city

Practicing the warrior pose.
Tomas Sobek Flickr

Back in the 1990s, we began to see coffee shops pop up in cities all around Michigan — Starbucks, Caribou, Biggby.

Now, a similar trend is happening with yoga studios, here in Michigan and nationwide.

As the Washington Post’s Lyndsey Layton put it:

“To track the economic transformation of Washington, here's a simple rule: Follow the yoga mats.”

How do yoga studios change the cultural landscape of a city? Are these changes positive or are long-time residents being kept away from the table?

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Stateside
4:30 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Royal Oak's Pete Wurdock has a new collection of short stories

Royal Oak writer Pete Wurdock has just published his fourth book. It's a collection of short stories, all of them set in Northern Michigan.

 The collection is entitled "Bending Water and Stories Nearby" and it's as interesting to hear what it took for Pete to get this stories written as it is to actually read these 14 stories. Pete Wurdock joined us in the studio. *Listen to the audio above. 

Stateside
4:52 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Canadian photographer finds art in Detroit's decaying buildings

A photo from Jarmin's Detroit exhibit.
Philip Jarmin Facebook

Anyone who has spent time driving around the city of Detroit has seen ruined buildings. They can be found just about everywhere within the city limits.

Among those decaying buildings can be found some of the finest examples of early 20th century architecture, the kinds of buildings that remind us that Detroit was once known as the “Paris of the Midwest.”

Canadian photographer Philip Jarmain first discovered these disintegrating beauties while he was a student at the University of Windsor. And ever since 2010, Philip Jarmain has been documenting these vanishing early 20th century buildings.

Twenty of his fine art prints were recently on exhibit at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco, with interest in these large format architectural photographs certainly fueled by the headlines surrounding Detroit’s bankruptcy filing.

The exhibit was called American Beauty: The Opulent Pre-Depression Architecture of Detroit.

Philip Jarmain joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Icky words and why people hate them

There is one word that lots of people hate—moist. What makes this an icky word?

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan talk about icky words and why we dislike them.

It’s difficult to pinpoint why people detest the term moistMoist-haters often claim the problem is the way the word sounds, yet they don’t have the same reaction to similar sounding words like foist. The sexual connotation of moist probably adds to the discomfort the term creates.

In the spring of 2012, the New Yorker’s Culture Desk blog ran a contest that allowed participants to vote for a word to drop from the English language. As expected, about 1 in 10 people voted to throw out moist.

Read more
Arts & Culture
4:31 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Want history, architecture and beheadings? Try Detroit's haunted bike tour

Outside Wheelhouse Detroit.
Mercedes Meija Michigan Radio

Wheelhouse Detroit, a bike shop right next to the Renaissance Center, puts on all sorts of guided bike tours through the city — tours of churches, urban agriculture, and painted murals. But for those looking for something, well, a little more creepy, the shop also offers a haunted bike tour that takes brave riders through cemeteries, ghostly spots, and long-gone homes with a murderous past.

The ride takes you to the cozy, produce-filled confines of Eastern Market down to St. Aubin Street, which, as the tour guides will tell you, was once a hot spot for the Purple Gang, a gang of bootleggers and hijackers who ran booze from Canada to Detroit. The gang, which got its start when Michigan banned alcohol in 1917, remained active up until the early 1930s.

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Stateside
3:09 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

New MSU exhibit presents hundreds of Alan Lomax Michigan folksongs

Alan Lomax
Wikipedia

 Famed folklorist Alan Lomax prowled through Michigan on his legendary 10 year cross-country trip, collecting American folk music for the Library of Congress. In that collection is a lively reel by a fiddler named Patrick Bonner recorded on Beaver Island, Michigan in 1938.

Now, Alan Lomax’s hundreds of Michigan recordings are being presented in a traveling exhibition from Michigan State University. It’s called Michigan Folksong Legacy: Grand Discoveries from the Great Depression.

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Stateside
10:15 am
Thu October 31, 2013

The history of Halloween in Michigan

Flickr user Terry.Tyson Flickr

 You drive around most neighborhoods these days and there is absolutely no doubt we love Halloween.

Once upon a time, you carved a pumpkin, popped in a candle and put it on your porch to greet trick or treaters.

Now, homes are decked out with giant webs and big spiders, ghouls and witches, and don't forget the lights. Halloween is now second only to Christmas for consumer spending.

Just when and where did this all begin? And how far back does Halloween go here in Michigan?

We turn to historian and contributor to the Detroit News Bill Loomis for the answers. 

Listen to the full interview above.

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