Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Mixtape Detroit: Nolan the Ninja, Bonny Doon, and Karriem Riggins

Jan 16, 2018



2017 is in the books, and Detroit Music Magazine has put together the annual "best of" lists.


Guiding us through some highlights are Paul Young, founder and publisher of Detroit Music Magazine, and executive editor, Khalid Bhatti.

Stateside 1.15.2018

Jan 15, 2018

Oprah talked about rape survivor Recy Taylor at the Golden Globes. Today on Stateside, we talk to the Michigan historian who's been researching and telling Taylor's story for the last 15 years. Also today, MSU's Broad Museum spotlights two important Michigan artists.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Eat Pomegranate Photography / Courtesy of the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum



Two iconic Michigan artists are in the spotlight, thanks to an important exhibition at the Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University.


The works of Jim Shaw and the late Mike Kelley are being displayed in an exhibition at the MSU Broad called "Michigan Stories: Mike Kelley and Jim Shaw." It is running through February 25th.


Danielle McGuire

It was an electrifying moment at last week's Golden Globes when Oprah Winfrey put the spotlight on a black woman from Alabama named Recy Taylor. In 1944, as she was coming home from church, Recy Taylor was kidnapped and raped by six white men. They left her blindfolded by the side of the road and threatened to kill her if she told anyone what had happened. She did anyway. Nevertheless, justice was never served.

English doesn't use very many infixes, but that doesn't mean they don't exist. 

Here's the thing: they're out there, but most of them aren't fit for print or our airwaves. We'll come back to that. 

Wondering what exactly an infix is? Here's a hint -- they're related to a pair of other grammatical elements that may a bit more familiar. 

smcgee / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The Fifth Annual North American Conference on Video Game Music is coming to Ann Arbor. As you’ll hear in the interview above, music has come a long way since Tetris or Mario Brothers.

Today, games such as Halo and Destiny include hours of lush arrangements.

Courtesy of Hajjar Baban

Hajjar Baban is the 2017 Detroit Youth Poet Laureate. She was also a finalist in the 2017 National Youth Poet Laureate Program.

Baban joined Stateside today to talk about her process, and to read her poem, “portrait of my grand / father as another kurdish man i never met.”

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Outside of Grand Ledge, at the end of a long driveway tucked away among the trees, we found a house and a large steel barn, the workshop of our latest featured artisan, Allen Deming of Mackinaw Watercraft.

He’s been building monocoque strip built boats as a full-time pursuit for ten years. Monocoque strip built is basically a single hull canoe or a kayak or other vessel made from strips of wood glued together and then sealed with fiberglass and epoxy.

Stateside 1.11.2018

Jan 11, 2018

Today on Stateside, we meet a world champion ice carver. For her, spending hours in the freezer is just another day at the office. And, a psychiatrist explains why we should not be in the business of diagnosing the president. 

Brandie Ekpiken

President Trump and his supporters say they want to "make America great again," but just what that means and what part of America's past they refer to as "the greatest" is unclear.

Given our nation's turbulent history when it comes to the treatment of people of color and women, there are some who feel that slogan is not meant to include them.

Courtesy of Ice Dreams Sculptures

For most of us, working in subzero temperatures doesn’t sound like the dream job. But the cold doesn't seem to bother World Championship ice carver Tajana Raukar.

Raukar is the owner of Ice Dreams Sculptures in Plymouth. It's cold in her studio, and she's wearing full on winter gear. 

Stateside 1.10.2018

Jan 10, 2018

Today on Stateside, the state says there's enough money to keep the Children's Health Insurance Plan running until summer. And, in the midst of uncertainty, a science advisor to the Michigan PFAS Action Response Team says the new cleanup standard for PFAS chemicals errs on the "side of caution." Also today, country-rock and jazz artist Jill Jack reflects on two decades of making music in Michigan.

Michael Hacala

Fans of singer-songwriter Jill Jack know she's been a mainstay of Detroit’s music scene for over two decades.

Back in October, she released her 12th full length album These Days, a nod to the Jackson Browne tune.

At the 2017 Detroit Music Awards, Jack was recognized for Outstanding Americana Artist/Group, Outstanding Americana Vocalist and Outstanding Jazz Recording for "Pure Imagination."

Stateside 1.9.2018

Jan 9, 2018

Today on Stateside, a law professor says Attorney General Bill Schuette has failed consumers. Schuette strongly disagrees. And, we discuss the game-changing effect of being able to see mental illness.

Eyewear Publishing, 2017

Cal Freeman’s newest collection of poems, Fight Songs, has nothing to do with ‘The Victors’ or ‘Victory for MSU.’ Instead, his poems are about unsung, little-noticed lives, about underdogs, about animals, plants, and nature.


It’s game day in Denver.

Before the Broncos start playing football, players are announced as they sprint onto the field through a smoke-filled tunnel shaped like three wild, galloping horses.


This pregame ritual is only a couple minutes long, but for an NFL team, it’s a really big moment. 

“It is on a national stage a lot of times,” says Liz Coates, Game Entertainment Manager for the Broncos.

“It’s what TV uses when they’re rolling out … highlights,” she says. “A lot of that footage gets used.”


Theater Talk is back for the New Year.

David Kiley of Encore Michigan joined Stateside today to bring the latest look at productions from professional theater companies around the state.

As the New Year begins, he also shares his thoughts on the state of professional theater in Michigan, including what he says is its biggest challenge: awareness.

Stateside 1.8.2018

Jan 8, 2018

Today on Stateside: Will a rare indoor velodrome become Detroit's newest Olympic breeding ground? And, "mediocrity will perpetuate mediocrity," so how do the Red Wings break free? Also today, a trans opera singer discusses his risky decision to follow his dreams. 

On this week's edition of That's What They Say, English Professor Anne Curzan joined us from Salt Lake City, Utah where she attended the American Dialect Society's annual meeting. 

Each year, the ADS gathers to choose a word that best represents "the public discourse and preoccupations of the past year."

Before we reveal the word that dominated 2017, we feel it's necessary to assure you that there's nothing false about this report.

Central Station in Detroit
Gordon / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

Thirty years ago this week, on January 5, 1988, the last train left Michigan Central Station. That moment marked the end of nearly 75 years of Michiganders catching trains at the once-proud station.

Dan Austin, who has written three books about Detroit history and founded HistoricDetroit.org, and Mark Harvey, state archivist from the Michigan History Center, joined Stateside to discuss the station's legacy.

Rob White / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

In this era of texting and tweeting, we’re at risk of losing some of the marvelous words that add texture and meaning to conversation and writing.

A good place to begin to up our collective language game is by checking out the newest list from the Wayne State University Word Warriors. The group dug around in the linguistic cellar to recover neglected words that deserve a place in 2018.

Yes, 2018 has arrived! Time to look back at some highlights from West Michigan’s music scene in 2017 as well as looking forward to some artists generating attention as the new year unfolds.

Top West Michigan musicians of 2017

It wouldn’t be a stretch to say this was a banner year musically for the west side of the state, which already had produced stars like BØRNS, a native of Grand Haven who continues to electrify the pop scene from his new home in Los Angeles.

Stateside 1.2.2018

Jan 2, 2018

2018 feels like a monumental year in politics. Today on Stateside, we discuss which way Michigan voters will swing. Also today, a psychologist explains why we're so easily fooled by fake stories online. And, we hit the streets to capture some of our fellow Michiganders' hopes and dreams for the new year.

Author Doug Stanton
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

The last American troops left Vietnam on March 29, 1973.

America's direct intervention in the Vietnam War was at an end, after many bloody years, and 58,220 American lives lost.

Afterward, the nation, and those Vietnam veterans, had a tough time processing and talking about this war that did not end with victory.

Mixtape: Colin Stetson, Stef Chura, and Royce da 5’9”

Dec 19, 2017
Courtesy of artists

Today on Stateside, we take an end-of-the-year listen to music from Detroit-area artists. Our guides, as always, are Paul Young, publisher of Detroit Music Magazine, and Khalid Bhatti, the magazine's executive editor. 

Listen to the full conversation above, or read highlights below.

Colin Stetson, “All This I Do for Glory” from All This I Do for Glory

Today on Stateside, an economist explains why "the average family doesn't really get a whole lot" from the $1.46 trillion tax overhaul. And, the mastermind behind Jumanji gives his take on the updated film version. We also learn why it's not hard for foster kids to just disappear, and what a Traverse City author is doing to try to change that. Finally, we learn why it's important to recruit black, male teachers.

If you're someone who likes to mull things over, consider this question our holiday gift to you.

When you mull something over, must "over" always be part of the equation? Or can you leave it out and simply mull something?

Take a second to mull that over.

Courtesy of Emma Weinstein

On Sunday, there will be a staged reading of a new play called Come My Beloved. It's described as being about race, intimacy, and Detroit.

The play chronicles a Friday night in the lives of three black and Jewish couples at different points in time.

The playwright and director is Emma Weinstein, and she joined Stateside today.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

You don’t have to have a password, or pull a secret lever, or push a button for entry, but the Sidebar in Grand Rapids definitely has that speakeasy feel. The address is available: 80 Ottawa Avenue NW, but finding it is a little tricky. Hint: go down the steps toward the pizza place.

Wystan / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

104 years ago this month, some 400 miners and their families were at a Christmas Eve celebration in Calumet in the Upper Peninsula. 73 men, women and children would not live to see Christmas Day.

We know this tragedy as the Italian Hall Disaster and the 1913 Massacre, born out of the depths of a long and bitter miners' strike.