Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Emily Fox / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s summer resort towns like Traverse City, Mackinac and Petoskey live and die by the summer tourist season. Things slow way down in the winter. The streets are a lot quieter, the traffic is gone and many businesses close up shop. But for artists who live in the resort town of Harbor Spring year round, the boom and bust cycle of the seasons is a blessing in disguise.


Rosa Parks is widely known as a civil rights icon. Many of us can pull up that image of her sitting on a bus gazing out the window, her eyes fixed on something just beyond our sight.

A new book, Our Auntie Rosa: The Family of Rosa Parks Remembers Her Life and Lessons, shares stories that help us understand the woman beyond the historical figure. It was written by her niece, Sheila McCauley Keys, with Eddie B. Allen, Jr.

FLICKR USER AMERICANARTMUSEUM / FLICKR

Writer Bill Loomis calls the stove “America’s first mass-marketed, had-to-have durable good.” According to Loomis, 19th century Detroit was known as “the Stove Capitol of the World.” His story appeared in The Detroit News.

Executive Chef James Rigato at work at The Root
David Lewinski

In a few short years, executive chef James Rigato of The Root in White Lake has made huge waves in the Michigan culinary scene. In 2012, during its very first year of business, The Root won the prestigious "Restaurant of the Year" award from the Detroit Free Press. Since then, Rigato has continued to earn recognition for his work, winning local accolades and competing on the Food Network's show Top Chef.

Croswell Opera House

A theater in Adrian is putting on a production geared for kids with autism.

"The Cat in the Hat" at the Croswell Opera House will try to minimize loud noises or bright lights.

We’d like to stress that That’s What They Say is a safe place for word enthusiasts to confide language pet peeves without fear of ridicule or judgment. 

When host Rina Miller worried her frustration with people who say “gantlet” instead of “gauntlet” made her a Miss Snooty Pants, we assured her, she’s not. 

In fact, when it comes to “gauntlet” vs. “gantlet,” Miller isn’t alone.

 

Submitted by Carla Milarch

A new professional theater is opening in Ann Arbor that will only put on new plays, with a special focus on building up Michigan playwrights.

Theatre Nova is renting performance space in an old renovated barn on a shoe string budget, says artistic director Carla Milarch.

“We did a little mini fund drive in like the last three weeks of December and were able to raise about $20,000."

close up of an academy award statue
Flickr user Davidlohr Bueso / Flickr

The 87th Academy Awards happens Sunday.

Many would consider an Oscar win to be the pinnacle of success for an actor.

But what of the "Oscar curse?" Does winning that little gold man bring bad luck?

Strategy professor at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan Michael Jensen says maybe.

Epic Fireworks / Flickr

Today is the first day of the Chinese New Year. There are celebrations happening worldwide, and here in Michigan to welcome the lunar New Year and bid farewell to the old.

The Chinese New Year is based off the lunar calendar.

Today on Stateside:

  • Michigan Public Radio Network’s Jake Neher joins us to discuss the package of gun bills moving through the State House and Senate. Read more about the bills here.
  • The Penobscot building’s iconic red light is partially burned out, so Todd Farnum is scaling the building to replace some of the bulbs and he joins us today to talk about it.

TODD FARNUM

Since it opened in 1928, the Penobscot Building has been one of the architectural crown jewels of Detroit’s downtown. It was the eighth-tallest building in the world and the tallest in Michigan until the Renaissance Center hotel tower was built in 1977.

Generations of Michiganders knew that the top of this Art Deco tower was marked by a red neon light. But big sections of that light have burned out.

Todd Farnum, owner of Green Light Detroit, plans to climb the 47 story building to fix those lights.

Monks playing dungchen / Dechen Phodrang monastic school, Thimphu

A new study will create a digital sound map of religion in Midwestern cities by collecting sounds of worship – sounds like Gregorian chant, Muslim calls to prayer, and Native American chants.

The Religious Soundmap Project of the Global Midwest is led by Amy DeRogatis, an associate professor of religious studies at Michigan State University, and Isaac Weiner, an assistant professor of comparative studies at Ohio State University.

Flickr user Matt Taylor / Flickr

Albums, polka-dots and teddy bears aren't typically what you see as exterior house decor, but they've become a staple on Heidelberg St. in Detroit as part of the Heidelberg Project. The project is an outdoor community art environment created by Tyree Guyton.

It began when Guyton was a student at the College for Creative Studies in the 1980s. 

After a professor asked him what he wanted to achieve with his work, he had a vision.

"I was able to see using art as a medicine," said Guyton, "to take what was there and to transform it into something very whimsical."

Courtesy of Joe Hertler

Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers are releasing their latest album, Terra Incognita, today. The eccentric six-piece band from Lansing and Kalamazoo often perform wearing fur coats and Hawaiian shirts, and front man Joe Hertler likes to sport rainbow angel wings or the state flag as a cape.

shelf of wine bottles
Flickr user Geoffrey Fairchild / Flickr

Can you refrigerate red wine? Or should you? Chief wine and restaurant critic for Hour Detroit Magazine Chris Cook says maybe.

According to Cook, both white and red should be ideally kept at a temperature between 40 and 55 degrees, or the typical temperature found in wine cellars.

Craig Bernier

Craig Bernier’s collection of short stories, Your Life Idyllic, is the winner of the St. Lawrence Book Award.

Seven of the nine stories in the book are set in metropolitan Detroit — mostly Macomb, Wayne and Oakland counties, Bernier said. One story is set at Ford’s Rouge Plant. It focuses on a man who feels trapped within his dad’s blue-collar life. 

Michigan Radio and Olympia Entertainment will welcome America's favorite storyteller, Garrison Keillor, to Detroit on Saturday, May 30, 2015 for a special live broadcast performance of A Prairie Home Companion.  The show will take place at the historic Fox Theatre in downtown Detroit.

The May 30 show will feature live performances and comedy skits by Keillor and the Prairie Home cast. Keillor will weave local humor into the show and share his signature monologue, "The News from Lake Wobegon," with Detroit audiences.

Valentine’s Day was yesterday, and maybe you’re still aglow from the candle-lit dinner you shared with your beloved at a fancy French restaurant.

Maybe you’re thinking about how, after the cheese plate, the chocolate mousse and a whole lot of wine, you finally got up the nerve to whisper “I love you.”

Just then the music swelled, and you waited with bated breath for your beloved’s response:

"Telefunken!" from Facebook fan Chris B.
Chris B. / Facebook

Just about every day of the year has something for some niche group out there.

Do you like peanut butter? There's a day for that.

Don't like to wear socks? Wave your sock-free freak flag every year on May 8.

Today is our day. 

a portrait of the band with instruments
Courtesy of Lindsay Lou & the Flatbellys

Michigan natives Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellys are spreading the love of music this Valentine's Day. Their latest album Ionia will be released on Saturday.

The album was recorded in the then-home of Lindsay Lou and her husband, who is the mandolin player for the band. Since then the band has moved to Nashville.

Lou says the move was motivated by stories they heard from friends about the music community there. While Michigan has many gifted young people that inspire creativity and collaboration, Lou says they're often spread throughout the state. She says Nashville provides more of a central community of musicians to feed off of each other's artistic energy.

Pages