Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture
3:35 pm
Wed November 28, 2012

EMU students take part in 'Hijab Day'

Participants at this year's Hijab Day gathering
Zaineb Al-Kalby Eastern Michigan University's Muslim Student Association

Forty Eastern Michigan University students spent a day this week dressed as Muslim women as part of "Hijab Day."

The hijab is a scarf that covers the head and neck and is worn by some women who practice Islam.

"Hijab Day" was started three years ago by EMU’s Muslim Student Association who hoped to spread awareness about Islam.

Group president Zaineb Al-Kalby helped participants put on the scarf she wears every day.

When the non-Muslim students looked in the mirror, she said they were surprised at their reflections.

"I really feel like they had that second of 'I'm actually in her shoes,'" she said.

EMU senior Emily Keyes, who was raised Catholic, participated in the event. She says she got mixed responses while wearing the hijab; some strangers looked away from her, while Muslim classmates told her they appreciated the gesture.

"I think it opened my mind to the way people perceive people that wear hijabs," she said.

After spending one day wearing the headscarves, the women met up to discuss their experiences and learn more about Islam's history.

-Elaine Ezekiel, Michigan Radio Newsroom

Arts & Culture
4:29 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Stateside: Michigan's shores documented in the Fresh Coast Project

Ed Wargin's Fresh Coast Project captures the Great Lakes in all their glowing beauty
Ed Wargin

Photographer Ed Wargin is enchanted by the Great Lakes; he endeavors to document all 10,000 miles of their shores with his Fresh Coast Project.

The project's aim is to celebrate the beauty of the Great Lakes through the ephemeral medium of film photography.

"I've realized we often look at the Great Lakes in parts and pieces. The goal of the project is to try to look at the Great Lakes as one story," said Wargin.

Wargin hopes his shots of gleaming sunsets will  inform people of the state's abundant resources and thereby promote their preservation.

Hear Wargin further discuss his Fresh Coast Project on today's podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Arts & Culture
3:46 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Stateside: Dana Falconberry's "Leelanau" soundscapes

Dana Falconberry's music draws from the lush landscapes of the Leelanau Peninsula
Alicia Vega

Listening to Dana Falconberry's lush music, it becomes clear the artist draws inspiration from Michigan's western coast.

We spoke today with Falconberry about her latest record, "Leelanau," and the role that Michigan's landscapes play in her music.

"It's so beautiful up there, it's easy to be inspired by the land," said Falconberry.

With track titles like "Pictured Rocks" and "Sault Ste Marie," Falconberry's latest is in many ways a musical homage to a state beaming with beauty.

Listen to Falconberry's interview and music in our podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Culture
5:06 pm
Fri November 23, 2012

Tradition of the “Christmas ship” lives on, 100 years after sinking

The U.S. Coast Guard has loaded 1,300 Christmas trees aboard the ice cutter Mackinaw for delivery to needy families in Chicago.

Captain Dave Truitt of the Christmas Ship committee in Chicago says selling cheap evergreen trees from the northern Michigan woods to families in Chicago was a tradition a century ago.

“People would come down and get telegraphs of what ships were coming. They would look to the horizon and one of them would have a Christmas tree tied to the top. And people would yell and scream and the church bell it would start ringing and it was the beginning of Christmas for the entire community,” Truitt said.

Captain Herman Schuenemann’s ship, the Rouse Simmons, became known as the Christmas tree ship.

“One of the reasons (Captain Schuenemann) was so popular besides being a very good guy, he was a good businessman. He had an amazingly simple sign on his large schooner,” Truitt said, “It said ‘Christmas trees cheap’.”

75-cents was cheap. On land trees sold for a dollar a piece.

This year’s trip marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the original Christmas tree ship. It was last seen above water November 23rd, 1912 before a big snow storm. There are still many evergreens in the ship’s hull at the bottom of Lake Michigan.

Check out the wreckage footage below (narration begins around a minute into the video).

Read more
Arts & Culture
4:50 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Stateside: Thanksgiving spreads your great-grandmother would recognize

Turkeys were amongst a vibrant spread of dishes served throughout Thanksgivings of the 1800's
Rebecca Williams Michigan Radio

Cyndy talks with Bill Loomis, author of "Detroit's Delectable Past"

With the exception of a few wild selections, the Thanksgiving spreads of today closely resemble those of the 1800’s.


Bill Loomis, author of “Detroit’s Delectable Past,” claimed our ancestors had a taste for animals of considerable size- such as the bear.


During the 19th century, animals were killed specifically for the Thanksgiving meal.


Cuts of chicken, duck, fish, quail and squirrel were served with mounds of squash and other root vegetables.

Read more
Arts & Culture
3:59 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Stateside: Detroit's historic parade of thanks

Santa holds the key to the city of Detroit before the crowds on Woodward Ave. at the conclusion of the parade (c. 1960)
Tony Spina Wayne State University

Cyndy talks with Romie Minor, author of Detroit's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

On a glinting Thanksgiving morning with sidewalks stuffed with families, the Detroit Parade floats by in a procession of color and sound.

You know the day- the pre-feast anticipation and relief of a  long weekend- these are among the things combining to make the morning special.

For Detroit, America's Thanksgiving Parade has a long tradition of brilliantly beginning the weekend.

Today we spoke with Romie Minor. He is a librarian and archivist at the Detroit Public Library. He wrote a book about the  Detroit's parade called Detroit's Thanksgiving Day Parade, co-authored with his wife Laurie Ann Tamborino.

According to Minor, the parade has existed in various forms since 1924.

Although it faced financial collapse at several points throughout its existence, the parade continues to thrive today.

While many of the floats' themes have evolved over the years, the gleeful expressions of children continue to remain consistent.

“When I look at the photos over the years, you see that look of awe on all the children’s faces. It doesn’t matter which decade, the face expression remains the same and it’s just great. It will be that way tomorrow,” said Minor.

-Cameron Stewart

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Arts & Culture
3:58 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Stateside: Keith Taylor's top three winter reads

"Cold" by John Smolens is one of Taylor's three recommended winter reads
johnsmolens.com

Cyndy talks with Keith Taylor about three of his recommended winter reads

As cold weather begins biting our fingers, reveries of fireside reading become common and lingering.

Keith Taylor writes both poetry and fiction; he coordinates the undergraduate program in creative writing at the University of Michigan and is the poetry editor for Michigan Quarterly Review.

Taylor knows Michigan literature-  so we asked him to compile a list of his three recommended winter reads. 

Read more
Arts & Culture
4:31 pm
Tue November 20, 2012

Stateside: Author Mark Binelli's industrious Detroit

Binelli's new book looks at Detroit's past, present and future
markbinelli.com

In his new book “Detroit City is the Place to Be: The Afterlife of an American Metropolis,” Mark Binelli addresses the multifaceted city with humor and patience.

The book was born during an assignment for Rolling Stone in 2009.

Binelli, a Detroit native, worked to portray the city with a nuance ignored by many outside voices.

Read more
Arts & Culture
12:30 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Remembering Sonny Eliot (VIDEO)

Sonny Eliot
DPTV YouTube

Sonny Eliot, Detroit radio and television pioneer, died this morning at his home in Farmington Hills.

He was 91.

For those who don't remember Eliot, he might be best known for his role as Detroit's star weatherman. Eliot had a quick wit and predilection for puns.

Here is a taste:

Read more
Arts & Culture
10:31 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Lincoln movie calls to mind his connections to Michigan

Abraham Lincoln and his son Tad looking at an album of photographs.
Library of Congress

Rick Pluta traces Lincoln's historical connections to Michigan.

"Thank God for Michigan."

It’s supposedly what Abraham Lincoln uttered in May of 1861 as 75,000 Michigan volunteers marched into Washington – the first to answer his call for help from what were then the western states in preserving the union.

But there’s no proof Lincoln said that, according to Bob Garrett.

He’s an archivist who researched Lincoln for the Michigan Historical Center in Lansing.

“Who knows? A lot of things like this get passed around and, you know … I don’t know. I would call that apocryphal. Maybe he said it. He might have. He very well might have, but I have not seen any evidence that he said that,” Garret said.

Read more
Arts & Culture
8:55 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Veteran Detroit broadcaster 'Sonny' Eliot dies

Sonny Eliot delivers a weather forecast in the early days of local TV news in Detroit
storytellermn.com

FARMINGTON HILLS, Mich. (AP) - Longtime broadcaster Marvin "Sonny" Eliot, whose corny jokes and genial manner endeared him to Detroit audiences for decades, has died. He was 91.

Friend and co-worker Don Swindell says Eliot died Friday morning at home in the Detroit suburb of Farmington Hills after an illness.

One of the city's most well-known media personalities, Eliot was a throwback to a time when local television established its identity through non-news programming that made up with enthusiasm and creativity.

His longest-lasting gig was as a weathercaster, first on WWJ radio in 1950 - a job he held well into the 21st century - as well as on local television stations.

Eliot retired in 2010 from broadcasting, announcing the end of his career on WWJ.

Survivors include his wife, Annette. Arrangements were pending Friday.

Arts & Culture
4:25 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Stateside: Art exhibit addresses Michigan detainee

"Jailed Humanity" draws artists from across the country to spread awareness of Amir Hekmati
http://www.facebook.com/events/362885770472100/ 555 Gallery

Opening this weekend at the 555 Nonprofit Gallery and Studios is “Jailed Humanity: In Support of an American's Quest for Freedom from an Iranian Prison."

The exhibit aims to raise awareness of detainee Amir Hekmati’s situation.

Upon visiting family in Iran, Flint resident Hekmati was detained by the Iranian government and accused of being a spy.

In January, Hekmati was sentenced to death. Two months later, Iran’s Supreme Court found the verdict against Hekmati was incomplete and overturned the death sentence.

To this day, Hekmati sits in an Iranian prison, awaiting a new trial.

Read more
Arts & Culture
4:23 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Stateside: Veteran receives highest honor from French government

Glenn Dickerson displayed his newly awarded medal for Cyndy
Mercedes Mejia

When Glenn Dickerson shakes hands, he feels he is representing every soldier with whom he once fought.

The World War II veteran shook many hands on Tuesday as he was awarded the Knight of the Legion of Honor medal.

“I feel with that medal I represent others’ feats, those who didn’t make it back," said Dickerson.

Read more
Arts & Culture
4:17 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Stateside: An author's love letter to the Midwest

Mike Draper's new book revels in the rich cultural history of the Midwest
raygunsite.com

To Mike Draper, the Midwest is a mystery.

Draper is the author of “The Midwest: God’s Gift to Planet Earth,” a jovial investigation of the region and the major figures who have come from it.

Deemed by those on the coast as “flyover country,” the states of the Midwest receive the portrayal of a land populated only by farmers and fried food junkies.

But the image is a false one.

Without the Midwest, New Yorkers would have no planes in which they could fly across the country.  

“The Midwest is viewed as the American Gothic farmland, which as a region, is only a minority of it. The Midwest has never been a primarily agriculture economy,” said Draper.

When doing his research for the book, interesting Midwesterners seemed to manifest themselves in every corner of the history books through which Draper flipped.  

The Wright Brothers and Henry Ford reinvented the ways Americans could inhabit the world.

Using their literary prowess, authors like Ernest Hemingway and Mark Twain formed new standards for American fiction.

With such rich cultural icons as these, one begins to wonder how anyone could dismiss the Midwest as plain or timid.

It is a question Draper raises throughout “God’s Gift.”  

And with its mysterious beauty, the Midwest provides its answers on every page of his book.

-Cameron Stewart

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Arts & Culture
6:11 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Art world, meet East Lansing: could new museum change downtown?

The Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum
Photo Courtesy of MSU News

East Lansing is your classic college town: a laid-back mix of beer, bongs and bookstores.  

But with the opening of a $45 million modern art museum, suddenly the international world is paying attention to "good 'ol Michigan State."

As Michigan Radio's Kate Wells reports, some locals like the attention more than others. 

For something right across from a Taco Bell, the Broad art museum sure smells like money.

Read more
Culture
4:46 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Stateside: Old news put to good use

Old News archives out of print items from around Washtenaw County.
T. Voekler

Retired newspapers are finding a new purpose.

Old News, a project started by the Ann Arbor District Library, archives previously published news items throughout Washtenaw County.

Eli Neiburger works for the AADL, and works primarily on the Old News project.

"Libraries are service industries and we want to help people," said Neiburger.

Old News functions as a resource for anyone curious about past news items and family lineage.

"Our goal is to get people the answers to the questions of their own history," said Neiburger.

For more on Old News, listen to the above podcast.

Read more
Culture
4:37 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Stateside: The men with the bomber planes and the man with the camera

Bill Rosnyai flew a B-17 Bomber in the WWII European Theater.
Brad Ziegler

Flying bomber planes over German and Japanese terrain, Bill Rosnyai and Murray Cotter spent much of World War II in the air.

In observation of Veterans Day, Stateside spoke with Rosnyai, a former navigator on a B-17 in Europe and Cotter, a former bombardier on a B-24 in the Pacific.

Joining them was Brad Ziegler, a freelance photographer who has been photographing Michigan’s World War II veterans, particularly as the vets took special “Honor Flights” to visit the World War II memorial in Washington, D.C.

Read more
History
3:58 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Michigan men unearth pieces of downed WWII-era plane

CASCO TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) - Four men say they have unearthed pieces of a World War II-era fighter plane in a southeastern Michigan farm field.

Jim Clary, his brother, Ben, and two men from the Michigan Treasure Hunters used metal detectors to make the find earlier this month in St. Clair County's Casco Township just east of Richmond.

Jim Clary tells the Times Herald of Port Huron the recovered fragments are from a P-38D Lightning that was piloted by 2nd Lt. Al Voss, a native of Elgin, Ill., assigned to the 94th Pursuit Squadron stationed at Selfridge air base in Michigan.

Voss died in the October 1941 crash.

The Daily Tribune of Royal Oak reports the men uncovered several shards of the plane about 8 inches down in the dirt.

That's What They Say
8:07 am
Sun November 11, 2012

Lax about the pronunciation of lackadaisical?

Merriam Webster has one pronunciation for the word lackadaisical, but often people pronounce it laxadaisical.

“I would guess that what’s happened here is that speakers have reinterpreted lackadaisical as related to lax. And once they do that they change the pronunciation of lackadaisical to laxadaisical” said Anne Curzan, a professor of English at the University of Michigan.

Curzan says in surveys she’s done, half the people say lackadaisical and half say laxadaisical, but it doesn’t seem to be because of generation differences.

It’s seems that the combination of the letter K and S is what causes the confusion. Another mix-up can be found in words like especially and espresso.

Read more
Arts & Culture
5:57 pm
Fri November 9, 2012

"The Spaceship" lands at MSU: $45 million art museum opens

A view of the planned Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum from the northwest. Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects.
MSU News

Michigan State University opens its $45 million contemporary art museum this weekend.

But even the building's creators say they're not sure whether the community will like it.

Students already have a nickname for the Eli and Edythe Broad Museum: "the spaceship."

“"It looks pretty spacey,” says student Will Peltier, taking out his ear buds to remark on the building. “Kinda like something that NASA would create. It's like, real sharp looking."

Read more

Pages