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Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

A theatre wall
DREW MCLELLAN / FLICKR - HTTP://BIT.LY/1XMSZCG

As he often does, David Kiley of Encore Michigan returned to Stateside today to bring us the latest on theater happening across Michigan.

Listen above to hear Kiley’s previews of the following shows:

Employee perks have become increasingly elaborate over the years.

Some jobs come with unlimited vacation time and months of paid parental leave. There are companies that offer a constant supply of free food. This place has on-site car wash facilities, bicycle repair, haircut services and spa treatments. 

It's a far cry from stale "all-you-can-drink" break room coffee and the occasional Hawaiian shirt day. 

Your job may not have the perks you crave, but don't worry. This edition of That's What They Say has several "perks" and zero detriments.


Michigan Radio and The Whiting will present a live performance of The Moth Mainstage at the Capitol Theatre in Flint on Thursday, June 7, at 7:30 p.m. The Moth Mainstage features a line-up of writers, performers, and other unique national and Michigan storytellers, each with a ten-minute story to tell live without notes.

Stateside 3.7.2018

Mar 7, 2018

Today on Stateside, the director of the Michigan Department of Transportation answers your questions about Michigan's roads. Also today, we learn what it's like to watch a loved one with early-onset Alzheimer's slowly slip away.

John Sinkevics, editor and publisher of LocalSpins.com, joined Stateside today to bring us the latest from West Michigan’s music scene.

Listen above to hear about a brand new group to West Michigan, a group that’s been touring the country for several years, and a singer/songwriter that’s “legendary,” Sinkevics says, with about 40 years of experience under his belt.

The Fountain of the Pioneers in 1940
Mamie L. Austin / Kalamazoo Public Library

Kalamazoo's Fountain of the Pioneers will be removed later this year.

The Kalamazoo Gazette reports the Kalamazoo City Commission voted 5-1 early Tuesday following a city commission meeting that began Monday night on the future of the Bronson Park fountain.  

Our goal here at That's What They Say is to answer our listeners' burning questions about language. But here's an interesting question -- why are those questions burning in the first place?

Obviously, a question is not a physical object. You can't douse a question with gasoline, throw a match at it and watch it burn.

However, that's not to say there isn't something about a burning question that's hot.

Courtesy of The Chamber Group.

Today, Netflix releases an original documentary series about Flint.

During 2016, the directors of Flint Town followed the Flint Police Department at the peak of the water crisis. Zack Canepari joined Stateside to discuss the series he co-directed with Drea Cooper and Jessica Dimmock

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

“I was listening to your great piece from a couple of weeks ago about Brewed in Michigan,” Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings said about a recent interview with author William Rapai on Stateside. (You can hear the interview conducted at Arbor Brewing Company here.)

Saddle Road Press, 2017

Michael Collins’ second collection of poems, Appearances, functions as a spiritual guide of sorts for the non-believer.  The poems follow Collins’ trips to an unnamed harbor park “where the temporal opens to the depths” and the writer is “daily stumbling onto tiny mysteries.” Collins’ meditative approach to life’s mundane rituals stands out among contemporary poetry collections, begging philosophical questions of the reader and making subtle pleas for conservation along the way.

Stateside 2.28.2018

Feb 28, 2018

Today on Stateside, past Michigan Teachers of the Year weigh in on safety and guns in schools. We also hear why a small town in our state had a pizza funeral 45 years ago.

woman holding a dave levinthal blackface polaroid
Courtesy of David Pilgrim / Ferris State University

Ferris State University’s Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia has an important mission: to use objects of intolerance to teach tolerance and promote social justice.

The museum recently received a significant donation to help towards that mission.

An anonymous donor has given them 135 large-format Polaroid prints from photographer David Levinthal’s famous and controversial Blackface series.

picture from the new film Jumanji welcome to the jungle
Courtesy Sony Pictures

The film Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle stars Dwayne Johnson, Karen Gillan, Jack Black and many more names. It was inspired by the work of Chris Van Allsburg, the renowned writer and illustrator of children's books. He's won two Caldecott Medals for his illustrations for The Polar Express and Jumanji, which was published in 1981.

Van Allsburg grew up in Grand Rapids, and he joined Stateside to talk about the original Jumanji and this new take on the story.

Screengrab - Mismatch / YouTube

Things don't always fit together neatly. Life would be really boring if they did.

That's the driving idea behind a new podcast called Mismatch – "stories of the incompatible, the unsuitable, and the out-of-step."

The podcast will air during Stateside’s normal time slot (3-4 p.m. and 10-11 p.m.) on Monday, Feb. 26 and on Tuesday, Feb. 27.

The courtroom may not be the best place to ponder grammar and language issues. If you do find yourself in a courtroom, it's likely you've got bigger problems on your hands -- especially if you're the defendant.

Assuming you're a word nerd like us though, you may find yourself distracted by a grammatical question regarding the verb "to plead." 

There's no mystery when it comes to the present tense -- "I plead not guilty." But if someone asks you about your plea later, do you tell them you "pleaded" not guilty or "pled" not guilty?


Stateside 2.23.2018

Feb 23, 2018

Today on Stateside, we discuss whether requiring utilities to buy renewable energy helps or hurts consumers. Also today, Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel explains his county supports regional transit, just not this RTA plan.  And, we learn about a group in Washtenaw County that offers help for hoarders.

Courtesy of Kartemquin Films

Laura Checkoway just finished a film that is now being nominated for an Oscar. She’s the director, producer, and editor of a film called Edith+Eddie. It’s up for Best Documentary (Short Subject). She is from Ann Arbor.

Checkoway joined Stateside to discuss how she learned about Edith and Eddie, who at 96 and 95 are America’s oldest interracial newlyweds, how her film comments on America’s system of elder care, and what it feels like to receive an Oscar nomination.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

It’s Black History Month and the Cheers! team of Tammy Coxen and Lester Graham have a cocktail recipe used by America’s first celebrity bartender, Cato Alexander.

“I wanted to make sure that we gave a shout out to some of the amazing black bartenders who have worked in the past and in the present,” Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings said.

Stateside 2.20.2018

Feb 20, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear and discuss new music from Black Milk, Jack White, and Andrew W.K. And, we learn lawmakers may consider bills allowing guns to be taken from dangerous owners.

THE QUILT INDEX

For six years now, the Detroit Unity Temple has held a quilt exhibit in February. Many of the quilts – but not all – are tributes to African-American history. This year a quilt that’s getting a lot of attention is called “Strange Fruit."

Devon Christopher Adams / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Each month, we take a listen to new music from Detroit-area artists.

This time, the theme is "anticipation." After some four years, Black Milk, Jack White, and Andrew W.K. are set to release new albums.

There was a Sunday not so long ago when a listener noticed our own Professor Anne Curzan say "the days where" instead of "the days when." 

Judy wrote to us that she enjoys listening to the show and, for the most part, agrees with Curzan's approach to language and usage.

However, she goes on to reference our show about muckety-mucks and big wigs. Curzan said big wigs went back "to the days where in court, lawyers and the judge would have big wigs."

Judy was not impressed.


Sheila Y / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Tonight, silent French films from the early 20th century will play at the Max M. Fisher Music Center in Detroit as part of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra’s French Festival. But there’s a twist: the films won’t actually be silent. They will be accompanied by the live performance of original scores by the Andrew Alden Ensemble

Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Today, the long anticipated movie “Black Panther” is being released. It’s a Marvel Comics movie and the central character is black. A recent article in the New York Times Magazine argued this movie is a “defining moment for black America.”

In a sign of the film's anticipated cultural importance, an organization called Hero Nation along with Ypsilanti High School are taking more than 100 students to a private screening of “Black Panther." 

Courtesy of Maya Stovall

An exhibition currently at the Cranbrook Art Museum challenges our idea of what a theater is. Rather than an ornate performance space like, say, the Detroit Opera House or Orchestra Hall, this exhibition shows that a not-so-typical space can be a theater: a liquor store. The exhibition is titled Maya Stovall: Liquor Store Theatre Performance Films. Maya Stovall is a Detroit artist and who has her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology and Performance Studies from Wayne State University.

Stateside 2.14.2018

Feb 15, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear why your special someone might be waiting for you at a Traverse City bookstore. And, we discuss why there aren't any medical marijuana facilities in Grand Rapids.

Courtesy of Amy Reynolds and Victor Herman

 

If we can't talk about love stories on Valentine's Day, when can we?  

Which is why today seemed appropriate to talk to Horizon Books, right there on Front Street in downtown Traverse City, which has a long history of romantic encounters. 

Flatiron Books, 2017

Librarian Annie Spence knows what it’s like to love a book so much she has to write it a love letter. She also knows what it’s like for a break-up letter to be in order.

Her letters to books fill the pages of her own new book Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks.

Drew McLellan / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

  

Music bio shows take center stage this month on Theater Talk.

Today, David Kiley of Encore Michigan brought Stateside the current offerings from professional theater companies around the state. 

There are a few different ways to talk about retaliating against someone in equal terms. There's "an eye for an eye," "a tooth for a tooth," and "measure for measure," among others. 

These phrases are all pretty transparent. If you take my eye, I'll take your eye. If you make that move, I'll make this move.

But what about "tit for tat?" One of English professor Anne Curzan's colleagues recently asked us about this one, and it's no wonder -- the meaning isn't nearly as obvious.


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