Arts & Culture

Stateside
5:05 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

Preserving today's digital record for future generations

SpecialKRB / flickr

Think, for just a moment, of the many ways we capture moments of our lives and share them with everyone.

Snap a photo on your smartphone and in seconds, it's up on Twitter or Facebook or Instagram for friends, family and followers to see.

But what is going to happen to those moments and memories someday in the future when Instagram or Tumblr or Facebook or Flickr no longer exist?

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Culture
3:52 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

Martin Luther King Jr.'s forgotten visit to the University of Michigan's campus

Martin Luther King speaking at UM's Hill Auditorium in 1962.
Bentley Historical Library

The University of Michigan celebrates the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. by holding annual symposiums on campus.

But it seems no one knew of King’s visit to campus in 1962 until an enterprising person at the Bentley Historical Library combed through their collection.

The Michigan Daily picks up the story from here (Haley Goldberg wrote about the discovery in 2012):

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That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun January 19, 2014

Homing in on ‘comprise’

If the whole comprises the parts, it seems like the parts should not be able to comprise the whole.

This week on That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan take on the verb comprise used to mean compose.

In the 15th century, comprise meant “to seize” or “to comprehend.” From there, comprise took on the definition “to include.” With this meaning, a big part comprises smaller parts.

However, by the 18th century, comprise also meant compose, allowing small things to comprise a larger thing. Ever since this change, the two words have often been used interchangeably.

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Arts & Culture
6:12 am
Fri January 17, 2014

Why images of strangers make us feel less alone

A photo from Humans of Ann Arbor's Facebook page. It has 4,380 likes.
Susan K. Campbell

Full audio's above, if you really want to feel the awkwardness, and awesomeness, of asking strangers if you can take their picture.

If you’re walking around Ann Arbor or Detroit these days, you should know:  a total stranger may come up and ask to take your picture.

They’ll snap a few shots. Maybe ask how your day is going.

Then they’ll post it all on Facebook. And hundreds, possibly even thousands of people will see it.

That’s because two photographers – one in each city – are building a growing fan base around these daily street photos.

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Arts & Culture
5:30 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

DIA helps us correct errors in an earlier broadcast

Flickr

Yesterday, on Michigan Radio, we discussed the news that a group of philanthropists and foundations have raised more than $300 million to try to save works from the Detroit Institute of Arts and protect city worker pensions.

However, in the course of our conversation, we had a couple errors.

AnneMarie Erickson is the Chief Operating Officer of the Detroit Institute of Arts and she joined us to help clarify the situation.

*Listen to the audio above.

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Stateside
4:51 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Ann Arbor father seeks respect for all dads in America

Father and son.
Flickr user dadblunders Flickr

How about some respect for dads, everyone?

How about we stop with the marketing and entertainment cliches portraying Dad as a big ol' doofus who can't boil a pot of water or change a nasty diaper? And we start recognizing that men play a very active role in the home life and they are not the opposite side of the coin to the "supermommy."

This has been the mission of our next guest. Doug French been one of the nation's leading "daddy bloggers" ever since launching his blog "Laid Off Dad" over 10 years ago. And in July 2010, he created another blog, When the Flames Go Up, blogging with his ex-wife about co-parenting after divorce.

He's also the co-founder of the upcoming Dad 2.0 Summit, which aims to raise the profile of America's dads in the eyes of companies and marketers.

He does all of this as he practices the fine art of being a dad.

Doug French joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:51 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Detroit Zoo recognized as leader in animal conservation and welfare

Detroit Zoo entrance.
Wikipedia

It was 1883 when the Detroit Zoo first opened its doors at Michigan Avenue and Trumbull Street, across from what would become Tiger Stadium.

By 1928, the zoo had moved its current home at 10 Mile Road and Woodward Avenue. It's the No. 1 paid tourist attraction in Michigan, drawing more than 1.1 million visitors every year.

The zoo's mission has evolved  since those early days, shifting from animal care to animal welfare. It's a leader in animal conservation and welfare.

Detroit Zoo Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer Ron Kagan  gives us a closer look at the ways the zoo has become such a leader in protecting and preserving animal species.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
7:48 am
Tue January 14, 2014

DIA supporters seek $170 million more to save Detroit's art and pensions

The Detroit Institute of Arts wants to strike a "grand bargain" to save itself.
DIA

This next story is a call to anybody with $170 million to spare.

And a major fondness for art.

By now, you’ve heard about the group of philanthropists who’ve raised $330 million to strike a “grand bargain” with Detroit’s creditors.

Their goal is to raise half a billion dollars to save city-owned art at the Detroit Institute of Arts from being sold off in the city’s bankruptcy.

But that grand bargain may still require a small miracle.

Fair or not, bankruptcy pitting art against pensioners

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Arts & Culture
5:11 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Mitch Albom explores life and the afterlife in his new book

Albom's book, "The First Phone Call From Heaven".

What if the end is not the end?

It's that question that lies at the core of Mitch Albom's latest book, "The First Phone Call From Heaven."  The story takes place in Coldwater, Michigan, where a handful of inhabitants are receiving mysterious phone calls from people who have died. Are the calls from the afterlife, or just a hoax?  Mitch Albom tells us more about his newest book.  Listen to the full interview above.

That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun January 12, 2014

When proper names become everyday words

People’s names show up in the English language in surprising places, such as "pasteurized milk" and "ham sandwiches."

University of Michigan Professor of English Anne Curzan and Weekend Edition host Rina Miller discuss eponyms, or words that are derived from proper names, on this week’s edition of That’s What They Say.

The verb pasteurized is an eponym. It comes into the English language in 1881 from the name Louis Pasteur, who invented the pasteurization process.

Sandwich is also an eponym.

“We think that the word comes from John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich. He was a gambler, and once he spent 24 hours at the table gambling, and all he had to eat was meat between two slices of bread," Curzan explains.  Thus, the sandwich was named after him.  

The adjective ritzy is yet another eponym. Unrelated to the crackers, ritzy came from hotels.

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Stateside
8:43 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Detroit ruins become a playground for 'free skiers'

Clip from Poor Boyz Productions YouTube

After 40 years of decline, Detroit has become a haven of so called ruin porn, with people flocking from all over the country and the world to photograph the city’s many decaying buildings.

Once winter was in full swing, a video went viral on social media. And it’s an epic, not to mention adventurous example of ruin porn.

Stateside’s Emily Fox has more.

Listen to the full audio above.

Watch "Tracing Skylines":

Stateside
4:11 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

When John Lennon came to Ann Arbor

A program from the John Sinclair Freedom Rally at Crisler Arena on December 10, 1971.
Wystan Flickr

An interview with James Mitchell.

Dec. 10, 1971. Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor. John Lennon steps up to the microphone.

"It ain't fair, John Sinclair…” the former Beatle sings.

In his new book, "The Walrus And The Elephants: John Lennon's Years of Revolution," author James Mitchell tells the story of Lennon’s trip to Michigan, and why Ann Arbor was the perfect launchpad for Lennon's new life as a revolutionary.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Arts & Culture
2:44 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Insane Clown Posse, Juggalos sue FBI over gang designation

Violent J (Joseph Bruce) and Shaggy 2 Dope (Joseph Utsler) are the duo behind Insane Clown Posse
Sarah Hulett Michigan Radio

The rap duo Insane Clown Posse has filed a federal lawsuit against the FBI. The group says the government’s designation of its fan base as a “hybrid criminal gang” is unconstitutional.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan filed the suit on behalf of ICP and four of its fans, who call themselves Juggalos.

The ACLU says the gang designation has made Juggalos targets of harassment by law enforcement, and that the designation violates Juggalos’ First Amendment and due process rights.

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Stateside
5:08 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

What's behind the need to share on social media?

It's cold in Ann Arbor!
Mike Perini

  If you've logged onto Facebook, or checked your Instagram account, or maybe just following Twitter over the past 48 hours, you've no doubt seen the photos -- pictures of smart-phone screens showing the negative-digit temperatures, or the photo of a friend with a measuring stick in the snow to prove, yes, indeed, we got 17 inches.

Or, maybe you've read what all appear to be the same "status updates"telling you pretty much what you already know: It's cold out there!!

Just what is behind this need to share - over social media - what we're all experiencing? Cliff Lampe is an Assistant Professor at the School of Information at the University of Michigan.

*Listen to the audio above.

Stateside
4:29 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Michigan historian tells us how polio shaped FDR's presidency

One of the few photographs of Franklin D. Roosevelt in a wheelchair. Taken at Top Cottage in February 1941.
user Doco wikimedia commons

Michigan historian James Tobin has written a new book on Franklin Delano Roosevelt and how polio shaped the president he became. FDR was our 32nd president, and on his Inauguration Day, in the darkest days of the Great Depression, FDR sent out a timeless challenge to Americans.

*Listen to the audio above.

That's What They Say
12:10 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

'Because' is the 2013 Word of the Year

Interview aired on Sunday, Jan. 5.

Writers online, and now speakers in informal speech, are using "because" in innovative ways.

This week on That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan talk about the American Dialect Society's 24th Annual Words of the Year vote. 

Curzan says, “It used to be that because had to be followed by a clause. So, I would say, ‘I don’t want to go outside because it’s really cold.’ And now I can say, ‘I don’t want go outside because  cold.’”

More words of the year include: selfie, Obamacare, and slash.

Click here for more on the Word of the Year for 2013.

Stateside
4:22 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Local musicians blend tunes from Ghana, New Orleans, Detroit

Kofi Ameyaw on Ghanaian (xylophone) Gyil.
image from YouTube

Mark Palms and Kofi Ameyaw are two of the musicians behind the band A L'Afrique.

*Listen to our interview with them above.

Stateside
4:57 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

Two men from Kalamazoo write and perform 'The Michigan Poem'

Kirk Latimer and Gabriel Giron performing "The Michigan Poem."
Facebook

(Editor's note: This interview was first broadcast on October 28th, 2013)

Take poetry and the spoken word.

Mix in two stories of redemption.

Stir in a meeting at a Poetry Slam.

And top it with a poem about Michigan.

Do all of that, and you have Kinetic Affect. They are a spoken-word performing duo from Kalamazoo. And maybe you've seen their performance of "The Michigan Poem" making its way around the web: their straight from the heart poem about what it means to be from Michigan.

The Kinetic Affect duo Kirk Latimer and Gabriel Giron joined us today from Kalamazoo.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:46 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

Michigan writer releases new memoir about her time in Sweden

Author Natalie Burg
LinkedIn

(Editor's note: This story was first aired on October 2nd, 2013)

Who among us has not had the experience of plunging into something that sure sounded good on paper, but then the reality turns out to be anything but?

So, when life hands you that proverbial lemon, you could make ‘lemonade.’ Or you could write a book.

That’s what Natalie Burg did.

Michigan writer Natalie Burg had a spectacularly bizarre experience living on a farm in Sweden, working as an au pair for a spectacularly bizarre family. She has turned all of that into a new book called “Swedish Lessons: A Memoir of sects, love and indentured servitude. Sort of.”

She joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
3:04 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Author Blaine Pardoe delves into a 1963 Battle Creek murder

barnesandnoble.com

Blaine Pardoe interview for 9/3/2013

(Editor's note: This story was first broadcast on September 3rd, 2013) 

The mystery of who killed Daisy Zick has been on the minds of police and residents of Battle Creek since January, 1963.  Though at least three people caught a glimpse of her killer, no one has ever been brought to justice for the crime.  

Writer Blaine Pardoe's latest book is called Murder in Battle Creek: The Mysterious Death of Daisy Zick.  He joined Cynthia Canty in the studio to talk about Daisy Zick, her unsolved murder, and the possibility that the killer may still be alive.  

Listen to the story above.

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