Arts & Culture

Arts/Culture
9:10 am
Thu January 19, 2012

Artpod: Einstein on the Beach...in Ann Arbor

Photo courtesy of Philip Glass

On today's Artpod, we head back to school.

When "Einstein on the Beach" opens in Ann Arbor this Friday, Jan. 20, it'll be the first time the opera has been performed in 20 years. But be warned: this isn’t your typical opera.

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Arts/Culture
7:00 am
Thu January 19, 2012

The allure of "Einstein on the Beach"

Photo courtesy of Philip Glass

When "Einstein on the Beach" opens in Ann Arbor on Friday, Jan. 20, it’ll be the first time the work has been performed in 20 years. But be warned: this isn’t your typical opera.

Einstein on the Beach 101

It was first produced in France in 1976, and until now has only been performed in Europe and on the east coast.

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Arts/Culture
2:05 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

MSU's Broad Museum faces unexpected construction delay

Eli Broad, businessman, art collector and Michigan State Universitry benefactor
(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

A new multi-million dollar art museum at Michigan State University will open months later than planned.   

The Eli and Edythe Broad museum was supposed to be dedicated in April on the East Lansing campus. But Michigan State University officials say supply problems are affecting work on the building.  

A university spokeswoman says the building’s specially designed glass windows are the source of the problem.   

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Arts/Culture
4:40 pm
Mon January 16, 2012

Kevorkian's paintings at center of lawsuit

"Nearer my god to thee" by Jack Kevorkian. Photo courtesy of Ariana Gallery

The late Jack Kevorkian’s paintings are at the center of a lawsuit headed to Oakland County Circuit Court on Wednesday.

The dispute is over 17 of Kevorkian’s paintings.

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Before Tech
5:25 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

Writers Series: Before Tech with essay by Keith Taylor

Michigan poet and writer Keith Taylor.
Robert Turney

For our series Before Technology, we asked Michigan writers to share their thoughts on life before smart phones, the internet and social media.

Keith Taylor is a Michigan poet and writer. He describes the benefits of technology when we’re far away from home.

Arts/Culture
12:05 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Artpod: Work, reimagined

user ronnieb morgueFile

Today's Artpod is all about work...or rather, re-imagining what work can be.

Many people view Michigan as ground zero when it comes to job loss and unemployment. Yet despite the tough economy, some people are quitting their jobs in an effort to pursue their creative passions, which are often unpaid.

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Arts/Culture
1:23 pm
Mon January 9, 2012

ArtServe Michigan to serve up fresh, local art

ArtServe Michigan to launch a CSA share...for art.
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

An arts advocacy group is stealing an investment idea from the agriculture world in an effort to get more folks to buy local art.

A statewide arts advocacy group wants to serve up some fresh, local art. To do so, the group is copying an investment model popular in the agricultural world.

Lots of farms in Michigan participate in Community Supported Agriculture. Folks can buy a CSA share in a farm. In return, the shareholder gets a weekly crate of fresh farm produce.

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Homelessness
6:54 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

Tent city in Ann Arbor operates through the winter

Tent city in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Here's an audio postcard from residents at the camp.

Camp Take Notice is a tent community of homeless people living in Ann Arbor.

Freezing temperatures will force many of its residents to find new places to live. But more than a dozen will stay through the winter.

Michigan Radio’s Mercedes Mejia and Meg Cramer visited the camp just before the first snow fall.

You can check out what the camp looks like here:

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Arts/Culture
10:21 am
Fri January 6, 2012

Reimagining what work can be

Many people view Michigan as ground zero when it comes to job loss and unemployment. Yet despite the tough economy, some people are quitting their jobs in an effort to pursue their creative passions, which are often unpaid. 

From fast food to felt toys

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Arts/Culture
9:48 pm
Wed January 4, 2012

Artpod: Aretha Franklin is looking for next big opera star

Photo courtesy of Aretha Franklin

We kick of the first Artpod of 2012 with an appearance by none other than the Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin.

I interviewed Franklin last month about her search for the next great opera star. That's right, opera star. Franklin wants to get in on the singing contest circuit, and she's turning her searchlight on the world of classical music.

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Culture
6:00 am
Mon January 2, 2012

Holland to award “Holland Is Ready” its social justice award

A Holland is Ready bumpsticker.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Holland is Ready will get one of the city’s social justice awards later this month. The award comes six months after Holland City Council rejected proposed anti-discrimination rules. A citizen nominated the group for consideration.

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Arts/Culture
9:32 pm
Sun January 1, 2012

More art pops up in Detroit's vacant spaces

One mural by artist Marianne Burrows features a pheasant, a common sight in Detroit's vacant lots.
via Facebook

In Detroit, massive population loss has forced people to envision new ways of using space.

Urban gardens have gotten a lot of attention. But there’s also a movement afoot to use art in a similar way.

One group of people has done just that this year with a vacant lot in an industrial corner just north of Detroit’s Midtown area. It’s called the Lincoln Street Art Park.

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Holiday
4:01 pm
Fri December 23, 2011

A Christmas letter

Creative Commons

Sending out a formal Christmas letter is a holiday tradition for many people. 

Author Wade Rouse, after receiving one too many Christmas letters, decided to pen his own.

Wade Rouse lives in Michigan and is the author of "It's All Relative: Two Families, Three Dogs, 34 Holidays and 50 Boxes of Wine.”

 

2011
2:53 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

A look back: Michigan Radio's arts and culture coverage

Image by John Wilson Michigan Radio

As part of Michigan Radio's end-of-year look back at some of the more notable stories, here's a collection of 2011 arts and culture stories that we feel deserve another look:

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Arts/Culture
3:12 pm
Tue December 20, 2011

Artpod: Made in Michigan

user anon morgueFile

For all your late holiday shoppers out there, today's Artpod is filled with ideas for giving local.

I put out a call on Twitter and Facebook to hear your thoughts on Michigan-made gifts you'd like to give (or receive) this year. I also reached out to the owner of an independent bookstore in Grand Rapids, and the owner of an independent music store in Ann Arbor to get their suggestions, too.

So without further ado, here's what you had to say about giving local:

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Religion
10:58 am
Tue December 20, 2011

Muslim religious leaders file suit against airlines

A lawsuit alleges that a Delta pilot refused to fly with two men in Muslim attire despite being cleared by the TSA.
Andrey Belenko Flickr

Delta Airlines and Atlantic Southeast Airlines are being sued by two imams who were asked to leave a Delta flight last May (Atlantic Southeast contracts with Delta on some flights).

According to CNN, Masudur Rahman and Mohamed Zaghloul were cleared to board by TSA officials twice. The flight originated in Memphis and was going to Charlotte. Both men were wearing traditional Muslim attire.

The suit alleges that the pilot of the plane, after leaving the gate, returned to the gate and refused to fly with the men on aboard.

CNN reports a Delta manager tried to intervene on the men's behalf, but could not convince the pilot to fly:

From CNN:

The manager told the men that the pilot, "despite acknowledging that both plaintiffs were cleared to board, was personally objecting to the plaintiffs being on his flight. The pilot indicated that he believed the mere presence and perception of the plaintiffs on his plane would make other passengers feel uncomfortable."

Rahman and Zaghoul are seeking damages from the airlines through a trial.

Arts/Culture
8:37 am
Tue December 20, 2011

ArtPrize 2011 pumps $15.4 million into Grand Rapids’ economy

Families take pictures in front of "Rusty" near the Grand Rapids Public Museum during ArtPrize 2011. Voters picked Rusty as number 5 in the top ten.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

A report released today by the Anderson Economic Group say this year’s ArtPrize added $15.4 million to the Grand Rapids economy. That estimate is twice the economic impact measured in each of the first two years. 2011 was the third annual ArtPrize.

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Arts/Culture
6:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Home Share program brings different generations under one roof

The Ann Arbor Home Share program at the University of Michigan connects homeowners over the age of 55 with younger people looking for a place to live. 

The program allows senior homeowners to manage household chores and offset costs--but it also offers companionship. 

Every arrangement is unique.

In some cases, younger roommates take on housework or run errands in exchange for lower rent. 

Michigan Radio's Christina Shockley spoke with Carol Tice and Kristina Gifford, who participate in the Home Share program. Tice, 80, rents out part of her home to Gifford, 24. Tice has been a participant for over 7 years.

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Writers Series
4:58 pm
Fri December 16, 2011

Life Before Technology, with essay by Susan Hutton

A former Stegner Fellow at Stanford, Susan lives in Ann Arbor, MI with her husband and two children.
Courtesy of Susan Hutton

We've been asking Michigan writers to share their thoughts on life before technology, the internet and social media.

Susan Hutton is a Michigan writer and poet. Before having twins, she had some idea of what parenting would be like -- along with the fears and struggles that come with it.

In her essay, Hutton tells us about parenting in the age of cell phones.

Michigan Radio wants to hear from you. If you are a writer and have something to say about life before technology, send us an email with your idea to storyideas@michiganradio.org

 

Arts/Culture
12:07 pm
Fri December 16, 2011

With Borders gone, holiday sales up at many indie bookstores

Inside Nicola's Books in Ann Arbor
Photo courtesy of Nicola's Books

Holiday sales appear to be up at most independent bookstores in Michigan, thanks in part to the fact that one of their major competitors is no longer around.

Borders, the now defunct big bookstore chain, was often accused of killing the independent bookstore. But those indie bookstores that remain are now reaping the benefits of Borders demise.

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