Arts & Culture

Arts/Culture
9:29 am
Mon January 23, 2012

Detroit Science Center still looking for funds, bank asks for liquidation

The Detroit Science Center is seeking $10 million in order to reopen its doors, according to Crain's Detroit Business.
Detroit Science Center

When the Detroit Science Center closed its doors last September because of cash shortfalls, officials there said they would reopen in early October.

It proved to be wishful thinking.

The Center continues to look for ways to drum up enough money to reopen.

Crain's Detroit Business' Sherri Welch reports that one bank is calling for liquidation:

Sources tell Crain's that Citizens Bank of Flint is demanding the Detroit Science Center board bring in liquidators so that the bank can recoup some portion of the money owed to it by the science center through the sale of its contents.

Citizens holds the debt on a $1 million credit line which is bundled with a $4.8 million mortgage tied to the science center's 2001 expansion.

The bank did not return messages left Thursday afternoon.

Welch says sources tell her that GM and Ford have "promised money to help bail the science center out." $10 million is being sought to cover debt and operating expenses for both the Detroit Science Center and the Detroit Children's Museum.

The Detroit Children's Museum, which is housed in the Detroit Science Center, closed its doors earlier this month. A message on their Facebook page posted on January 19 says, "we are still working on a reopening plan with Detroit Public Schools. Please stay tuned for more details."

Arts/Culture
5:38 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

African American history and culture in southwest Michigan

www.caaahholland.org

According to 2010 U.S. Census data, Holland, Michigan’s black population experienced a 20 percent growth in the last decade.

This week a new Center for African American Art and History opened in Holland, Michigan. 

Ruth Coleman is the center's director. She always wanted to see her African American culture representing in her community. 

Coleman hopes people in the Holland area come to the center to learn more about black culture.

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Arts/Culture
1:19 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

Public radio program 'On Being' focuses on Detroit

The "Feedom Freedom Growers" working in Detroit (photo posted on the "On Being" website).
Amy K. Senese www.amysenese.com

It seems the entire nation is watching what will happen in the Motor City.

A new documentary opens this weekend looking at Detroit as the epicenter of the fallout of the new global economy.

And now, in their latest episode, the public radio program On Being uses Detroit to look at rebuilding.

The program's producers write the program is:

A Detroit you probably haven't seen in the news. It's a city of vigor — a place where neighbors are reimagining work, food, and the very meaning of humanity. To meet these people is to gain perspective on all of our work, and how we might imagine possibility in our own community.

The program includes conversations with 96 year-old social activist Grace Lee Boggs about reinventing society.

You can listen to the program below, and let us know what you think. Write a review of the On Being episode in the comments section.

Arts/Culture
12:02 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

'Detropia' makes debut at Sundance Film Festival this weekend

The filmmakers say if people only take away the message that Detroit has problems after watching 'Detropia,' then "we've failed at our job."
screen grab from YouTube video

Yes, yes... there are a lot of abandoned buildings and sad reminders of better times in Detroit.

While some artists come to Detroit to gawk at the "ruin porn," as Michigan Radio's Jennifer Guerra has pointed out, the filmmakers of the new documentary "Detropia" say they hope people take away something other than a sense of awe at the decay.

Co-directors Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady say they want their audience to understand the people who stayed behind in Detroit:

"Initially when we went there, we were just looking for this Phoenix story. We were hoping that there were people on the ground there that were really just going to fix the place. But after spending a couple years filming there, and spending time with our characters we realized that was really just a very dishonest story," said Grady.

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Arts/Culture
12:39 pm
Thu January 19, 2012

More than 60,000 flock to DIA's Rembrandt exhibit

Head of Christ, Rembrandt van Rijn, oil on oak panel, c. 1648-50. Staatliche Museen Preussicher Kulturbesitz, Gemäldegalerie, Berlin
Photo courtesy of the DIA

The current exhibition at the Detroit Institute of Arts is shaping up to be the museum’s most popular exhibit in recent history.

Pam Marcil is director of public relations at the DIA. She says attendance at "Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus" has been "really overwhelming almost. We’ve had about 60,000 people to date."

She says the “exhibit has brought in 3,500 new and renewed memberships to the museum.

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Arts/Culture
9:10 am
Thu January 19, 2012

Artpod: Einstein on the Beach...in Ann Arbor

Photo courtesy of Philip Glass

On today's Artpod, we head back to school.

When "Einstein on the Beach" opens in Ann Arbor this Friday, Jan. 20, it'll be the first time the opera has been performed in 20 years. But be warned: this isn’t your typical opera.

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Arts/Culture
7:00 am
Thu January 19, 2012

The allure of "Einstein on the Beach"

Photo courtesy of Philip Glass

When "Einstein on the Beach" opens in Ann Arbor on Friday, Jan. 20, it’ll be the first time the work has been performed in 20 years. But be warned: this isn’t your typical opera.

Einstein on the Beach 101

It was first produced in France in 1976, and until now has only been performed in Europe and on the east coast.

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Arts/Culture
2:05 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

MSU's Broad Museum faces unexpected construction delay

Eli Broad, businessman, art collector and Michigan State Universitry benefactor
(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

A new multi-million dollar art museum at Michigan State University will open months later than planned.   

The Eli and Edythe Broad museum was supposed to be dedicated in April on the East Lansing campus. But Michigan State University officials say supply problems are affecting work on the building.  

A university spokeswoman says the building’s specially designed glass windows are the source of the problem.   

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Arts/Culture
4:40 pm
Mon January 16, 2012

Kevorkian's paintings at center of lawsuit

"Nearer my god to thee" by Jack Kevorkian. Photo courtesy of Ariana Gallery

The late Jack Kevorkian’s paintings are at the center of a lawsuit headed to Oakland County Circuit Court on Wednesday.

The dispute is over 17 of Kevorkian’s paintings.

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Before Tech
5:25 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

Writers Series: Before Tech with essay by Keith Taylor

Michigan poet and writer Keith Taylor.
Robert Turney

For our series Before Technology, we asked Michigan writers to share their thoughts on life before smart phones, the internet and social media.

Keith Taylor is a Michigan poet and writer. He describes the benefits of technology when we’re far away from home.

Arts/Culture
12:05 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Artpod: Work, reimagined

user ronnieb morgueFile

Today's Artpod is all about work...or rather, re-imagining what work can be.

Many people view Michigan as ground zero when it comes to job loss and unemployment. Yet despite the tough economy, some people are quitting their jobs in an effort to pursue their creative passions, which are often unpaid.

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Arts/Culture
1:23 pm
Mon January 9, 2012

ArtServe Michigan to serve up fresh, local art

ArtServe Michigan to launch a CSA share...for art.
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

An arts advocacy group is stealing an investment idea from the agriculture world in an effort to get more folks to buy local art.

A statewide arts advocacy group wants to serve up some fresh, local art. To do so, the group is copying an investment model popular in the agricultural world.

Lots of farms in Michigan participate in Community Supported Agriculture. Folks can buy a CSA share in a farm. In return, the shareholder gets a weekly crate of fresh farm produce.

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Homelessness
6:54 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

Tent city in Ann Arbor operates through the winter

Tent city in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Here's an audio postcard from residents at the camp.

Camp Take Notice is a tent community of homeless people living in Ann Arbor.

Freezing temperatures will force many of its residents to find new places to live. But more than a dozen will stay through the winter.

Michigan Radio’s Mercedes Mejia and Meg Cramer visited the camp just before the first snow fall.

You can check out what the camp looks like here:

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Arts/Culture
10:21 am
Fri January 6, 2012

Reimagining what work can be

Many people view Michigan as ground zero when it comes to job loss and unemployment. Yet despite the tough economy, some people are quitting their jobs in an effort to pursue their creative passions, which are often unpaid. 

From fast food to felt toys

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Arts/Culture
9:48 pm
Wed January 4, 2012

Artpod: Aretha Franklin is looking for next big opera star

Photo courtesy of Aretha Franklin

We kick of the first Artpod of 2012 with an appearance by none other than the Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin.

I interviewed Franklin last month about her search for the next great opera star. That's right, opera star. Franklin wants to get in on the singing contest circuit, and she's turning her searchlight on the world of classical music.

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Culture
6:00 am
Mon January 2, 2012

Holland to award “Holland Is Ready” its social justice award

A Holland is Ready bumpsticker.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Holland is Ready will get one of the city’s social justice awards later this month. The award comes six months after Holland City Council rejected proposed anti-discrimination rules. A citizen nominated the group for consideration.

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Arts/Culture
9:32 pm
Sun January 1, 2012

More art pops up in Detroit's vacant spaces

One mural by artist Marianne Burrows features a pheasant, a common sight in Detroit's vacant lots.
via Facebook

In Detroit, massive population loss has forced people to envision new ways of using space.

Urban gardens have gotten a lot of attention. But there’s also a movement afoot to use art in a similar way.

One group of people has done just that this year with a vacant lot in an industrial corner just north of Detroit’s Midtown area. It’s called the Lincoln Street Art Park.

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Holiday
4:01 pm
Fri December 23, 2011

A Christmas letter

Creative Commons

Sending out a formal Christmas letter is a holiday tradition for many people. 

Author Wade Rouse, after receiving one too many Christmas letters, decided to pen his own.

Wade Rouse lives in Michigan and is the author of "It's All Relative: Two Families, Three Dogs, 34 Holidays and 50 Boxes of Wine.”

 

2011
2:53 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

A look back: Michigan Radio's arts and culture coverage

Image by John Wilson Michigan Radio

As part of Michigan Radio's end-of-year look back at some of the more notable stories, here's a collection of 2011 arts and culture stories that we feel deserve another look:

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Arts/Culture
3:12 pm
Tue December 20, 2011

Artpod: Made in Michigan

user anon morgueFile

For all your late holiday shoppers out there, today's Artpod is filled with ideas for giving local.

I put out a call on Twitter and Facebook to hear your thoughts on Michigan-made gifts you'd like to give (or receive) this year. I also reached out to the owner of an independent bookstore in Grand Rapids, and the owner of an independent music store in Ann Arbor to get their suggestions, too.

So without further ado, here's what you had to say about giving local:

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