Arts & Culture

Arts/Culture
4:00 pm
Sun July 24, 2011

New reality series to focus on Muslims in Dearborn

TLC's "All-American Muslims" debuts in November
user ppdigital morguefile

A new reality show will focus on five Muslim families in Dearborn.

Filming is already underway for the new reality show “All-American Muslims.” The show will debut in November on TLC, the channel behind other reality shows like "Sister Wives" and "Kate Plus 8."

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Arts/Culture
4:35 pm
Fri July 22, 2011

Here comes the bride...down the football field!

Wedding ceremony on the 50 yard line at the Big House in Ann Arbor
Ray Anthony Photography

The University of Michigan football stadium is cashing in on the ever-growing wedding industry.

The Big House is now available for weddings.

Couples can pay $6,000 to get ready in the home and visitor locker rooms, and then head to the field for an hour-long ceremony.

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Music News
2:37 pm
Fri July 22, 2011

Enterprising young musicians on the road to Interlochen

Cellist Sara Page (center, right) rehearses with the World Youth Symphony Orchestra at Interlochen Arts Camp. Page is among the campers who made an exceptional effort to raise funds to attend the camp this year.
Sam Oldenburg for NPR

Originally published on Fri July 22, 2011 12:01 am

For young people who want a career in the arts, a handful of prestigious summer camps are a vital early step. Interlochen, in northern Michigan, is one of them.

Jessye Norman, Josh Groban, Norah Jones and Lorin Maazel all spent summers at Interlochen when they were younger. But with tuition ranging from $3,000 to $10,000, depending on the campers' age and discipline, does it mean that only rich kids get to follow in their footsteps? It turns out that some extra-resourceful young people are paving their own way. I went to camp to meet them.

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Arts/Culture
11:44 am
Fri July 22, 2011

A path through the darkness: An interview with Bonnie Jo Campbell

Bonnie Jo Campbell
Bonnie Jo Campbell

Bonnie Jo Campbell not only writes great Michigan books, she knows a lot about great Michigan books, too.

Campbell's most recent book, the novel Once Upon a River, earned a profile in Poets and Writers Magazine and was listed on Newsweek's  10 Must-Read Summer Books.

It has received critical acclaim from the New York Times Book Review, the Wall Street Journal, Entertainment Weekly, Parade, NPR, and Booklist.

Her previous book, American Salvage, was a finalist for the National Book Award.

Before coming into the studio, we had spoken about Michigan books, and to my surprise Campbell came into the studio with a big box full of books  - books either about the state or by Michigan writers.

We couldn't talk about all of them in the interview, so here's the list of books that Bonnie Jo Campbell brought:

  • How to Fly by Rachael Perry
  • Wolf Lake, White Gown Blown Open by Diane Seuss
  • Autopsy of an Engine by Lolita Hernandez
  • The Nick Adams Stories by Ernest Hemingway
  • Within the Lighted City by Lisa Lenzo
  • The Feast of Love by Charles Baxter
  • Lord of Misrule by Jaimy Gordon
  • Road to Wellville by T.C. Boyle
  • Freshwater Boys by Adam Schuitema
  • The Legend of Sleeping Bear by Kathy-Jo Wargin
  • Eden Springs by Laura Kasischke
  • Laughing Whitefish by Robert Traver
  • Stitches by David Small
  • Of Woods and Other Things by Emma Pticher
  • Michigan's Eastern Massasauga--An Historic Distribution by Tom Beauvais
  • "Brown Dog" by Jim Harrison
  • "Wanting Only to be Heard" by Jack Driscoll
  • "The Lost Tiki Palaces of Detroit" by Michael Zadoorian

Campbell had a couple of other recommendations, though she didn't bring the books with her: 

  • The Lake, the River, and the Other Lake by Steve Amick
  • The Women Were Leaving the Men by Andy Mozina

We spoke in Michigan Radio's studios about why people are drawn to dark books and what the difference is between why Hemingway's characters hunt and why Campbell's characters hunt. And despite her protest, we think she sounded awfully sophisticated throughout the entire discussion.

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Arts/Culture
5:50 pm
Thu July 21, 2011

Artpod: Flint, public art, and revitalization

The Genesse Towers were lit up for one night only as part of The Flint Public Art Project
Photo courtesy of Stephen Zacks

Flint is in the spotlight on today's Artpod.

We talk a lot about Detroit’s path to revival, but drive an hour northwest to Flint and you’ll find a city whose struggles are similar if not worse than Detroit's.  Now a coalition of artists, city officials and residents is trying to re-write Flint's story through art.

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Arts/Culture
3:45 pm
Thu July 21, 2011

Youth showcase art at Ann Arbor Street Art Fair

2011 Ann Arbor Street Art Fair
photo by Traci Currie Michigan Radio

Eighteen students from the Arts League of Michigan will showcase their drawings, paintings, and jewelry at the 2011 Ann Arbor Street Art Fair. The students are a part of a five week program that exposes them to different types of art from all over the world.  

Arrion Drumgoole is a student with the Arts League of Michigan.

"We’ve learned different techniques like shibori, which is Japanese dyeing on silk scarves. We’ve done kimonos, jewelry and paper sculptures. And we’ve also done stamping and cards and printing."

Arts/Culture
3:21 pm
Thu July 21, 2011

Ann Arbor Street Art Fair (audio slideshow)

Crowds at the Ann Arbor Street Art Fair.
Ann Arbor Street Art Fair

I am Traci Currie, and I spent the first day of the 2011 Ann Arbor Street Art Fair talking to people who ventured out into the blazing sun to enjoy all sorts of art from all over the nation.

Most people mentioned the weather, while others talked about their love of art. Some talked about both.

Here are their comments along with some photos I took at the Ann Arbor Street Art Fair:

- Traci Currie - Michigan Radio Newsroom

Arts/Culture
12:24 pm
Mon July 18, 2011

Motown film remake brings jobs to Michigan

Judy van der Velden Flickr

A remake of the seventies Motown-inspired movie Sparkle will be filmed in metro Detroit and employ 266 people. The state approved a three-million-dollar film incentive for the seven-million-dollar project. Sparkle tells the story of three  sisters’ journey to musical fame during the height of the Motown era in Detroit.

Michelle Begnoche is with the Michigan Film Office. She says the film will stimulate Michigan’s economy.

"This is a project that’s focused really a lot on hiring Michigan workers for its crew so we will see the economic benefit from that – hiring our workforce – and then obviously it’s something that we can use on the backend after it comes out to kind of help promote tourism in the Detroit area," Begnoche said.

Producers hope to release Sparkle in 2014.

- Amelia Carpenter - Michigan Radio Newsroom

Arts/Culture
6:00 am
Mon July 18, 2011

The 52nd Ann Arbor Art Fair kicks off this week

500,000 are expected to flock to downtown Ann Arbor for this year's art fairs.
Photo by ifmuth Flickr

An estimated 500,000 people are expected to make their way to Ann Arbor this week for the city’s annual Art Fairs, which is technically made up of four separate art fairs.

The fair, which runs Wednesday, July 20 - Saturday, July 23, will display works by more than 1,100 artists.

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food
10:00 am
Sat July 16, 2011

Which contender deserves the “Grandwich” title?

Nicole Infante came up with the idea for the 'Grandwich' signature sandwich competition. We split the contender at O'Tool's Friday.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

48 restaurants in Grand Rapids are competing to be the home of the first-ever “Grandwich”. The idea for the sandwich competition came out of a competition for the best ideas.

Nicole Infante wanted Grand Rapids to have a signature sandwich – like the Philly cheese steak sandwich. The idea got a lot of traction but the judges at the idea competition didn’t award her any money. The next day promoters of the downtown area offered to help make her idea reality.

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Arts/Culture
6:20 pm
Fri July 15, 2011

Warm welcome for new director of Grand Rapids Arts Museum

Dana Friis-Hansen meets with community members at a reception for him Friday afternoon.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Dana Friis-Hansen started at the Grand Rapids Art Museum Wednesday.

He told those gathered at a reception Friday he wants to make the downtown museum into center for all creative thinking, not just art.

“I really believe that as we look to the 21st century museums need to be community conveners and to be sites for bringing together people of different interests, different ideas.”

Friis-Hansen says the museum’s spaces and location in the city center will provide a good platform for that goal.

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Arts/Culture
4:06 pm
Fri July 15, 2011

U of M Press to publish serialized books online

The U of M Press is bringing serialized books back.
user mconnors morgueFile

A Michigan book publisher is using social media to update a popular 19th century publishing method made famous by Charles Dickens.

The University of Michigan Press will serialize two new novels using Facebook, beginning July 18.

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Arts/Culture
4:00 pm
Fri July 15, 2011

A kind of intimacy, a kind of edge: An interview with Christopher T. Leland

Christopher T. Leland

Christopher T. Leland is a committed writer.

The author of nine books, Dr. Leland's most recent book includes stories that he began working on when he was 19 years old.

The story collection, Love/Imperfect, was released in April and is part of Wayne State University Press's "Made in Michigan Writers" series.

I spoke with Dr. Leland via phone. We talked about the centrifugal force of cities, the "edge" of small towns, and the seemingly inescapable Michigan stories of Ernest Hemingway.

Brian Short: Welcome Christopher T. Leland to Michigan on the Page. I wanted to start with something I noticed in reading Love/Imperfect, your most recent book. Many of the stories in Love/Imperfect deal with people who either leave or don’t leave the small towns they grew up in. And I was wondering if you grew up in a small town? Did you feel that same kind of gravity pulling at you, trying to keep you there?

Christopher T. Leland: Well, yes and no. I actually grew up in middle-sized cities. In Tulsa, Oklahoma, and then in Charlotte, North Carolina, and then in Huntington Beach, California, which is a suburb of LA.

But I think, just as in small town America, there is this center which is centrifugally pulling you toward it. And when I was a kid, actually, we would visit these places. We would go to New York and go to Chicago. But the city was always the place you ultimately wanted to end up.

I mean it was always, it was always what I aspired to. I mean, I’ve lived in New York, I’ve lived in Buenos Aires, I’ve lived in Madrid, I’ve lived in LA, I’ve lived in San Diego (laughs). I’ve lived in Detroit. I appreciate the attractions of the 'burbs and the attractions, actually of small towns. There’s a kind of intimacy and a kind of comfort and, also (laughs), frankly, a kind of edge that comes with these kinds of communities.

At the same time, I mean, what you love about cities is that you wake up one morning and go, I’m really bored with this, and so you can go, walk or drive or take the subway or the tram or whatever, three miles away and be in a different world.

BS: Do you think it’s easier to write in cities?

CTL: Hmm. Maybe not. Because it’s too easy to get away (laughs). As opposed to being trapped where you kind of go, okay, well, if I’m going to escape this then I have to write about it because I can’t just go to southwest (Detroit). I can go to southwest (Detroit) and speak Spanish and eat Mexican or Salvadorian or Peruvian food and feel like I’m away from the Detroit that I know. Whereas, if I’m in Charlevoix, I can’t do that.

BS: I was wondering, with Love/Imperfect, a number of the stories involve war. But the stories generally stick to telling what happened to people either before or after when the men went. Do you think of this book as at least partly a book about war?

CTL: I think, you know, sadly enough, I think for Americans, somehow, whether you’re a soldier or not, certainly throughout the twentieth century and certainly during the last half of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, our lives have been so over determined  by war. I can’t think of my adolescence and my college years without thinking of the Vietnam War. I mean, it was a constant presence.

BS: When you think of Detroit or Michigan books, what pops into your mind?

CTL: Inevitably, you go back to (Ernest Hemingway’s) “Up in Michigan.” Everybody has to. I mean, I read that as an undergraduate. And I think my favorite story is the one called “The Light of the World” in which nothing happens.

It’s the one that takes place in the railroad station and they argue about Jack Ketchum and Jack Johnson. They argue about boxing matches and all this as they’re all waiting for a train. And it strikes me in that book as the most complex and ambiguous or ambivalent story in the entire collection. Because the only person who ultimately emerges as honest and admirable is the character who everyone dismisses.

It’s just a great story and I mean it shows you because, poor Hemingway, he gets either lionized or bashed. And, I mean, he’s a wonderful writer. He’s better at stories than he is at novels, as everybody says, but a terrific writer and a terrific influence.

BS: Christopher T. Leland is a professor of English at Wayne State University. He is the author of nine books, the most recent of which is Love/Imperfect. Chris, thank you so much for talking with me today.

CTL: Okay! And one more thing I wanted to make sure I got in. 

BS: Go ahead.

CTL: I’ve taught at Wayne (State University) now for 21 years. I can’t imagine — I think this is true — I can’t imagine a better gig. For anybody out there who is sort of developing ambitions in this direction. If you’re going to teach somewhere, teach at a large urban university where you get everybody. Yellow brown and black and white (laughs). The whole nine yards.

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Arts/Culture
9:00 am
Fri July 15, 2011

Revitalizing Detroit with public art (with slideshow)

A group of people gather outside Chazz Miller's art studio in Old Redford.
Emily Fox Michigan Radio

Artists in Seattle and Philadelphia have been painting large murals on abandoned buildings in an effort to revitalize neighborhoods. Philadelphia for example, has around 2,000 murals to help brighten the city.

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Arts/Culture
11:03 pm
Thu July 14, 2011

The Strange Sound Of Motown's Early Hollywood Years

Soul group The Nu Page was one of the few artists who released music on MoWest in its brief history.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu July 14, 2011 11:09 pm

Everyone has heard of Motown Records, but few probably remember its Los Angeles offshoot, MoWest. It didn't last long — only two years — but during its life span, MoWest allowed Motown to try out new styles and genres and create one of the most eclectic rosters in the label's long history. Most of MoWest's releases have been out of print the past 40 years, but a new anthology called Our Lives Are Shaped By What We Love: Motown's MoWest Story 1971-1973 finally highlights the label's life and legacy.

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Arts/Culture
1:42 pm
Wed July 13, 2011

Artpod: Two guys, one remote island, and a piano-hauling bicycle

Rabbit Island lies three miles from Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula
Image courtesy of Rob Gorski

On today's Artpod, we'll hear from a New York physician who bought a remote, uninhabited island in Lake Superior. His plan is to turn it into an artist residency next summer.

The land, known as Rabbit Island, is about a half hour boat ride from the Keweenaw Peninsula.

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Arts/Culture
10:15 pm
Tue July 12, 2011

Mr. B pedals his 'boogie woogie' piano across Michigan

Marc Braun (right), Brian Delaney and Pete Siers pedal the 352-pound piano across Michigan.
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

A quintet of musicians has been traveling across the state for the past 10 days. They don’t have a tour van or a u-haul stuffed with instruments. Instead, the guys are pedaling their bikes from Holland to Detroit…with their instruments in tow! They're also raising money for various charities along the way.

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Changing Gears
4:35 pm
Tue July 12, 2011

Your Story: Highs and lows of working in the family business

Amber Turner and Jordan Ceresnie are engaged and work together
Submitted by Amber Turner

Family bonding can be a reward for working in a family business. But there is also plenty Amber Turner worries about.

The restaurant industry took a beating in the economic downturn. Although some Wall Street analysts expect restaurants to pick up soon, a lagging restaurant industry makes Turner more than a little nervous. In her family, any trouble is multiplied.

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Arts/Culture
5:07 pm
Mon July 11, 2011

Detroit's new biz accelerator focuses on creative sector

New business accelerator focuses on creative industries
Dani Davis

A unique business accelerator opens today in Detroit. 

A lot of business accelerators, generally speaking, focus on internet startups and biotech companies. But with the new Creative Ventures Acceleration Program in Detroit, the spotlight is on creative industries:

"The industrial design world, the interior design world, fashion design, music production, video production and architecture."

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Arts/Culture
6:00 am
Mon July 11, 2011

Man buys remote Lake Superior island, plans new artist residency

Rabbit Island in Lake Superior.

An uninhabited island in Lake Superior will soon be home to an artist residency program.

New Yorker Rob Gorski saw the 91-acre island listed for sale on Craiglist. At first, he was skeptical. But after talking it over with his brother, both of whom are Michigan natives, they bought the island for less than $150,000.

The land, known as Rabbit Island, is about a half hour boat ride from the Keweenaw Peninsula.

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